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PioneerWCanadaPioneerWCanadaPioneer brand products are provided subject to the terms and conditions of purchase which are part of the labeling and purchase documents. SM TM Trademarks and service marks of DuPont Pioneer or their respective owners. 2015 PHII. What we do is in our name. Trust Pioneer brand canola hybrids with Pioneer Protector traits to give you the peace of mind you need when growing canola. There are two new hybrids this year Pioneer Protector Plus the rst and only canola seed with built-in resistance to both sclerotinia and clubroot. Pioneer Protector HarvestMax reduces the risk of harvest losses in canola. To nd out more talk to your local Pioneer Hi-Bred sales representative or visit pioneer.com. NEW NEW Table of Contents 14 1Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 24 FEATURES 08 FOUR PILLARS OF SEED TESTING Do you know the basics of seed testing No worries we give you the lowdown on what the major tests do and what you need to know about them. 14 MAKING THE TRANSITION Industry stakeholders say the barley industry must transi- tion to new varieties in order to keep up with demand and stay competitive. 18 NEW WINTER CEREALS CREATE OPPORTUNITIES FOR GROWERS Brasetto hybrid fall rye finds a niche among bakers and distillers while AC Emerson wheat is helping growers stand up to fusarium. 20 FUSARIUM AND YOUR FARM As Fusarium graminearum makes inroads across the province how do Alberta producers select the best varie- ties for their farms and protect their investments from infection 24 AG INDUSTRY KEEN ON BIOLOGICAL ENHANCEMENTS Biological seed enhancements are enjoying a surge in popularity and that trend is expected to continue for years to come. 28 UP TO SCRATCH As seed treatment popularity continues to grow new standards are set to take effect. What are the standards and are seed treaters ready for them Plus what produc- ers should consider when choosing on-farm mobile or commercial seed treatment facilities. DEPARTMENTS GREETINGS PRESIDENTS MESSAGES SEED PLANT PROFILE NEW VARIETIES NEW SEED FOR THE 2016 SEASON SEED GROWER PROFILE ACREAGE REPORT GROWER DIRECTORY SOURCE ALL YOUR SEED NEEDS VIEWPOINTS SEED GROWER DIRECTORY MAP SEED CLEANING PLANT DIRECTORY MAP ON THE EDGE 03 04 56 58 74 84 72 108 110 111 112 2 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta ON THE COVER Seed analysts at Leducs Seed Check Technologies count germi- nation tests. The Fall 2015 issue of the Alberta Seed Guide looks at the issue of seed quality and its importance to your farming operation. On page 8 we examine seed testing and what value the various tests can have for you and how they can help protect your investment. Making the Transition on page 14 sheds some light on how seed quality namely the need for new varieties of malting barley is of crucial importance to Albertas malt barley industry. On page 20 we look at fusarium and how to select the best varie- ties for your farm. Theres a lot more within these pages as well and we hope you enjoy this new issue of the Alberta Seed Guide. Cover photo courtesy Seed Check Technologies 34 GETTING SERIOUS ABOUT SOYBEANS Relatively new as a crop rotation tool in Alberta soy- beans are becoming a lucrative option for growers in the province. 38 HONEYBEES ON THE RISE According to Statistics Canada this critical pollinator has been increasing in number in Alberta and across the country. 42 THE GM ALFALFA SITUATION THREE PERSPECTIVES Opinions continue to be split on the issue of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant alfalfa in Canada. 50 FINDING MIDDLE GROUND Short crop rotations continue in popularity and profitability. Meanwhile disease and pest pressure is on the rise as is stress on disease- and pest-resistant traits and crop protec- tion products from pushing rotations. If short-term gain means long-term pain wheres the middle ground 68 DELIVERING MORE CHOICE TO THE MARKETPLACE The Prairie Grain Development Committee supported the registration of more than 30 wheat rye and triticale varie- ties adding more choice in the marketplace for farmers. 76 COVER CROPS MOUNTING A COMEBACK Cover crops are once again a cropping consideration in Alberta thanks in part to weed and pest resistance in some plants and an increased focus on integrated farming methods. 106 DIGITAL ACCESS TO ASG EVOLVES ASGs website has been revamped to be more useful and user-friendly. 42 Greetings 3Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 MINISTER CARLIER Fall 2015 PUBLISHED BY 403-313 Pacific Avenue Winnipeg MB R3A 0M2 PRINTED IN CANADA 204 453-1965 Email issuesissuesink.com PUBLISHER shawn.brook EDITORIAL mark.halsall lindsay.hoffman shannon.schindle marc.zienkiewicz CONTRIBUTORS kari.belanger jim.timlick DESIGN theresa.kurjewicz lesley.nakonechny DIGITAL nick.buhr kyle.dratowany caleb.macdonald MARKETING craig.armstrong katelyn.daman lynne.roy hiten.shah grayson.smart CIRCULATION dean.french The Alberta Seed Guide makes no expressed or implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose or otherwise concerning the use of any product and assumes no liability for any injury or damage direct or consequential incurred from the use of such products or services therein. Federal Provincial and Municipal laws and regulations supersede the information contained herein. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to the Winnipeg office Issues Ink 403-313 Pacific Avenue Winnipeg MB R3A 0M2 PRINTED IN CANADA INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING Please direct all sales or distribution inquiries to hiten.shah at 204 453-1965 or via email at hshahissuesink.com Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission from the publisher. Publications Mail Agreement No. 40030841 ALBERTA SEED GROWERS ASSOCIATION AS Minister of Agriculture and Forestry it is my pleasure to extend greetings to the readers of the Alberta Seed Guide. This important resource provides a wealth of information related to this essential and vibrant sector of our agricultural economy. The long-term success of our agriculture industry relies on a strong commitment to innovation research and development environmental stewardship and sustainability. Through valuable tools like the Alberta Seed Guide producers can stay connected and up-to-date about the latest developments in crop science and the latest agricultural practices that result in enhanced quality and efficiency of production. Agriculture continues to be an enormous contributor to our communities and to our provincial economy generating exports of nearly 10 billion last year and employing more than 86000 people. Our government is committed to supporting a thriving and sustainable agriculture sector that will add to the strength and diversity of our economy. As we move forward together we will continue to foster the entrepreneurial spirit hard work innovation and commitment to excellence that is the foundation of the agriculture sector and the highest quality of life for Albertans. Thank you to the Alberta Seed Growers Association and the Alberta Seed Processors for their continued work on behalf of the agriculture industry and best wishes for continued success to our producers. Oneil Carlier Minister Alberta Seed Growers Association 5030-50 St. Lacombe AB T4L 1W8 Ph 403 782-8022 Fax 403 782-5514 Email infoseedalberta.ca monica.klaas general manager 5030-50th St. Lacombe AB T4L 1W8 Office 403 489-9999 Fax 888 446-5853 monica.klaascleanseed.net 4 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Messages DAVID BISHOP DURING one of the massive rain events of 2014 when neighbours were helping neighbours bucket out basements and move valuables to higher ground one old-timer is on record as having said Well we are only two weeks away from the next drought. Unfortunately for some 2015 showed that dry weather pattern that most of us just wanted to forget even existed. On the bright side a year ago there were reports of massive vegetative growth with disappointing grain yields. So far this year reports from fall seeded crops are encouraging with hopes that preliminary visual yield estimates have been understated. One thing about the business of agriculture is that there are no guarantees when growing conditions get tough thats when management of the fine details seem to make or break a crop. Going into next year there may be thoughts about cutting back on inputs including seed and seed protection. However managing for a successful crop means doing the tright things. Ensuring that you have the best seed genetics possible the highest quality lab-tested seed. Investing in quality seed treatments to protect your seed investment again is simply good management. When bushels are abundant marketing grain on volume seems to work just fine but in years when harvest volumes are expected to be lower than the five-year average it becomes important to add value to your farming economics. Many of our 67 seed and grain processing facilities in Alberta have state-of-the-art equipment that can not only clean seed but also can be utilized to upgrade commodity grains for domestic or export markets. For example optical sorters that are in many facilities can easily remove ergot with low cleanout rates. A lot is happening in the seed and grain processing business ranging from new legal legislation governing Plant Breeders Rights on all of the crops we plant in Western Canada to opportunities in filling sea containers for export markets. Additionally we currently have two new builds in progress at Lougheed and Enchant where the boards of those plants deemed it necessary to rebuild to meet the needs of their farmer shareholders. There are many reasons to stop by your local seed and grain processing plant to catch up on the news to submit that seed sample to a seed lab for testing or to book grain cleaning. Please enjoy this edition of the Alberta Seed Guide we endeavour to address pertinent topics related to the seed and crops sector of western Canadian agriculture. Best wishes David Bishop President Alberta Seed Processors Email bisdvdaol.com 5Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 GLENN LOGAN FALL is a time of change. As the seasons change and our focus on the farm changes from harvest to marketing and planning next years crop we welcome you to the Fall 2015 edition of the Alberta Seed Guide. Our goal each year in producing this magazine and the seed.ab.ca website is to give you access to insightful information and useful tools allowing you to make informed decisions as you select the seed varieties and products for your farm. Innovation in the seed industry is at an all-time high. In recent years the seed industry has been very active in launching varieties with new traits and improved agronomic characteristics. Some of these reduce the need for pesticides while others help mitigate the effects of adverse climactic conditions. I am sure everyone has heard one or two stories this year about a field that surpassed expectations given the drought in many areas of our province. The purchase of certified seed helps further fuel this innovation and respecting Plant Breeders Rights helps ensure the growth of the seed industry in Canada. Our theme for this issue is Quality Matters and in todays competitive agriculture marketplace nothing is truer. Producing a quality product is the key to accessing premium markets and getting top dollar for your grain. More and more quality is assessed not solely on the characteristics of the physical crop but by the whole production system used to grow it. Canada No. 1 isnt always enough to get top dollar anymore. End users want to know what type of seed you used its health characteristics what management practices you employ on your farm storage segregation tactics and much more. As a seed grower the concept of quality and record keeping has been part of my business for many years. To produce pedigreed seed seed growers must follow rigorous production inspection and seed testing standards and the end product we sell comes fully guaranteed the blue tag says it all. Using certified seed as one of the tools on your farm is a great way to access marketing opportunities both locally and globally but there are many other benefits to certified seed use. Talk to your area seed grower and learn more. They are a wealth of information after all they grow your seed locally. We hope you enjoy the articles in this issue of the Alberta Seed Guide and dont forget to visit seed.ab.ca to help you find the right seed for your farm. Glenn Logan President Alberta Seed Growers Association Email wheatcrestfarmsgmail.com ALBERTA SEED GROWERS ASSOCIATION Visit SyngentaFarm.ca or contact our Customer Interaction Centre at 1-87-SYNGENTA 1-877-964-3682. Always read and follow label directions. The Alliance Frame the Purpose Icon and the Syngenta logo are registered trademarks of a Syngenta Group Company. Genuity Genuity Icons Genuity and Design and Roundup Ready are registered trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC used under license. Always follow Grain Marketing and all other stewardship directions. Details of these requirements can be found in your Monsanto Technology Stewardship Agreement and the Monsanto Technology Use Guide. 2015 Syngenta. Syngenta offers canola seed hybrids to fit your farm. Today is about planting tomorrows potential. At Syngenta were dedicated to bringing you top performing canola hybrids. You can trust them to deliver strong yield potential address disease issues and provide the high return on investment youre looking for. C is for canola and so much more. Seed Testing Do you know the basics of seed testing No worries we give you the lowdown on what the major tests do and what you need to know about them. Four Pillars of Seed Testing PURITY GERMINATION VIGOUR HEALTH 8 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta SEED testing doesnt have to be complicated but it can often be a challenge to get an understanding of what the basic seed tests do and what they tell you. Its a major reason why seed testing labs try and make things easier on customers who might otherwise be confused as to what to ask for when getting seed tested. We want to streamline the testing and provide recommenda- tions for certain crops based on time of year says Holly Gelech business development manager at BioVision Seed Labs based in Sherwood Park Alta. Grande Prairie Alta. and Winnipeg. BioVision offers a slate of testing packages designed for both cereals and peasfababeans. How do we test How does a germination result happen What methods and procedures do we use These are all common questions we hear Gelech says. According to Gelech and other seed testing experts we inter- viewed namely 2020 Seed Labs president Sarah Foster and Seed Check Technologies co-owner Morgan Webb the major common seed tests fall into four main catego- ries and looking at each one is a helpful way to get an understanding of seed testing. PhotocourtesySeedCheck 9Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 1. Germination Testing What is It According to Webb the objective of germination testing is to determine the maximum germination potential of the seed. Testing under field conditions cannot normally be duplicated. Laboratory methods have evolved in which controlled conditions are used to give rapid and complete germination for the majority of samples of a particular species. The seed analyst plants pure seed under prescribed methods for the species being tested. The seeds are incubated for the predetermined period of time. Germination is the best starting point for any seed lot as you want to know if its going to be capable of producing healthy normal seedlings that will produce plants that can develop to maturity Webb says. Webb explains that seeds are often sorted into four categories that make up the test results. Normal Seedlings Seedlings possessing the essential struc- tures that are indicative of their ability to produce useful mature plants under favourable field conditions. Abnormal Seedlings A seedling that does not have all essential structures or is damaged deformed or decayed which prevents normal development. Dead Seeds Seeds which are neither hard nor dormant or have not produced any part of a seedling. Fresh Seeds Viable seeds other than hard seed which fail to germinate when provided prescribed germination conditions. What it Tells You According to Foster a germination test provides a wealth of information about a seed that a grower needs to know. It reveals how well a seed is going to perform under optimum conditions fundamental knowledge that every grower should have about the seed he or she is planting. Reading a germination test is like reading a book. It tells us what happened to the seed before it came into the lab whether its right off the combine or if its been cleaned she says. There are certain symptoms that show up that tell us if its been sub- jected to frost or drought or if its too high in moisture. She notes that it can also pick up on disease and pathogens that may exist in the seed. According to Webb there are a variety of things that cause seedling abnormalities and the germination test can help you determine what caused them and it will alert you to them so you can know beforehand what quality of seed you are planting. Causes of seedling abnormalities Webb notes include mineral deficiencies in the soil frost damage heating damage mechani- cal damage insect damage chemical injury declining vigour and pathogenic infections. What to Watch Out For Although a germination test is fundamental and will tell you some very basic things about your seed there are some common mistakes growers make when reading their test results. One of the most common mistakes is that people add abnor- mal seedlings into their germination number at planting and they shouldnt Webb says. Abnormal seedlings dont have the structures or ability they need to produce a normal plant. However he notes that dormant seeds can sometimes be included in the germination number depending on when the test is being done. If testing in the fall you can sometimes ten- tatively figure them in. Retesting in the spring will verify that the dormancy is broken. Gelech recommends checking the report to see if the seed analyst included any specific comments along with the germina- tion result. Our analysts will report if there is low germination and they will describe some of the seedling symptoms they see. An exam- ple would be primary infection observed. What that means is during the germination test fungus was growing from the seed. Thats an indicator of seedborne disease Gelech says. An example of mechanical damage in seed. 2. Vigour Testing What is It If a germination test provides you with one side of the coin in regard to knowledge about how your seed will perform vigour testing gives you the other side of that coin. After germination we recommend following up with a vigour test right out of harvest and this is something producers should get in the habit of doing. The germination test will test it at opti- mum conditions and now were going to stress it and see how strong that seed really is Foster says. Germination is a standardized test whereas vigour is not standardized and is subject to each labs protocols. What it Tells You According to Foster seeds are placed under stress in a cold environment to determine the potential for rapid and uniform emergence. Also called seed health or seed viability testing sev- eral tests fall into this category. Vigour is a term for all the different cool stress accelerated aging and compaction tests. Its an umbrella term for a number of different tests Foster says. According to Foster in a vigour test the seed is introduced to a stressful environment unfavourable to seedling development. Its imperative to find out if there is a testing requirement and which seedborne diseases are present in your seed. Holly Gelech PhotocourtesySeedCheckTechnologies 10 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta What it Tells You Seed health and disease testing can help a farmer in other ways than just knowing what lurks on his or her seed. For example testing for fusarium is imperative to an effective fusarium man- agement program see story on page 18. When youre buying seed treatment its good to know what kinds of seedborne disease you have as well as potential for other disease that could be in the field. Seedborne disease is a good start because if youre introducing new seed from some- where you could be introducing new pathogens that you dont have already Webb says. When it comes to ascochyta in peas for example there are seed lots with none at all but many seed lots will have a small percentage of the pathogen and others may have high levels. There are provincial plant pathologists in the Prairies who will recommend levels of less than two per cent infection. If a seed lot has a low level of infection and you apply an effective seed treatment you may feel more comfortable planting that seed. If the seed lot has high levels of infection you might not consider using the seed even with the seed treatment. Fusarium-infected seed. This environment can be cool cold or warm or a combination of either high humidity and high temperatures or heavy moisture at low temperatures. If the seed lacks vigour one or more of these created stressors will suppress seedling growth but if the seed is vigorous it will withstand one or all of these stressors and grow as if it were on stimulants. Taken together vigour and germination test results provide a complete performance profile for a wide range of field conditions and can help guide important seeding decisions such as when to seed should you wait for warmer soil temperatures or can this seed survive an earlier planting into cooler soils If done right out of harvest the whole idea with germination and vigour testing is to determine if it has planting potential six months from now. It tells you whether it has longevity if its going to store properly and if it has real issues Foster says. You can make a decision on your seed quality now so you can decide if you want to purchase new seed or if youre going to manage any issues found in the seed. What to Watch Out For Webb notes that when a seed lab is accredited it is often accred- ited for germination and possibly purity but not for vigour testing. Its important to have a conversation with the lab you use about what kind of vigour test theyve done and what that means. You should be able to compare germination tests you got from one lab on the same seed lot to one you sent to another lab. If youre comparing vigour they may have done different tests. Its important to know what test theyve done and what it tells you. According to Gelech the cool stress test attempts to recre- ate early spring planting conditions by analyzing the uniformity of emergence under cool conditions with adequate moisture. This test often represents a lower test result in contrast to the germination which would be the highest expected emergence. Common variance between these two values is 10 per cent. An accelerated aging test exposes the seed to high tempera- tures and humidity. The seeds are grown for a certain period of time similar to a germination test and the number of normal seedlings are reported. A compaction test involves doing a cool stress test in compacted soil to see how it will perform under adverse soil conditions. 3. DiseaseHealth Testing What is It Seed health or disease testing detects any fungal bacteria or other issues in a seed lot that you might not want to introduce to your field or that could cause problems Webb notes. Common tests according to Gelech include Cereals Fusarium graminearum Fusarium ID five species Coch- liobolus sativus True Loose Smut Fungal Scan all species of fungi Pulses Ascochyta Botrytis Anthracnose Sclerotinia Full fungal scans are becoming more common Gelech notes. She says theres more awareness than ever of seedborne patho- gens and farmers want to know what threats might lurk on their seed. She says that while Fusarium graminearum gets a lot of press there are actually five common species of fusarium that can affect seed in Western Canada. NipsIt SUITE INTRODUCING COMPLETE SEED AND SEEDLING PROTECTION FOR CEREALS Both a fungicide and insecticide NipsIt SUITE is an all-in-one seed treatment. It provides effective protection against the most common pests and diseases. Its a superior easy-to-apply formulation that stays on the seed to give it the best possible start. INTEGO Solo THE ONLY REGISTERED SOLUTION FOR APHANOMYCES IN PULSE CROPS NEW INTEGO Solo is your best defense against Aphanomyces a root rot thats devastating peas in Western Canada. Also registered for pythium control and suppression of seed rot in lentils chickpeas dry beans and soybeans it ensures a bright future for your pulse crops. Ask your local retailer for more information. 1.800.868.5444 Nufarm.ca Always read and follow label directions. NIpsIt is a trademark of Nufarm Agriculture Inc. INTEGO is a trademark of Valent U.S.A. Corporation. 45832-02 1115 NEW ARRIVALS IN SEED TREATMENT Seed treatment is not a magic bullet. You need good seed to start with. Sarah Foster 12 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Foster agrees. We know there are seed treatments on the market that can control most disease pathogens within a certain percentage but theres no point trying to make a silk purse out of a pigs ear she says. Seed treatment is not a magic bullet. You need good seed to start with. What to Watch Out For According to Gelech different areas of Alberta and Canada are affected by different diseases. Pests including those that are seedborne may be regulated provincially or federally. Its imperative to find out if there is a testing requirement and which seed- borne diseases are present in your seed Gelech says. For example in Canada all certified pedigreed barley seed must be tested for true loose smut. 4. Purity Testing What is It According to Webb purity testing is required by the Canada Seeds Act to determine whether or not a lot makes a Canadian seed grade. There are two main areas used in physi- cal purity testing Percentage Test This test breaks the quantity analyzed down into pure seed other crops weed seeds inert matter and ergot or sclerotia bodies. The results are expressed as a percentage by weight. Examination by Count This test is an examination of known quantity of a seed lot for contaminants. Purity testing is usually done at a seed plant by an accredited grader Gelech notes. What it Tells You Webb says purity testing provides useful information to the producer planting the seeds. It can tell you if other crop kinds fungal bodies or weeds that you do not have or want in your area exist in a seed lot. It will also tell you the number of these contaminants so that you can keep from planting large quantities of them with your crop. Many weed species can be extremely invasive and difficult and expensive to control once established. With larger seed crop kinds most growers are shooting for a pretty clean purity. With smaller seeded crop kinds the purity has to be done by a laboratory and there is a tolerance for weeds and other crop kinds allowed in there. It is possible to ask for that test but usually if its graded certified already its met a standard thats pretty high Webb says. What to Watch Out For Purity often refers to two things accord- ing to Foster and its good to be aware of this varietal purity and physical purity. Varietal purity should technically be seen in the field by the field inspector she says. As far as purity testing goes physical purity is the test the grader does to make sure theres no weeds or other crops or inert matter in your seed. Marc Zienkiewicz PhotocourtesySeedCheckTechnologies The objective of germination testing is to determine the maximum germination potential of the seed. MAKE THE MOST OF SHORT SEASONS. Rocky Mountain Equipment carries the legendary Case IH Early Riser Planter row unit designed with agronomics in mind so you can make the most of short planting windows. New features mean accurate in-row spacing excellent soil-to-seed contact and earlier uniform emergence. Find these and other dependable CASE IH units at one of our 40 dealerships across the Canadian prairies. DEPENDABLE IS WHAT WE DO. ROCKYMTN.COM 14 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Barley Status Update WHEN it comes to malting barley in Western Canada AC Metcalfe is king. It makes up the lions share of malting barley acres in both Canada and Alberta. With high levels of extract and diastatic enzymes its reputation for brewing performance gener- ates strong demand from both domestic and export markets according to the Canadian Grain Commission CGC. CDC Copeland is the second most dominant malting barley grown on the Prairies. Thirty-two per cent of all barley grown in Alberta in 2014 was of this variety. They work very well in the malting and brewing process. Theyre very forgiving. End users around the world love them says Peter Watts managing director of the Canadian Malting Barley Technical Centre CMBTC in Manitoba. Canadian malt- ing barley is renowned for its high quality. But theres a problem Watts notes. Both varieties have been around for over 20 years and despite their popularity the indus- try simply wont be able to grow and use AC Metcalfe and CDC Copeland forever. Were a victim of our own success with these varieties. They dont yield as well theyre starting to have some disease issues and other deficiencies Watts says. Twenty years is simply too long to be growing the same malting varieties primarily because theyre not efficient to grow for producers and that doesnt allow Canada to be more competitive on both the domestic and global markets. The answer According to Watts the malt barley industry in Western Canada must transition to new varieties and the sooner it does so the better. Searching for a New Malting Barley A number of barley varieties are being promoted as replacements for AC Metcalfe and CDC Copeland but finding the perfect fit is not so simple. Its been attempted in recent years but didnt quite work out as many had hoped. And considering how long it takes to actually bring a new variety to market theres a lot on the line when it comes to launching one. Pat Juskiw barley breeder at the Alberta Agriculture Field Crop Development Centre in Lacombe Alta. spent the summer of 2015 researching new varieties and actually made some selec- tions that will be brought to market in about 10 years she says with a chuckle. Its an example of how time-consuming and expensive it is to actually bring a new variety of barley to market. And if a new variety ends up not being popular with an end MAKING the TRANSITIONIndustry stakeholders say the barley industry must transition to new varieties in order to keep up with demand and stay competitive. user like the brewing industry that means a lot of time and resources have been wasted. This is what happened to CDC Meredith. Great variety high yielding low levels of beta glucan so it went through the malt- house fast. The maltsters were happy she says. But then the brewers began making beer with it on a large scale and they found it had a bitter aftertaste. CDC Meredith was registered in 2009 and after AC Metcalfe and CDC Copeland is now the third most popular barley variety grown in Alberta. But according to Juskiw it just doesnt seem to have what it takes to fulfill all the characteristics prized by the brewing industry. The breweries will take it when they have nothing else to take but theyve decided they dont want it as a replacement for AC Metcalfe or CDC Copeland Juskiw says. As a result the malting and brewing industry continues its search for a successor to the two dominant varieties says Rich Joy. Hes the director of malting and technical Services for Canada Malting Company in Calgary which is the largest malt company in Canada producing around 450000 metric tonnes of malt each year for brewers and distillers around the world. The Canadian Malting Barley Technical Centre supports the commercialization of Canadian malting barley and malt through applied research and analysis in its pilot malting and brewing facilities. 15Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 ProductCampaignNameCertifiedSeed DateProducedOctober2011 PublicationSeed.AbTypeLive3.25x7.125 Our genes only come in blue. When you purchase SeCan certified seed youre getting the promise and performance of SeCan genetics. And with certified seed youre investing in the future of plant breeding and new varieties that contribute to your bottom line. Make the comfortable choice. Choose SeCan certified seed. For genes that fit your farm visit www.secan.com Genes that fit your farm is a registered trademark of SeCan. Ad Number SEC_CERT11 SEC_CERT11_SA.qxd 101711 315 PM Page 1 People got excited when CDC Meredith came around. Right off the bat it had about 13 per cent higher yield than AC Metcalfe and it garnered a lot of interest very quickly. It also has a better disease package than AC Metcalfe. As a result with it being reg- istered as a two row malting variety it went through co-op trials and the committees sanctioned it equal to or better than check varieties Joy says. But some of the quality deficits in regard to malting became more apparent as you did more and more commercial trials and thats why a lot of malting companies backed off on it. The good news according to Joy is there are several up-and- coming varieties that may end up replacing AC Metcalfe and CDC Copeland. New Players After two decades of testing Bentley barley from the Alberta Field Crop Development Centre is getting noticed. According to data from Alberta Barley Bentleys positive performance in the 2012 CMBTC trials have boosted its reputation as a whole-package barley. Bentley performed as well as AC Metcalfe and CDC Cope- land in most test categories. In addition it had the highest extract yield and the highest per cent plump kernels of the three varieties. Bentley is the fifth most popular variety grown in Alberta at the moment comprising only 4.6 per cent of total barley acres in the province according to CGC data. The AC Newdale variety from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada also shows promise. Its Albertas No. 4 barley in terms of total acres. According to the CGC with good friability and low levels of beta-glucan it performs well in the brewhouse. Its more moderate levels of enzymes soluble protein and free amino nitrogen FAN make Newdale well suited for all-malt brewing. But according to Joy one variety to really watch is Syngentas AAC Synergy. In terms of total barley acres in Alberta it ranks at only No. 10. But despite being an underdog at the moment Joy said it might have what it takes to replace AC Metcalfe and CDC Copeland as the next big variety in the brewing industry. Its rivaling CDC Meredith in terms of yield around 15 per cent higher than AC Metcalfe and eight per cent higher than CDC Copeland. As a result theres a lot of interest in it Joy says. Other varieties worth watching in the future include the Uni- versity of Saskatchewans CDC Polarstar currently Albertas No. 6 barley in terms of total acres and CDC Bow which comes out of the University of Saskatchewan as well. Peter Watts is managing director of the Canadian Malting Barley Technical Centre and says 20 years is simply too long to be growing the same malting barley varieties. Pat Juskiw barley breeder at the Alberta Agriculture Field Crop Development Centre in Lacombe Alta. says it can take over 10 years to successfully commercialize a new malting barley variety. 16 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Transitioning to New Varieties According to Joy brewers have a quality wish list for the barley they use. Preferred barleys should have ultra-low protein low enzymes low FAN high extracts and a particular flavour profile. But if the malting and brewing industry hopes to adopt newer varieties on a timely basis a solid plan is needed to facilitate the change says Watts. Its obvious that the industry needs to do a better job as an industry to transition to new varieties of malting barley over the course of time he says. We have to have a strategy that spans the entire value chain to encourage both end users and producers to embrace new varieties on a timely basis so we are maximizing the value of the investment we make in breeding. In this post-Wheat Board era Watts says developing such a plan is crucial to the future of the malt industry in Canada. Dif- ferent countries around the world have systems in place for that and in Canada its fair to say that because the Wheat Board was partially responsible for the marketing of malting barley and commercialization of it they were the de facto market devel- opment agency. In the post-Wheat Board area the cereal grain industry has had to fill that void he notes and adds that the malting barley industry in particular has a challenge on its hands due to the fact there are numerous competing crops out there. We talk a lot about specialty crops like pulses and mustard but malting barley is just about the only crop thats completely sold and marketed on a variety-specific basis. Its all identity- preserved he says. According to Watts the fact that barley is a very sensitive crop that has to germinate when it arrives at the malthouse in order for it to be useable makes it unique among all other crops. It must be kept in specific conditions and handled very carefully. Its very complicated to grow to move to handle to market and ultimately to deliver to the end users and process he notes. All those factors combined make malt barley a highly special- ized industry. Marketing newer varieties to the malting and brewing industry will require a coordinated effort in order to encourage end users to adopt them Watts adds. We have to get the technical quality data from the new varie- ties in their hands as soon as possible so they can evaluate it and we have to get new product into their hands quickly if they decide they want to give them a go. We pour millions of dollars a year into cereal breeding programs in Canada to have the best quality varieties. If those varieties arent picked up and grown by end users that money is not being invested wisely and essentially is being wasted. Joy says theres added pressure from corn taking over acres in Alberta as well. Garson Law research manager for Alberta Barley says despite the challenges it faces Albertas barley industry is a strong one that can overcome whatever challenges it faces. Certainly there are corn acres but equipment storage drying and export logistic issues would suggest corn isnt really in a posi- tion to take over barley acres he says. Our main competitors are canola and pulse crops which are of higher value than corn. Shifting to barley varieties that have better agronomics while also meeting the demands of end users especially in the malt industry can dramatically improve the economics of barley in the future. Marc Zienkiewicz The malting and brewing industry continues its search for a successor to the two dominant varieties. ISO 90012008 certied Fully Accredited for Full Service Make your foresight 2020 what you cant see wont hurt you or so the saying goes. In the case of seed nothing could be more wrong. What lurks unseen and unknown can cost you and your customers big money. Find out more at 2020seedlabs.cathe2020difference Contact us toll-free at 1-877-420-2099 Join the conversation the2020difference All other products are registered trademarks of their respective companies. Varieties are available while supplies last. 2015 UFA Co-operative Ltd.All rights reserved. 1115-45376ABSG Nexera DEKALB InVigor CANTERRA SEEDS Syngenta The best canola varieties and advice to match. UFA works with the leading seed companies to bring you the newest top-yielding canola hybrids that ensure you get the most out of every acre. From names like InVigor CANTERRA SEEDS DEKALB Syngenta and Nexera we have solutions with genetics for particular disease resistance yield advantages or early maturity ratings. Our prices are competitive and were always here to help. Our Crop Insights advisors are ready to assist in designing a successful plan from planting through harvest. To ensure you get the hybrids that are right for your farmcall your local UFA and book your seed today. Winter Cereals 18 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta AC Emerson holds the first resistance R rating for fusarium among any class of wheat and although most of the crop was grown in the eastern half of the Prairies it has a place in Alberta due to increased concerns about fusarium. AS Canada moves into the frigid months growers are thinking about diversifying rotations and conversation is turning to winter cereals. There are unique new options to consider now and two in particular saw hugely successful years in 2015. The first commercial crop of AC Emerson winter wheat was harvested in 2015 and according to Canterra Seeds which holds the distribution rights to the variety developed by Rob Graf of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in Lethbridge the widespread launch was hugely successful. AC Emerson holds the first resistance R rating for fusarium among any class of wheat and although most of the crop was grown in the eastern half of the Prairies it has a place in Alberta due to increased concerns about fusarium. The response has been very positive. We didnt have an easy winter last year and winter survival was good across the board says Brent Derkatch director of operations and business develop- ment Canterra Seeds. Yield quality and protein levels have all been very positive so far. We havent heard any specific negatives coming from a feedback perspective. AC Emerson also falls into the popular CWRW milling class. Its similar in yield to CDC Falcon and has improved winter hardiness over CDC Falcon and Flourish. It also sports medium maturity and also has resistance to stem and stripe rust. When you combine the good milling characteristics of this variety with the disease resistance its an attractive option for farmers planting winter wheat Derkatch says. In fact the crop performed so well 154000 commercial acres were planted according to figures from the Manitoba Crop Variety Evaluation Team that the major stumbling block it encountered had nothing to do with the variety itself. Theres been a lot of pressure on winter wheat acres. With so many canola acres re-seeded this spring due to frost damage the canola crop in some parts of the country is later than what was originally planned and a lot of farmers like to seed winter wheat on their canola stubble Derkatch says. Theres also been high- yielding spring wheat varieties with yields similar to winter wheat this year so theres environmental and market dynamics at play that extend beyond the variety. With CDC Falcon being re-designated to the general purpose wheat class Derkatch says it was the perfect time to launch Emerson on a large commercial scale. Despite Alberta not having as big of a fusarium problem as other parts of the Prairies Derkatch sees a strong future for Brasetto hybrid fall rye finds a niche among bakers and distillers while AC Emerson wheat is helping growers stand up to fusarium. Emerson in Alberta as a result of its fusarium resistance. With the R rating for fusarium head blight its an offensive strategy when farmers in Manitoba are choosing Emerson to manage fusarium levels. In Alberta its a defensive strategy to prevent the disease from gaining momentum there. When you have a variety with genetic resistance thats a key tool in the toolbox. But he cautions growers not to look at Emerson as a fool-proof way of preventing fusarium in their wheat. Even with Emerson we highly recommend an appropriately- timed fungicide application to manage fusarium. The R rating doesnt mean immunity it simply means it has an advanced level of resistance. We recommend farmers use all the tools at their disposal to manage their wheat crop effectively. Milling and Distilling Brasetto Takes Off 2015 is the first season Brasetto hybrid fall rye will be planted by farmers. Brasetto hybrid fall rye shows a distinct yield advantage with yields that are 20 to 25 per cent higher than the check vari- New Winter Cereals Create Opportunities for Growers PhotocourtesyCanterraSeeds 19Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 This will create a major shift when launched next year. Its 10 per cent higher yielding than Brasetto and if we can add another eight or nine bushels to the yield that will help the rye market grow even more Merryweather adds. It will be the first cereal to be able to hit yields of 100 bushels per acre on a regular basis. KWS also granted Canadian marketing rights to another hybrid fall rye variety Guttino to the SeedNet group based in southern Alberta. Guttino enjoys substantially higher yields than non-hybrid varieties more stable falling numbers and signifi- cantly better cold tolerance than winter wheat. Marc Zienkiewicz ety currently available in the market. Brasetto was developed by German-based KWS the leading rye breeder in the world which has provided FP Genetics with the first viable cereal hybrid ever registered in Canada. Its being marketed primarily to millers and distillers. Were just in the process of finalizing shipments of seed to growers who will be growing it. Were expecting about 20000 acres of Brasetto being seeded this fall. This was an excellent launch year. We beat all expectations says Rod Merryweather CEO of FP Genetics. We expect this to grow to considerably more acres next year and the years to come. Its delivering some tremendous results for fall rye growers. Like AC Emerson wheat the eastern Prairies received the bulk of seed shipments for its launch. The little bit of seed we had last year primarily went into Mani- toba and a bit in Saskatchewan and a bit in Alberta. In southern Saskatchewan and Alberta it didnt do well because of the severe drought but we were still able to get 40 and 50 bushels of yield which was OK but wouldnt pay the bills long-term he says. In Manitoba growers saw over 90 bushels an acre in some cases with the rest reporting yield in the 80-plus range. Generally theyre seeing a response in bushels per acre about 15 per cent above winter wheat. Not a company to rest on its laurels FP Genetics already has plans to replace Brasetto with another KWS hybrid fall rye variety Bono. Its currently in the testing stage. Brasetto was developed by German-based KWS the leading rye breeder in the world. PhotoLesleyNakonechny When you combine the good milling characteristics of this variety with the disease resistance its an attractive option for farmers planting winter wheat. Brent Derkatch Examining Fusarium THE presence of Fusarium graminearum continues to increase in varying degrees across Alberta especially in the southern region of the province. Consequently its becoming more important for Alberta producers to choose cereals with fusarium head blight tolerance. How do producers go about selecting the right varie- ties for the areas they farm Choosing the best variety involves a number of factors says Brent Derkatch Canterra Seeds director of operations and busi- ness development. First and foremost is to look at multiple sources of information such as data from seed guides and seed distributors he says. Seed guide data is generated from small-plot trials he says and its an excellent place to begin. After that check out data that is closest to real-life management techniques. Seed suppliers and seed growers are an excellent source of field-scale commer- cial production management producers can relate to he says. Seed producers often have multiple years experience working with a variety before farmers can get their hands on it. Use that expertise. Theyre managing the seed increase on a large-field scale and generally under management practices that would be similar to what a commercial farmer would use. After trawling through all available data producers should take a step back and determine what markets theyre target- ing is it a high-yield feed market or a high-quality high protein market There are many important factors for assessing varieties in addition to yield and disease resistance such as protein and maturity. Its the combination of attributes that will make the variety successful for the farm. Derkatch also recommends planting different crop types such as winter wheat different varieties within a crop type and different maturity levels which helps spread out harvest timing workload and risk. Any time were making recommendations to farmers we want them to make sure theyre spreading their risk. As farm opera- tions get larger and larger farmers need to be able to manage Fusarium and Your Farm As Fusarium graminearum makes inroads across the province how do Alberta producers select the best varieties for their farms and protect their investments from infection Dont rely solely on the genetics just consider it another tool in the toolbox. Utilize all the tools available to you to manage an effective crop. Brent Derkatch 20 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta their businesses and a big part of that is spreading the work- load he says. Producers will then have the best opportunity to be profitable across the farm. When it comes to fighting FHB in Alberta Canterra Seeds winter wheat variety AC Emerson is a game-changer. Its the first wheat variety ever in Western Canada to be resistant to FHB. Der- katch sees the introduction of this variety as a defensive strategy to keep the disease at bay rather than the offensive measure it is in the eastern Prairies where levels of F. graminearum are much higher. Even though AC Emerson has a disease-resistant rating for FHB that doesnt mean immunity says Derkatch. Its important that farmers realize whether its a disease resistance rating for fusarium or any disease in any crop an R rating doesnt equal immunity. Were still recommending with Emerson for example farmers utilize fungicide to control fusarium in the crop. Dont rely solely on the genetics just consider it another tool in the toolbox. Utilize all the tools available to you to manage an effec- tive crop he says. We dont expect genetic resistance alone is going to be suf- ficient to stay ahead of Mother Nature. In many cases diseases evolve in time so its important to keep it off balance by using all the tools. Slow the Spread Gayah Sieusahai a pest regulatory officer for Alberta Agriculture and Forestry says its essential to use FHB-tolerant varieties in areas of Alberta where F. graminearum has been detected. He 21Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 Seed Now Pay Later agricard.ca Much Later. Subject to approval by Desjardins Financial Group credit department. If the total amount of a purchase made by way of deferred payment nancing is not paid in full on the due date shown on the statement of account it is automatically converted into a purchase by way of equal installments nancing repayable by equal consecutive monthly payments as to principal and credit charges at the annual interest rate for the equal installments nancing plan in effect at the date of conversion. The annual interest rate of not more than 15.9 is calculated from the payment due date shown on the statement of account until such purchases are paid in full. The number of equal monthly payment plan varies from 12 to 36 monthly payments depending on the balance converted. AgriCard is a registered trademark of Desjardins Financial Group. Use your AgriCard to purchase qualifying seed at participating seed dealers today and enjoy no payments no interest until November 2016. Find participating dealers full details and more at agricard.caseednowpaylater. 46540 AgriCard SeedGuideAd_3-5x9-875_a2.indd 1 2015-10-01 656 AM also recommends a defensive strategy of using FHB-tolerant vari- eties in areas that do not have detected levels of F. graminearum- infected seed. The use of tolerant varieties if available should be encour- aged to slow development of FHB in areas without FHB infesta- tion. Tolerant varieties should be used to prevent disease as part of a FHB management strategy says Sieusahai. The presence of mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol and zearalenone produced by F. graminearum reduces the market- ability of grain. Cereal and corn producers at risk for FHB losses are encouraged to create fusarium management plans for their farms including as many best management practices as possible to limit the introduction escalation spread and economic impact of the disease. Unfortunately says Sieusahai there isnt one BMP that can control FHB on its own however when combined the BMPs listed below add up to good control. F. graminearum is a pathogen all cereal and corn producers in Alberta should familiarize themselves with and be ready to manage says Sieusahai. It represents a serious threat to the industry he says but can be successfully managed using the following recommendations Phase 1 Before planting and at planting Use healthy seed that has been certified free of F. graminearum by an accredited lab Choose a variety that has the best resistancetolerance to F. graminearum Crop rotation allow more than two years between cereal crops avoiding corn in rotation with small grain cereals where possible Field selection avoid fields at high risk for F. graminearum i.e. fields surrounded by corn or with a recent history of severe head blight Apply a fungicidal seed treatment with F. graminearum on the label Increase seeding rates to promote a uniform stand and shorter flowering window Stagger planting dates so the entire farm is not flowering at the same time Phase 2 In-crop Avoid irrigation at flowering Scout field to determine the level of F. graminearum present Consider a well-timed fungicide application with a product that has F. graminearum on the label Phase 3 Harvest management Combines can be adjusted to blow out fusarium-damaged kernels which are lighter than healthy kernels to help avoid downgrading losses Thoroughly chop and spread straw to encourage rapid decomposition of residues Sanitize equipment to avoid spreading infested crop residues Control volunteers and grassy weeds Detailed BMPs can be found in the Alberta Fusarium Gramine- arum Management Plan. Relax Zero Tolerance Policy In Alberta industry stakeholders are strongly advocating a loosening of the zero tolerance policy for F. graminearum under the provinces Agricultural Pest Act because they say their ability to access new and innovative varieties that offer higher yields improved agronomic traits and better resistance to diseases such as FHB is being limited if not restricted by the policy. We want our producers to grow the best varieties of wheat and this policy as fusarium continues to march west is start- ing to impact that ability says Tom Steve the Alberta Wheat Commissions general manager. Were starting to get to a point where good quality seed is in short supply if the zero tolerance policy is followed to the letter. F. graminearum was added as a declared pest under the act in 1999 as an attempt to keep it from becoming established in the province. Since then F. graminearum has spread to almost 22 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Brent Derkatch of Canterra Seeds. Tom Steve Alberta Wheat Commission general manager. Lets Grow Together Seed Grain Testing Soil-Borne Disease Analytics DNA Varietal Purity Seed Crop Inspection more www.biovision.ca 1-800-952-5407 seed_testing Sherwood Park Winnipeg Grande Prairie ISO 90012008 registered all regions of Alberta. According to Steve industry stakeholders are in agreement that action needs to be taken. Weve evolved from a position where not many years ago it was felt fusarium could be kept out of the province but now its more of an issue of controlling it. I think it changes the tone of the discussion and the approach he says. Recently the Alberta Fusarium Action Committee proposed changes to the Alberta Fusarium Graminearum Management Plan to designate areas of the province as commonly found or not commonly found. A commonly found designation will apply where 20 per cent of cereal seed samples test positive for F. graminearum collected over three or more consecutive years whereas areas with less than 20 per cent will be considered not commonly found. Seed intended for sowing will be allowed up to a maximum of five per cent F. graminearum incidence level in areas designated commonly found while not commonly found areas will retain the non-detectable levels of F. graminearum. These new designations will shift the focus of preventing establishment of F. graminearum to managing the pathogen in commonly found areas and not commonly found areas will continue with prevention and management options. Steve says the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry is embark- ing on a few significant initiatives to create grower awareness about the need for best management practices to control FHB in addition to a comprehensive two-year F. graminearum survey to determine provincial infection levels. We see leadership on the part of the industry and on the part of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry which is now proactively encouraging best management practices and getting a handle on the infections levels. As the Fusarium Action Committee awaits further direction from the ministry Steve feels confident the change industry stakeholders seek is on the horizon. Im optimistic. We have a fairly broad consensus in the industry the Alberta Seed Growers Association the Alberta Wheat Commission seed development companies who are saying this issue needs to be addressed. From that perspective it would be very difficult for the decision-makers to say no we have to maintain status quo. Kari Belanger We want our producers to grow the best varieties of wheat and this policy as fusarium continues to march west is starting to impact that ability. Tom Steve 23Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 Seed Treaters ScaleWeigh Hoppers Complete USC Automation Universal Pump Stands Tri-Flo Continuous Treating Tube Series Conveyors Walking Legs Vibrating Hoppers Air Operated Bin Gates Dump Re-Bag Hoppers Mix Tanks U-Tote Direct Inject Bin Fill Conveyors Underbin Conveyors Truck Unload Conveyors www.canseedequip.com 332 Packham Ave. Saskatoon SK S7N 2T1 Toll Free 1-800-644-8397 Eye on BiologicalsPhotocreditUSDA 24 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta BIOLOGICAL seed treatments and enhancements have become an increasingly big business in Canada. According to Research and Markets the non-chemical seed treatment market was valued at nearly 5.27 million in 2015 and that number is expected to climb to 8.15 million by 2020. So what exactly is biological seed treatment In laymans terms it involves putting a living organism in most cases bacteria on the seed. The biological agent works by releasing metabolites that possibly inhibit pathogen growth or stimulating the host resist- ance or by competing with the pathogen for space on the seed and preventing the disease from accessing the seedling. In some cases biological treatments can also enhance seedling growth due to a positive interaction with the plant or the fixation of nitrogen. While biologicals are not yet as popular in Alberta as in Eastern Canada according to industry experts there have been some notable successes. Nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria are used on a variety of pulse crops with a 99 per cent treatment rate. In addi- tion some bacterial strains including Bacillis and Pseudomonas have been used as growth promoters in fungicide products such as Kodiak and Serenade while faba bean seed soaked in a suspen- sion of Bacillus megaterium resulted in a reduction of damping-off and root rot caused by R. solani and other root pathogens. Growth No Surprise Russell Trischuk a technical marketing specialist in functional crop care for BASF says hes not surprised by the growing demand for biological treatments. In fact he says the expected growth in the sector was a major factor in BASFs decision to acquire Becker Underwood three years ago. Its kind of the evolution of where agriculture has gone he says. I think were going to see a continual increase in products for different crops. Biologicals fall into four main categories. Each category is very different and they have different places in the environment for agriculture says Gary Harman chief scientific officer for Advanced Biological Marketing an Ohio-based developer manu- facturer and distributor of agricultural biologicals. Microbials Bacteria fungi nematodes protozoa and viruses all living organisms are used in the formulation of microbial products. Many spore forming and non-spore forming bacteria are known to be effective against a wide spectrum of insects and diseases. One of the more notable microbial products is Bacil- AgIndustryKeenon BiologicalEnhancements Biological seed enhancements are enjoying a surge in popularity and that trend is expected to continue for years to come. 25Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 lus thuringiensis Bt which is a spore-forming bacterium that produces toxins that after ingestion cause rapid gut paralysis and death of certain insects especially caterpillars explains Chris Williamson a University of Wisconsin-Madison Extension specialist. Bt is a naturally occurring soil bacterium but chemi- cal manufacturers have developed a process to formulate it and make it commercially available. Biochemicals These are naturally occurring compounds or synthetically derived compounds that are structurally similar and functionally identical to their naturally occurring counterparts. They are characterized by their non-toxic mode of action that might affect the growth and development of a pest its ability to produce or pest ecology. Biochemicals might also have an impact on the growth and development of treated plants including their post-harvest physiology. Biopesticides Also commonly known as biorationals these can be biochemical or microbial. Biorationals improve crop quality and are safe to humans and other non-target organisms says Ted Melnik of Valent BioSciences Corporation a leader in the discovery development manufacturing and commercialization of biorationalproducts. They present suppliers of quality food and fiber with an added degree of flexibility. Biorationals are used in organic as well as conventional production systems and can contribute greatly to the marketability of a crop by creating value that extends all the way to the end-user. Biostimulants The biostimulant industry is improving agricul- tural sustainability and soil health while generating significant new economic growth writes Brian Cornelious Agricen director of applied sciences in a blog post about biostimulants. But the definition of biostimulants is evolving and definitions differ around the world. However there is general consensus that biostimulants are neither pesticides nor fertilizers. Another Tool for Alberta Growers Trischuk says a couple of factors have contributed to the increased demand for biologicals. There werent a lot of new chemically-based innovations discovered in the 1980s and early 1990s he says so microbiologists began investigating biological alternatives and the fruits of those labours are now finally start- ing to come to fruition. Another factor according to Trischuk has been the growing demand by consumers for more natural food products. Aside from using a biological agent such as a bacteria there isnt much difference between the way a biological treatment is applied to a seed compared to a chemically-based treat- ment. Its basically in a carrier thats friendly to living organisms sprayed onto the seed very much the same way a fungicide- based seed treatment would be applied to a plant Trischuk says. One of the newest biological seed treatments to make its way to the Canadian marketplace is Syngenta Canadas Clariva pn the companys first entry into the biologicals market. It was registered for use with soybeans earlier this year and is expected to be available for commercial use in 2016. Clariva pn will provide growers with another tool in the fight against soybean cyst nematodes SCN a worm that attacks the roots of the plant and can have a devastating effect. It works by releasing the Pasteuria nishizawae bacteria into the soil which Your Retailer of Pedigreed Seed Yellow Peas Green Peas Fababeans Flax Wheat Barley Seed Treating Several locations for Spring pick up Direct to Farm delivery available Production Contracts Licensed and Bonded For Seed Inquiries contact Pat Hemminger 403-888-2050 PO Box 6345 Innisfail AB T4G 1T1 For Marketing Inquiries contact Wes Reid 403-227-2774 Christian Chivilo 403-377-8114 For Email Inquiries info wagrain.ca 26 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta creates a protective zone around the plants roots. The nib- bling pest comes into contact with the bacteria in the soil and is eventually killed by it. In trials it has worked best with resistant or moderately resistant varieties. The bacteria is naturally found in the soil in low concentrations. What weve been able to do is grow it out into higher concentra- tions apply it on the seed and within that zone give in-season protection to suppress the SCN says Nathan Klages seed care and inoculants product lead for Syngenta Canada. Klages says the product has proven to be effective in trials conducted in Ontario and the company expects similar results when it becomes commercially available next year. Syngentas marketing efforts for Clariva pn are being concentrated in south- west Ontario for now but Klages says the company has begun testing in Manitoba and it could eventually become an option for Alberta growers. Although SCN is something not thought to be a concern in Alberta researchers like the University of Manitobas Mario Tenuta Canada research chair in applied soil ecology say thats wrong. He says as more growers in Alberta begin to grow soybeans SCN will become a real threat they need to be on the lookout for. Whenever you expand the growing region for soybeans soybean cyst nematode follows shortly afterwards. Thats what weve seen happen south of us in the United States it happened in Ontario and its happening in Quebec now he says. Theres a bit of a delay about a decade or two before you see it causing problems once the crop is introduced. Its a concern for Alberta if theyre going to grow soybean because history tells us it comes along with the crop. BASF currently has two biological treatments available to growers in Western Canada. Nodulator NT which contains Bradyrhizobium japonicum and the MBI600 strain of Bacillus subtilis which provides enhanced nitrogen fixation by increas- ing plant vigour root mass and nodule formation. It also offers Nodulator XL for pea and lentil crops. According to Manas Banerjee CEO of Manitobas XiteBio Technologies traditional inoculants introduce bacteria that must compete against that which is already present in the soil. The concept behind XiteBios products is what Banerjee calls bacterial synergy the process of working with rather than against microbial organisms in the soil to help convert nitrogen to a form plants can use while invigorating the soil by creating a relationship between bacteria already present in that soil and the bacteria the grower is introducing. Our technology takes care of what you have in your soil. It invigorates the natural microflora you have and creates a synergy. Rather than trying to outcompete certain microflora it tries to make a friendship with it. The chance of success is much better that way Banerjee says. Even though biologicals are applied in much the same way as chemical-based treatments there are some significant differ- ences growers should be aware of if they are considering using them. The major difference according to Trischuk is that biological treatments contain living organisms and need to be handled accordingly. Soybean cyst nematode on the roots of a plant. PhotocourtesySyngentaCanada Proper Storage Critical Sheau-Fang Hwang a research scientist in plant pathology with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry agrees that proper storage is critical to maintaining the effectiveness of biological treatments. She also suggests growers be aware of the fact that these treatments may be influenced by conditions such as temperature moisture and so on depending on how favourable these are to the microorganisms involved. This can result in less consistent performance than those associated with chemical treatments. Hwang says one of the upsides to biologicals is that unlike most chemical treatments they will not lose their efficacy because of a build-up of resistance in the pathogen population. Trischuk says he expects the demand for biological seed treat- ments will continue to rise as manufacturers and growers learn more about them. Theres a reason BASF made that 1 billion investment three years ago in Becker Underwood he says. Jim Timlick and Julie Deering Whenever you expand the growing region for soybeans soybean cyst nematode follows shortly afterwards. Mario Tenuta Meridian Seed Tenders First in Innovation Not all Tenders are created equal. Watch our videos online www.meridianmfg.comvideos Find your nearest dealer at meridianmfg.comlocator 2015 Meridian Manufacturing Inc. Registered Trademarks used under License. meridianmfg.com Quality Conveyors Meridians incline and underbin conveyors run smooth and efficient ensuring you spend more time in the field. Practical Design Meridians streamlined hydraulic system means fewer hoses which reduces clutter at the rear of the Tender and improves serviceability. The fuel and hydraulic tanks are also mounted low for easy access. More Control The electronic system of Meridians SR2 Tenders feature a hand-held remote along with an on-board touch screen that provides full access to all functions of the Tender giving you more control and making our products easier to operate and more efficient than ever. But dont take our word for it watch our testimonial videos to see what our customers are saying. Take for example our new Seed Express SR2 Large Tender M eridian Seed Tender s First in Innovation Years of Excellence Seed Treatment Status 28 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta AS of Jan. 1 2017 only seed treatment operations that have successfully completed an audit of the Accredited Seed Treat- ment Operations Standards will be eligible to receive and apply designated seed treatment products. Designated seed treatment products are commercial products designated by Canadian registrants for use in Canada. As new seed treatment products are developed the list of designated commercial products will expand. Only designated commercial products will fall into the category. There will still be on-farm products that anyone can use when the label is followed. Audits are facilitated by the Agrichemical Warehousing Standards Asso- ciation and sites must successfully complete an audit conducted by an accredited AWSA auditor before the January deadline to become accredited. The standards were created by CropLife Canada and its members to provide uniform environmental health and safety practices for the storage and handling of designated commercial seed treatment products in Canada. Pre-audited sites have until Dec. 31 2016 to successfully com- plete a full audit. Sites not audited by that time will lose all grand- fathering privileges. Audit frequency is to be every two years and the audit itself is a combination of mandatory and scored items. Western Canadian seed growers seed cleaning cooperatives and agri-retailers including everyone involved in the commercial application of seed treatment products will be affected by the new standards. If a facility is not in compliance all manufacturing and distribution members of CropLife Canada will be notified to suspend shipments of designated seed treatment products. However meeting the new standards may not be much of a hurdle for many seed treating operations. The vast majority of the industry are doing what were asking within the standards the vast majority of the time. That said its a change management process What were really asking them to do is standardize it or put it in form says Russel Hurst CropLife Canadas executive director of sustainability and stewardship. Hurst has been involved with the creation of the new code since its inception. CropLife Canada organized the steering committee tasked with developing a set of commercial not on-farm seed treatment standards to address a gap in industry stewardship as well as provide consistency surrounding seed treatment activities. Drafted by a multi-stakeholder working group of registrants distributors agri-retailers seed cleaning cooperatives seed growers the Canadian Seed Trade Association and Canadian UptoScratch As seed treatment popularity continues to grow new standards are set to take effect. What are the standards and are seed treaters ready for them Plus what producers should consider when choosing on-farm mobile or commercial seed treatment facilities. As of Jan. 1 2017 only seed treatment operations that have successfully completed an audit of the Accredited Seed Treatment Operations Standards will be eligible to receive and apply designated commercial seed treatment products. kind of canola Its the The Cargill logo VICTORY and VICTORY Hybrid Canola logo are registered trademarks of Cargill Incorporated used under license. Genuity Genuity and Design Genuity Icons Roundup Ready and Roundup are trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC used under license. Always follow grain marketing and all other stewardship practices and pesticide label directions. Details of these requirements can be found in the Trait Stewardship Responsibilities Notice to Farmers printed in this publication. 2015 Cargill Incorporated. All rights reserved. www.victorycanola.com www.cargillag.ca 30 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Seed Institute personnel and relevant provincial and federal government agencies such as the Pest Management Regulatory Agency and Alberta Environment and Parks the standards are a result of industry participation spanning five years. Its been an odyssey says Hurst. We didnt know it would be a five-year implementation pathway. Its been a good pro- cess because it takes longer to implement something when you engage all stakeholders across the entire value chain. A great deal of credit goes to the seed trade and seed grower associations and all the individuals who participated throughout the process We had a lot of not-always-easy conversations but we came together as an industry to determine where we wanted to get to. Simply put Hurst says the group wanted to improve the way seed treatment products are applied and ensure they are applied in accordance with label guidelines. The new system does not mean you have to be certified to treat seed simply that you must be certified in order to receive and apply certain designated products. According to Jeff Daniels DuPont Seed Treatment Enterprises technical agronomy and application lead proper application is essential to treated seed stewardship. Ensuring proper application of seed treatment plays a vital role in the success of the seed as well as the proper stewardship of it he says. Responsible stewardship practices help maintain seed and seed treatment integrity which helps keep the active ingredi- ent on the seed to achieve maximum crop health benefit for the investment he says. Of the standards 76 protocols 66 are existing regulations such as fire code building code occupational health and safety requirements and in some cases provincial pesticide regulations or legislation. We took the best elements of these provincial regulations and put them into a national standard says Hurst. The remaining 10 protocols are essentially best manage- ment practices industry stakeholders felt were important to be included. Its not required by law but as an industry weve determined its a really good thing to do says Hurst. As an industry we can say Here is the standard everybody agrees to the standard now meet or exceed the standard. However a greater degree of variability exists between seed treatment operations with respect to buildings and structures especially between Eastern and Western Canada. Developing standards to account for these differences wasnt an easy pro- cess says Hurst. In terms of building and structure theres a big variability and it really depends on East-versus-West type commodity crops youre treating time that youre treating and volume you typically treat prior to season or just in time. Thats where were seeing the wider swings in terms of what were asking facilities to do he says. Across the Prairies seed growers agri-retailers and seed cleaning cooperatives must decide whether or not to have their facilities audited. If they choose to use products that are on the designated prod- uct list its going to be a business decision for them says Hurst. He suggests seed treatment operators consider the following Do operators anticipate their customers will want products on the designated seed treatment products list to meet their agronomic needs Does an operator want to shape hisher business to be that service provider If operators choose to go through the standardized processes is it going to make them more efficient Will it improve their bottom lines beyond just selling products to their customers Hurst says CropLife Canada and AWSA are providing as much information as possible to operators well ahead of the January 2017 deadline in hopes of eliminating 11th-hour decisions about compliance or non-compliance with the standards. This fall industry stakeholder groups will review and provide We had a lot of not always easy conversations but we came together as an industry to determine where we wanted to get to. Russel Hurst Growing Pedigreed Seed since 1983 Customforageblendsscaleonsitetreatingavailable Richard Hallett 403 586-3769 Dale Hallett 403 899-4166 Office 403 337-2469 E-mail hallettrichardhotmail.com Carstairs Alberta Wheat NEW AAC Penhold AAC Redwater Peas CDC Limerick Oats AC Mustang Barley CDC Copeland CDC Austenson Sundre 31Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 THIS GUY JUST pIcked Up 44MT of perfecTlY TreaTed wHeaT In 38 MInUTeS Search G40 Seed Treater on YouTube and see for yourself. www.seedtreating.com Brian Ellis Phone 403-556-2846 Fax 403-556-6604 gseedtelusplanet.net Search G40 Seed Treater on YouTube feedback on the latest version of the standards before release of the final version. At that time the designated list of seed treat- ment products by registrants will also be available. One sector that will not be affected by the new standards or the designated seed treatment products list is on-farm seed treaters. No grower would ever have access to and never has had access to a seed treatment product intended for commercial use only says Hurst. They would not see a product theyve always had access to all of a sudden show up on the designated list. All being said and done the new standards should provide more comfort to both registrants that their products are being applied and used as they are intended or as the label states they should and the PMRA with respect to environmental health and safety consistency through a third-party audit process says Hurst. Demand for seed treatment products is strong and growing. Producers recognize seed treatments agronomic value but their use and application is still a learning process says Hurst. The standards also address the issue of uniform application of these products. Seed treatments are highly technical and ensur- ing they get placed on the seed in a uniform manner is crucial. For example if half of the seed has 100 per cent of the product and the other side has none producers could run into product performance issues. If the technology is not applied to the seed in the appropriate manner to ensure it works properly growers arent getting the greatest return on their investment and thats not good for our industry. These products are tested for years to ensure that if used appropriately theyll do the job theyre set forward to do says Hurst. With increasing demand for seed treatment products many growers will be evaluating what application methods best fit their operations on-farm commercial or mobile. After growers make the decision to treat their seed they should consider which application method is most convenient and efficient for their operations says Bill Chapman a crop business development specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. On-farm seed treatment systems such as Grahams G3 applicator treats seed uniformly efficiently and effectively says Chapman. One advantage of on-farm systems is once theyre calibrated growers can treat only the seed they need. We saw a large uptake of the G3-type systems in Alberta over the past 10 to 15 years with larger cereal producers because of the conveni- ence of treating only the seed they need and then theyre not storing it he says. Its easy to apply seed treatment at the on-farm level with certain seed for instance small grains says Hurst. Understand what you want to achieve he says. What are you set up for If growers choose to treat their own seed time may be a factor to consider as well as access to the appropriate handling equip- ment. You want to ensure youre treating the seed appropriately. If you can achieve all of that on-farm treating could be a very good scenario says Hurst. When time is of the essence mobile seed treatment applica- tion may be the answer for some growers such as Ag Growth Internationals Storm Seed Treater. Independent dealers have purchased mobile-type treaters that farmers can take to their own farms or treat in the independents yard depending on the setup. The benefit is youve got a bigger faster setup that you 32 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta FMS-2000 NREZS 4000 OPTICAL SORTERS SCREENS OPTICAL SORTERS GRAVITY TABLES OPTICAL SORTERS DRAG SYSTEMS OPTICAL SORTERSOPTICAL SORTERSOPTICAL SORTERS DRAG SYSTEMS BUCKET ELEVATORSBUCKET ELEVATORSBUCKET ELEVATORS GRAIN CLEANERS From Start to Finish Weve Got it Handled OPTICAL SORTERS SCREENS OPTICAL SORTERS SCREENS GRAVITY TABLESGRAVITY TABLES OPTICAL SORTERS GRAVITY TABLES MAINTENANCE CREWS GRAIN CLEANERSGRAIN CLEANERS PLANT DESIGN www.flamangraincleaning.com Call Alastair Truesdale at 1.306.717.1659 alastair.truesdaleflaman.com SCREENS Protein Moisture Analyzers BUCKET ELEVATOR CUPS REPLACEMENT PARTS IN STOCK SATAKE OLIVER CARTER DAY 1.306.717.1659 Protein Protein Oliver Seed Treaters SCREENSSCREENSSCREENS BELTING SeedTreatments YoureintheDriversSeat Applyingseedtreatmentsisessentialforseedprotectionduringtheearlystages ofgrowthaswellasformaximizingcropyieldsaysBillChapmanacropbusiness developmentspecialistwithAlbertaAgricultureandForestry. Seedtreatmentisliketheautomatictransmissionuidinyourcar.Itssomething thatsrequiredtorunthattransmission.Allthenutsboltsandsteelwontgovery farunlessyouvegottransmissionuidinyourcarhesays.Itspartoftheprocess. Itcaneliminatemanysurface-bornediseases. Whetheryoureusingcertiedorbinrunseedtreatingthatseedisessential. Itsimportanttotreatyourseedaspartofthediseasemanagementprocesssays Chapman.Itscriticalweallthinkseriouslyabouttreatingseedwhetherits wheatorbarleyespeciallyfordiseaseslikefusariumheadblight.Therearemany producersgrowingtheirownseedwhomighthaveoneortwopercentfusariumin theirsampleandifyourereplantingititsgoingtomultiplyexponentially. Inadditionseedtreatmentsofferextraprotectiontoseedlingswhichareoften plantedinunfavourableconditionsintherstfewweeks.Thusgettingthecrop offtoagoodstartandmaximizingyieldhesays. Anotherwordofcautionduringseedtreatingtimeistocleanouttrucksand equipmentbetweenmovingtreatedseedandmovinggrain.Youvegottomake suretheresnotreatedseedgettingintothegrainhandlingsystemsaysChapman. Calibrateallequipmentaccuratelyandhandleseedtreatmentsandtreatedseed carefullywhilewearingappropriatesafety-approvedglovesandfootwearheadds. can quickly treat your seed with says Chapman. Growers looking for efficiencies in their operations may want to consider com- mercial seed treaters. Theyre calibrating equipment monitoring their application rates theyve got fully-trained staff and use proper safety equipment. If you dont like handling treated seed and doing all the work yourself you can easily book your seed through a seed plant. Its very convenient order everything up take it home and store it in your seed bin says Chapman. In addition to convenience quality con- trol and efficiency growers may benefit from commercial seed treaters expertise especially with more complicated seed treatment mixtures such as fungicide- insecticide combinations micronutrients or growth stimulants says Hurst. However when it comes to seed treat- ment application and the bottom line for producers its not how they apply it but that they apply it says Chapman. Kari Belanger www.richardson.ca Contact your local Richardson Pioneer Ag Business Centre. Book Your 2016 Seed Today. PIONEER FOR THE SALE AND DISTRIBUTION OF SEED IS A REGISTERED TRADE-MARK OF PIONEER HI-BRED INTERNATIONAL INC. AND IS USED UNDER LICENSE BY THE UNAFFILIATED COMPANY RICHARDSON PIONEER LIMITED. Youre not just buying seed youre investing in your business. Choosing the right product is only part of your success. You know that knowledge and experience are what help businesses grow. Richardson Pioneer Ag Business Centres give you access to more than todays best seeds. Were here to help you increase your yields and profitability with expert advice and end-to-end service. From crop planning to grain marketing were focused on supporting you at every stage of growth. Get more than top varieties. Partner with a prairie-wide network of agronomic advisors committed to giving your operation the advantage it deserves. Status Soybeans Relatively new as a crop rotation tool in Alberta soybeans are becoming a lucrative option for growers in the province. IT all comes down to choosing the right variety for your farm according to experts who are working towards developing and promoting the use of soybeans in crop rotations in Alberta. According to Alberta Agricultures Ron Gietz this crop should be considered by producers looking to expand their farm invest- ments. Soybeans are a viable option to producers because they reduce nitrogen costs says Gietz. You also need to choose the right variety based on heat units and what will be a good match for your particular growing area. While Gietz notes that researchers and companies within the province are working on developing soybean varieties suited to Albertas varying climate he expects adoption to increase as more varieties come to market over the next few years. Its important to have varieties that are more suited to Albertas growing conditions which are very different from neighbouring Saskatchewan and Manitoba. We have found that growing the right variety suited to Alberta growing conditions is just as profitable as in other provinces. Gietz notes that crop researchers in Brooks Alta. are conduct- ing soybean research with promising results. The benefits are enormous says Gietz. Ongoing research is essential to help fill a niche by offering another option in crop rotations by filling a non-grain placement in the rotation lineup. He adds that with soybeans beginning to be mixed into produc- ers rotations they are also seeing Alberta companies making investments within the province to accommodate soybean supplies. Jim Everson executive director with Soy Canada says his organization is very excited not only about current ongoing research projects underway in Alberta but the growing presence of soybeans in Canada overall. We are excited to see acreage in Saskatchewan Manitoba and Ontario growing says Everson. Expanding acreage has led to further research development on the Prairies and this will only bolster and expand where soybeans are grown in Canada. Because of this expanded research and new shorter-season variety development Everson says that soybeans may be worth another look for Alberta growers. GETTING SERIOUS ABOUT SOYBEANS 34 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta This year is the first in which soybeans now qualify for Agricultural Financial Service crop insurance coverage in certain growing regions of the province. Meridian SmoothWall The Gold Standard in Quality Not all bins are created equal. Watch our videos online www.meridianmfg.comvideos Find your nearest dealer at meridianmfg.comlocator 2015 Meridian Manufacturing Inc. Registered Trademarks used under License. meridianmfg.com High Capacity Meridian offers a true 18 SmoothWall bin for your storage needs. The seamless interior results in a long-lasting bin thats easy to unload without the need for additional clean out. Incredibly Durable Our powder coat finish has twice the salt spray rating of regular powders and has superior adhesion ensuring a smooth long-lasting finish over all seams and smooth surfaces. Versatile Our bins offer top quality storage for a wide variety of products including grain seed feed and fertilizer. High Resale Value Because you dont need to take them apart for transportation our SmoothWall bins have a high resale value. But dont take our word for it watch our testimonial videos to see what our customers are saying. Take for example our 18 SmoothWall Hopper bin 36 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Indepth Research Manjula Bandara pulse and special crops research scientist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry at the Crop Diversifica- tion Centre South in Brooks has been conducting research for the past decade to find the well-suited soybean genotypes for Alberta growers particularly for the southern region. Bandara notes that this research has involved collaborating not only with various seed companies but also alongside provincial agricultural production and processing organizations. From Ontario to Alberta research has been on-going in side-by-side with field trials he says. While Manitoba grows roughly 1.3 million acres of soybeans each year and Saskatchewan grows approximately 300000 acres Alberta only grew roughly 10000 acres last year. Bandara hopes that his research will help to increase acreage numbers in Alberta and produce new varieties adaptable to the province. Soybeans need to be able to compete with other existing crops in order to be considered in crop rotations says Bandara. Bandaras current project began two years ago and will continue for the next two years. He and colleagues are conduct- ing soybean research in southern Alberta under supplementary irrigation. Its a major challenge to find the right variety for Albertas vary- ing climate. Bandara points to several main areas that he and his team are working on for varietal selection within the province 1. Finding the most suitable genotypes 2. Determining the optimum amount and frequency of irriga- tion at the appropriate growth stage 3. Seeding density and row spacing 4. Important diseases that influence seed yield and quality of soybeans growing under supplementary irrigation in Alberta 5. Determine difference in yieldsoil advantage to competitive crops such as dry bean While his research has another two years of funding Bandara plans to take the information from his research and place it into a workable manual of guidelines for producers in the province who want to expand their crop rotations. We are excited to see acreage in Saskatchewan Manitoba and Ontario growing Jim Everson It all comes down to choosing the right variety for your farm according to experts who are working towards developing and promoting the use of soybeans in crop rotations in Alberta. 37Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 WHEREON THE WEB To access Alberta Agricultures report titled The Potential for Soybeans in Alberta go to httpgoo.gljG5Lyy Soybean Potential Growing Bandara and Tilley-based soybean grower and pedigreed seed producer Patrick Fabian are conducting large-scale field trials at Fabians farm on soybean seeding density and row spacing. Fabian has been growing soybeans on his farm for the past eight years and is proud to be working with Bandara to find the right varieties and agricultural practices that would enable Alberta producers to grow soybeans profitably. The industry has come a long way with new varieties and agronomy standards to where I can yield in the mid-to-high 50 bushel-per-acre area says Fabian. Fabian notes that this year is the first in which soybeans now qualify for Agricultural Financial Service Crop insurance coverage in certain growing regions of the province. Crop insurance is a definite bonus when considering your crop rotation and this is an incentive to grow soybeans. While Fabian notes that the availability of insurance is promis- ing he feels the ongoing research is very important to lending more validity to growing the crop within the province. Research is key to providing credibility that soybeans can be productive and profitable to grow in our region of the Prairies he adds. Line companies are also seeing the advantage of growing soy- beans in Alberta since we are already halfway to the West Coast and growers last year saw a freight advantage of 1.40 price premium compared to Manitoba. However Fabian notes that producers do need to use caution as a fall frost can greatly impact yield potential. Soybeans have a low input cost add nitrogen to the soil and help to clean up a field for a high-value crop the following year. To me thats a win win situation. More Work Ahead Bandara has future plans of further research into soybeans in the province. He hopes to conduct further testing across the Prairies looking at not only yield but chemical makeup as well. Further research on appearance and chemical composition is important says Bandara. We hope to conduct testing on oil content protein profile and meal quality. According to Gietz and Fabian independent and unbiased research is necessary to keep momentum for this crop into the future. Its important to understand the costbenefit of the crop on individual farms says Gietz. Varietal development will help to bring shorter-season soybean varieties to Alberta which are better suited to growing conditions and will be the best match to a specific growing region. Fabian hopes to only see increased adoption of soybeans by producers in Alberta as a viable profitable and affordable crop. Profitable returns will only help to make soybeans competitive within crop rotations on farms and this is where continued research is necessary. Shannon Schindle Bee Bulletin 38 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta BEES are an essential component of Canadian agriculture with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada recently pegging the value of honeybees to crop pollination in this country at more than 4.4 billion. In recent years concerns have been raised in Canada and around the world about bee population declines and long-term pollinator health prompting questions about the sustainability of the Canadian honeybee industry. Figures from Statistics Canada however indicate the number of honeybees in this country has been rising over the past decade. The amount of bee colonies rose from 615541 in 2005 to 694217 in 2014 an increase of almost 13 per cent. The numbers have been rising in Alberta as well with bee colonies in the province numbering 282000 in 2014 a 12 per cent increase from 2005. We have more hives maybe more than weve ever had before says Grant Hicks president of the Alberta Beekeepers Commission. He estimates the total number of hives in the prov- ince currently to be very close to 300000. Hicks adds the El Nino weather pattern that the province expe- rienced this past year helped boost the numbers because milder winters enable hives to flourish. Lee Townsend who operates TLPR Honey Farms in Stony Plain Alta. agrees the number of bees in Alberta is as high as its ever been. He says growing demand for pollinator services for crops like canola and blueberries in Alberta and across Canada as well as more demand for honey worldwide are among the reasons why. Townsend says there are also more beekeepers and bigger pollinator businesses in Alberta. According to StatsCan there were 930 beekeepers in Alberta in 2014 which is 200 more than a decade earlier. Rod Scarlett the executive director of the CHC cites a number of other factors behind the honeybee growth trend including better bee stock improved hive management and an enhanced understanding of bee diseases and pests like Varroa mite. He says advances in recent years have enabled both beekeepers and grow- ers to get a better handle on managing risks to bee health. We have a few more tools in the tool kit Scarlett explains citing integrated pest management as one of those tools. According to Statistics Canada this critical pollinator has been increasing in number in Alberta and across the country. According to Hicks a miticide product thats been widely used in Alberta since 2007 has been 95 per cent effective against Varroa mite which has enabled beekeepers to successfully control the pest. Neonicotinoid insecticide-treated seed and its impact on pollinator health have come under increasing scrutiny in recent years. Scarlett acknowledges theres a growing awareness in the agricultural community of the need for pesticide risk reduction and management practices that should benefit honeybees in the long run. The whole farm community which includes beekeepers is taking a good look at the use of pesticides he says. Its a part of the piece of the puzzle. HoneybeesontheRise Figures from Statistics Canada indicate the number of honeybees in this country has been rising over the past decade. 39Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 Townsend maintains the use of pesticide-treated seed hasnt been a big problem for Alberta beekeepers. Weve yet to see an issue with it he says adding its incumbent on growers and beekeepers alike to ensure theyre following best practices for handling treated seed. Hicks says the use of pesticide-treated seed in canola produc- tion in Alberta hasnt had an adverse effect on bee health in the province due to good stewardship by growers and enhancements in dust-reduction technology. Treated seed is the most benign method of insect control in terms of threat to honeybees Hicks says. Health Canada lists a number of factors that impact the risk of toxic pesticide exposure to pollinators including the use of treated seed type of planting equipment planting conditions flowering resources i.e. crops weeds and trees and bee yard locations. It has devised a set of best management practices BMPs that growers can follow to reduce the risk to bees and other insect pollinators from exposure to dust from treated seed. According to Health Canada these BMPs provide a toolbox of options that should be used in combination wherever possible. Highlights of Health Canadas good stewardship practices for pollinator protection and the responsible use of insecticide-treated seed are as follows Follow Pesticide Label and Seed Tag Directions In order to minimize risks to human health and the environment always read and adhere to directions for use on pesticide product labels or on treated seed labels related to personal protective equipment and buffer zones for example. Practice Integrated Pest Management Practicing integrated pest management when choosing seed treat- ments is essential for sustainable pest control. This approach can include cultural practices to discourage pests for example crop rotation as well as correctly identifying pest problems and risk factors before making a decision to use treated seed. Use insecti- cide treated seed only when necessary if insecticide treatment is required use the lowest effective seed treatment rate. Communicate with Beekeepers Communication and co-operation among growers custom opera- tors and beekeepers on the timing of planting treated seed and the location of hives can help reduce the risk of bee incidents. This communication will enable growers to know which fields have hives located close by and provide advance notice to beekeepers of planting intentions. This in turn will allow beekeepers to ensure hives are located strategically take actions to temporarily protect or relocate hives where feasible and ensure clean water sources are provided. Recognize Pollinator Habitat and Reduce Dust Exposure Bees collect pollen and nectar from flowering crops trees and weeds as well as water from puddles and moist soil in or beside fields. Pollinators can be exposed to treated seed dust when it is carried in the air or deposited on food and water sources. It is important to monitor environmental conditions as pollinator exposure may be increased under very dry andor windy condi Heavily podded Greatyield Strong stalk Excellent harvestability Branch support Keepstheplant uprightunderahigh yieldload Heavily podded support Keepstheplant uprightunderahigh Strong harvestability Client BrettYoung Publication Alberta Seed Guide Agency ON Comm Visitbrettyoung.ca 1-800-665-5015 1 6074RRreportedanaverageof109ofcheckDKL73-75inallzones.Seewww.canolaperformancetrials.comforcompletetrialresults. BrettYoungTM is a trademark of Brett-Young Seeds Limited. Monsanto Company is a member of Excellence Through Stewardship ETS. MonsantoproductsarecommercializedinaccordancewithETSProductLaunchStewardshipGuidanceandincompliancewithMonsantosPolicy for Commercialization of Biotechnology-Derived Plant Products in Commodity Crops. Commercialized products have been approved for import into key export markets with functioning regulatory systems. Any crop or material produced from this product can only be exported to or used processed or sold in countries where all necessary regulatory approvals have been granted. It is a violation of national and international law to move material containing biotech traits across boundaries into nations where import is not permitted. Growers should talk to their grain handler or product purchaser to confirm their buying position for this product. Excellence Through Stewardship is a registered trademark of Excellence ThroughStewardship.ALWAYSREADANDFOLLOWPESTICIDELABELDIRECTIONS.RoundupReady cropscontaingenesthatconfertolerance to glyphosate the active ingredient in Roundup brand agricultural herbicides. Roundup brand agricultural herbicides will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Genuity and Design Genuity Roundup Ready Roundup are registered trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC MonsantoCanadaInc.licensee.5032 1015 Introducing 6074 RR and 6080 RR - the NEW standards in Genuity Roundup Ready Canola performance. 6074 RR was the highest yielding GENRR in the 2014 Canola Performance Trials1 . 6080 RR has all the yield potential of 6074 RR and earlier maturity. Look for trial results this fall for both of these varieties. Be sure to get your orders in for these two exceptional varieties. Just another example of world-class products provided to you from your local seed company. 6074RR6080RR Industry-leading yield and harvestability Setting NewStandards TELLUSABOUTYOUREXPERIENCEWITHBrettYoungCANOLA BY_Seeds BYCanola15 tions that favour dust transport. Avoid planting treated seed under these conditions if flowering plants standing water or bee colo- nies are located downwind and follow best practices to reduce dust exposure. Control flowering weeds in the field before plant- ing so that pollinators are not attracted to in-field forage. Avoid Generating Dust when Handling Treated Seed Handle treated seed bags with care during transport loading and unloading in order to reduce abrasion dust generation and spill- age. Do not load or clean seeding equipment near bee colonies and avoid places where bees may be foraging such as flowering crops trees or weeds. When turning on the seeder avoid engag- ing the system where dust may contact honeybee colonies or foraging pollinators. Manage Planting Equipment to Reduce Dust Drift Growers should take care to reducecontrol dust containing insec- ticide that is exhausted from seeders. Always follow directions pro- vided by planting equipment manufacturers and keep up-to-date on new use practices. Clean and maintain planting equipment regularly including the fan housing and hoppers of air-assisted planters. Use deflector equipment where appropriate to direct exhaust to the ground level thereby reducing dust drift. Use Appropriate Seed Flow Lubricant Although they are not widely utilized in the West seed flow lubricants may affect the generation of dust during planting so its important to carefully follow the use directions for dust-reducing fluency agents. When using a seed flow lubricant for planting corn or soybean seed treated with neonicotinoid insecticides clothiani- din thiamethoxam or imidacloprid only a dust-reducing fluency agent is permitted to minimize the potential for abrasion that produces insecticidal seed dust.It is not permitted to use talc and graphite as a seed flow lubricant for corn or soybean seed treated with these insecticides. Ensure Proper Clean-up and Disposal Take care when cleaning up after planting seed and follow provin- cialmunicipal disposal requirements. Spilled or exposed seeds and dust must be incorporated into the soil or cleaned up from the soil surface. Keep treated seed and dust away from surface water. Do not leave empty seed bags or leftover treated seed in fields or the environment and participate in collection programs for seed bags where they are available. Report Suspected Pollinator Pesticide Poisonings Contact the appropriate federalprovincial authority in the case of any pollinator poisonings that may be related to planting of treated seed. See the Health Canada pollinator protection webpage for appropriate federal and provincial contacts and for additional information. According to Hicks following Health Canadas good steward- ship practices for pollinator protection benefits both growers and beekeepers. These BMPs were developed co-operatively to maximize risk reduction to beneficial insects he says. Following these BMPs will be profitable to both farmers and beekeepers. Mark Halsall WHEREON THE WEB See the Health Canada pollinator protection webpage for appropriate federal and provincial contacts and for additional information. hc-sc.gc.cacps-spcpestagri-commercepollinators-pollinisateurs index-eng.php ProductCampaignNameWeb DateProducedOctober2011 PublicationSeed.AbTypeLive3.25x7.125 SEC_WEB11_E Genes on-line.Genes on-line. For genes that fit your farm visit www.secan.comwww.secan.com Genes that fit your farm is a registered trademark of SeCan. SEC_WEB11_E_SeCan_Web_SA.qxd 10711 348 PM Page 1 The whole farm community which includes beekeepers is taking a good look at the use of pesticides. Rod Scarlett 40 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta With over 30 years of experience designing and manufacturing seed handling systems Convey-All is the logical choice for your bulk seed site. Do you require an individual component or a complete system for your outside storage yard or inside your plant Our equipment are designed to handle delicate seeds and reduce cross contamination. from With Convey-All you get peace of mind because all our products include Complete custom design fabrication installation and after sale services In-plant and storage yard systems Capacities to match your exact requirements Seed treating and other systems are compatible and can be incorporated Ideal for bulk seed plants Conveyors available for any application - capacities from 3000 buhr to 12000 buhr - also lengths from 35 to 120 feet Full line of portable and commercial seed tenders Call 1.800.418.9461 or register at www.convey-all.com Contact us now for prebooking yourSpring Seedsite Packageand receive an early booking discount INNOVATIVE QUALITY SOLUTIONS BULK SEED SYSTEMS Roundtable ROUNDUP Ready alfalfa seed created and marketed by Forage Genetics International FGI is now available commer- cially in the United States. Its also approved for sale in Canada as well but FGI has made the decision to hold off on commercial sales of the herbicide-tolerant genetically modified alfalfa despite the fact that it was granted full food feed and environmental approval by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency in 2005. Tests are underway in Eastern Canada involving select growers to determine how well the product performs. However FGI cur- rently has no plans to launch the product commercially anywhere in Canada. A push is on led by Forage Seed Canada to keep Western Canada free of GM alfalfa. Forage Seed Canada is concerned growers will lose export markets that will not accept any traces of GM alfalfa in imported hay and seed. FGI will not sell traits in Canada this year says Mike Peterson Forage Genetics International global traits lead. No decisions have been made by FGI as to whether we will sell alfalfa traits in Canada in 2016 or beyond. This year the company expanded on-farm field trials with farmers in Ontario and Quebec adding eight growers for a total of 20 farm cooperators. According to feedback gathered from farmers in the 2014 trial program Roundup Ready alfalfa deliv- ers outstanding weed control superior crop safety quick stand establishment and vigorous growth. We spoke to representatives of three groups regarding the issue to get their take on the situation and what may happen in the future. Opinions continue to be split on the issue of genetically modified herbicide- tolerant alfalfa in Canada. The GM Alfalfa Situation Three Perspectives 42 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Bright golden yellow as far as the eye can see. Now thats the mark of a truly successful canola crop. But when you plant with seeds treated with LumidermTM youll see the benefits of flea beetle and cutworm protection long before the first hints of yellow begin to grace your fields.Thats because LumidermTM helps get your crop off to a better start. And a better start means a better harvest. Ask your seed supplier to include LumidermTM on your 2016 canola seed order. Visit lumiderm.dupont.ca. DuPontTM LumidermTM is a DuPontTM LumigenTM seed sense product. As with all crop protection products read and follow label instructions carefully. Member of CropLife Canada. Unless indicated trademarks with TM or SM are trademarks of DuPont or affiliates. 2015 DuPont. insecticide seed treatment DuPont Lumiderm BETTER START. BETTER HARVEST. Forage Seed Canada president Heather Kerschbaumer is a pedigreed seed grower along with her husband John. Together they operate Golden Acre Seeds in Fairview Alta. Golden Acre Seeds produces both conventional and organic seed. Kerschbaumer and Forage Seed Canada which represents provincial forage seed associations are strong advocates for keeping Western Canada free of Roundup Ready GM alfalfa until such a time that export markets like the Middle East Mexico China Japan and South America become more accepting of the presence of GM material in shipments of alfalfa. Currently they want forage seed and hay thats free of traces of GM material. Kerschbaumer has firsthand experience having shipments of seed either rejected or reduced in value as a result of GM mate- rial being found in it and fears that those export markets will be lost if GM alfalfa is grown in Western Canada. Earlier this year she lost a sale of clover seed to Europe due to the presence of some GM canola seeds in the shipment despite the fact it was certified organic. Until the rest of the world accepts GMO crops why would we want to totally abandon our export markets she says. Were not opposed to the technology we just dont want to be con- taminated. But how do you build a wall to ensure contamination doesnt happen Although a wall cannot be built to protect growers who dont want GM alfalfa traits making their way into their fields via pollination the idea of coexistence has been proposed by some. The Canadian Seed Trade Association has developed a coexist- ence plan for Eastern Canada which includes best management practices. A list of these best management practices is available at cdnseed.org under Facilitating Choice Through Coexistence. As far as Forage Seed Canada is concerned our coexistence strategy for Western Canada is simply this we cannot coexist Kerschbaumer says. For example its hard not to find GM canola anymore or crops you can grow side by side without the fear of contamination. But its different with canola canola doesnt grow in ditches and cross-pollinate with something three miles away. With alfalfa seed you see that all the time. We need to keep the integrity of non GM alfalfa safe and its our position that we cannot do that if were growing GM alfalfa in close proximity to non-GM alfalfa. Forage Seed Canada released a position paper on the issue. In it FSC says it opposes the release of GM alfalfa in Western Canada until a strong identity preservation system for alfalfa varieties is in place in Canada a rapid cost-effective sensitive accurate test based on each export markets specific requirements for the specific transgene is available issues including legal or fiduciary pertaining to responsibil- ity liability loss of markets insurance and consequences of contamination are clarified a current economic impact assessment on how the product would impact forage seed markets is done a liability clause is in place to compensate affected stakehold- ers fully for lost seed markets due to contamination by gene transfer FULLY ACCREDITED SEED LAB NO. 1215 EMPLOYEE OWNED OPERATED CALL US TODAY 1-866-980-8324 ofceseedcheck.net www.seedcheck.net Like us on Seed Testing is our Passion Seed Check Technologies was born from a true desire to provide a seed testing laboratory based on Integrity Consistent Reliability Outstanding Customer Service. Bill Brown has seen Roundup Ready alfalfa up close and per- sonal. Hes helping oversee trials in Ontario where around a dozen growers are growing the crop on small plots on a contract basis. He says while the jury is still out on whether or not it will actu- ally be commercially available in Ontario he says the response so far has been good among those who have seen it perform. The nice part is shortly after the plant comes out of the ground they can go in and spray their glyphosate. In the past they had to use other products like Embutox that were hard on the alfalfa he says. With Roundup Ready alfalfa theyre finding theres no setback at all. Its getting all the weeds while other products didnt get every weed that was there. Theyre getting better production and a good-looking field of alfalfa. Thats on the positive side. A downside is there are still quite a few growers in Ontario that put grass with their alfalfa mixtures as well he notes and glypho- sate would kill the grasses. 44 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Bill Brown Field Sales Agronomist GROWMARK Kitchener Ontario Heather Kerschbaumer President Forage Seed Canada Fairview Alberta is available on the following canola varieties For more information visit useJumpStart.ca JumpStart InVigor L120 InVigor L130 InVigor L150 InVigor L159 InVigor 5440 InVigor L135C InVigor L241C InVigor L242 InVigor L261 InVigor L156H InVigor L157H InVigor L140P 45H29 RR 45H31 RR 45S54 RR 46H75 CL 45H76 CL 45S56 RR 45H33 RR 46M34 D3153 RR D3154S RR D3155C RR 74-44 BL 74-45 RR 75-65 RR 75-57 CR 1012 RR 1020 RR 2012 CL 1022 RR 2020 CL 2022 CL 6060 RR 6056 CR 6080 RR 6044 RR 6076 CR 5535 CL 5525 CL 6074 RR SY4135 SY4114 SY4157 SY4105 SY4166 PV 530 G PV 531 G PV 533 G VT 500 G PV 200 CL VR 9560 CL VR 9562 CL Xceed X121 CL CS2000 CS2100 CS2200 CL CANTERRA 1990 V12-1 V12-3 V22-1 Bragging rights. NOW for less than 5 per acre. on pre-treated seed only ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS. For pre-treated seed only. Based on the 2016 published SRP of 49.50 for JumpStart inoculant in a pre-treated bag of canola. 1 bag canola 10 acres. 163 independent large-plot trials in Canada between 1994 and 2013. Individual results may vary and performance may vary from location to location and from year to year. This result may not be an indicator of results you may obtain as local growing soil and weather conditions may vary. Growers should evaluate data from multiple locations and years whenever possible. JumpStart and Monsanto BioAg and Design are trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC. Monsanto Canada Inc licensee. 2015 Monsanto Canada Inc. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners. 1403-1 09.15 JumpStart delivers enhanced phosphate availability for increased root growth and a larger leaf area. For a canola crop you can be proud of order your seed pre-treated with JumpStart inoculant. In 163 farmer-conducted trials canola treated with JumpStart showed an average 6 increased yield over untreated canola. Quicker start stronger finish. Dont wait order your seed pre-treated with JumpStart today. Nature. Its powerful technology. JumpStart Selecting the right corn seed for your soil conditions is pivotal for a high yield high profit potential crop. Well help custom select the seed you need for maximum growing success. First in the Corn Field FirstFirst G E N E R AT I O N S O F B E I N G QUARRY SEED 888-274-9243 www.thunderseed.ca Its a good product but at this point the response has been tempered. How do we add grasses and still be able to use glypho- sate on alfalfa Some people are looking at controlling those early weeds and coming back and maybe putting grass into the stand in early fall if they want grass in it he says. In Ontario we have large dairy producers who use straight alfalfa so I think thats where a lot of the interest is rather than from the haymakers who like to see grass in there. Brown is aware of the coexistence debate in Western Canada and says the biggest issue he foresees in Eastern Canada is organic farmers being concerned about possible contamination from GM alfalfa. Right now he says the crop is being grown in Ontario strictly for hay and not seed meaning cross-pollination cannot occur. We dont have a lot of hay exports here most of it is sold for livestock feed or it gets shipped south for horses. The main users here have no issue with it. But he adds it is important to take everyones point of view into consideration and eyes are on the result of the coexistence discussion in Western Canada. But he adds as new traits are stacked with the GM alfalfa the product will almost certainly become more attractive to growers as it evolves. There may be more movement forward at that point in time. Weve experienced the same thing with corn soybeans canola and sugarbeets. Until the export markets accept them its only a matter of time before it is available. We want our producers to be competitive not only with world markets but also with our neigh- bours to the south and if they have a competitive advantage in the U.S. then we cant compete as well as we otherwise could. Dave Carey CSTA manager of policy initiatives says there are a few misconceptions around the GM alfalfa trait as it has received approval and varieties have been registered. When we had the coexistence planning workshop for alfalfa hay in Eastern Canada there were some groups that came think- ing it was an opportunity to stop the regulatory process but CSTA is not a regulatory body and it had already received full CFIA approval Carey says. At this point its a business decision of Forage Genetics International. Carey says it is important to note that current discussion sur- rounding the commercial release of Roundup Ready alfalfa are for hay production and not for seed production. According to Forage Genetics International the company has no intention of selling seed for anything but hay production in Eastern Canada. 46 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Dave Carey Manager of Policy Initiatives Canadian Seed Trade Association Crosby Devitt Executive Director Canadian Seed Trade Association WHAT A STORY. Times change your farm grows yet Proven Seed is still a strong dependable brand that growers can count on. From our first commercial seed varieties including Delta canola Derby oats Stein barley and Heinrichs alfalfa to our new high-performing genetics in canola cereals and forages thank you for 25 years of growing and succeeding alongside Proven Seed in Western Canada. provenseed.ca Proven Seed is a registered trademark of Crop Production Services Canada Inc. CPS CROP PRODUCTION SERVICES and Design is a registered trademark of Crop Production Services Inc. STILL PROVEN 25 years The cutting-edge quality of CANTERRA SEEDS pedigreed seed is rivalled by only one thing our vast selection. Our portfolio strengthens each year as new varieties are added from our deep product pipeline. This is quality in quantity catered specifically to you. STRENGTH IN NUMBERS. Available only at select retailers. CANTERRA.COM ACisanofficialmarkusedunderlicensefromAgricultureandAgri-FoodCanada Additional work on coexistence has been ongoing with a commitment from FGI and CSTA to develop a Hay-to-Hay Coexistence Plan for Western Canada. The goal is to have this plan completed by January 2016 Peterson says. The plan for Western Canada is in response to requests for additional stew- ardship actions that address the possibility of product moving from OntarioQuebec to Western Canada. At this time FGI does not have plans to introduce biotech-enhanced alfalfa traits to growers in Western Canada. CSTA defines coexistence as A framework that guides the implementation of stewardship and best management practices to be employed in order for three production systems organic conventional and GM to successfully coexist. The value of a coexistence plan is critical as biotech alfalfa moves closer to market says Crosby Devitt CSTA executive direc- tor. The owner of the technology and the varieties sees this as a critical component before going to market because no one in the value chain wants to see one person doing something that negatively affects other stakeholders. The organic hay producers who are not interested in the tech- nology should be able to coexist and run their business as they see fit. And thats the challenge but its also the opportunity. Were striving for a successful coexistence plan that is collabora- tively developed and accepted by all stakeholders. Carey and Devitt want to be clear Coexistence planning and the commercialization of Roundup Ready alfalfa is not a regulatory issue it was approved in 2005 after it underwent livestock feed environmental safety and food assessments conducted by the CFIA and Health Canada. Marc Zienkiewicz and Julie McNabb 48 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Its a good product but at this point the response has been tempered. How do we add grasses and still be able to use glyphosate on alfalfa Bill Brown For advertising opportunities email advertisingissuesink.com or call 1-877-710-3222 Introducing Alberta Seed Guides NEW WEBSITE Enhanced user experience with responsive design Easy-to-navigate menu options Complete industry events calendar Timely seed industry news Exciting new advertising options Visit us on any device to access all the industry news that Alberta Seed Guide has to offer. SEED.AB.CA 50 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Examining Crop Rotation THE numbers speak for themselves. Short-duration canola rotations such as canola-wheat are most profitable for western Canadian producers under certain conditions. Net returns are as high for one-in-two canola as for longer rotations when the price of canola is high relative to other options and when youre using a disease-resistant variety and the resistance is working says Murray Hartman an oilseed specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestrys Food and Bio- Industrial Crops Branch. Farmers are businesspeople he says and they wouldnt be if they werent making money. And while Hartman encourages producers to do whats right for their farm operations which often involves focusing on short-term profit higher returns from shorter rotations may mean trade-offs down the road. I cant fault producers for saying my focus is two or three years net returns and 10 years from now is a very small focus for me. They make their decisions and thats the right decision he says. Despite decreased yields of up to 20 per cent short-duration canola rotations still pencil out ahead of longer ones. Producers also attach value to the short rotations simplicity as theres only two crops to manage and they dont have to worry about mixing things in the bin. However focus on short-term profitability may be short-sighted. Youre opening yourself up for long-term pain... If we get new pests and new strains and resistance breeding or crop protec- tion products havent kept up youre going to have to grow something else because we cant control these things in canola says Hartman. You might not grow canola well at all in 10 years. Increased Disease Research studies and surveys indicate short-duration rotations increase disease prevalence how often a disease is found and incidence how many plants are infected in a field. Over the past 15 years short rotations have resulted in a strong trend toward increased disease prevalence and incidence of blackleg root rots and clubroot for example. Which in turn puts pressure on disease-resistant traits and crop protection products such as seed treatment fungicides. FindingMiddleGround Short crop rotations continue in popularity and profitability. Meanwhile disease and pest pressure is on the rise as is stress on disease- and pest-resistant traits and crop protection products from pushing rotations. If short-term gain means long-term pain wheres the middle ground Murray Hartman oilseed specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestrys Food and Bio-Industrial Crops Branch. If disease increases yield may be affected to some extent but not enough to trouble producers says Hartman. However if the durability of a disease-resistant trait is also overcome for exam- ple if clubroot resistance is completely bypassed by the pathogen because the pathogen has shifted to a different pathotype then were back to square one says Hartman. We dont have any good resistance and its a pretty sizable yield loss when that new strain takes over. Breeders in other countries discovered clubroot resistance was only efficacious for up to three crops and then the pathogens shifted and the resistance did not work well. With that knowl- edge Canadian scientists reasoned the useful life durability of clubroot-resistant traits would last for two crops planted every four years resulting in a total of eight years of effective resist- 51Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 Todd Hyra SeCans Western Canada business manager. AAC Lacombe Pea Semi-leafless high yielding yellow pea with mildew resistance AAC Chiffon Softwheat Outyields AC Andrew Sadash with a large kernal size good straw strength shattering resistance Guttino Hybrid Rye Exceptional yields very high falling numbers strong straw AAC Gateway WW High yielding with FHB resistance Cardale HRSW Semi-dwarf good lodging FHB resistant with good yield Muskwa Barley 6-row smooth awn semi-dwarf one of the top yielders in 2012 AB variety trials Sunray Triticale Short strong straw high yielding with improved Ergot resistance SEEDNET IS SEEKING GROWERDEALERS FOR OUR VARIETIES EMAIL INFOSEEDNET.CA WWW.SEEDNET.CA FARMERS HELPING FARMERS ance. During those eight years scientists hoped to breed new types of resistance to introduce into the rotation. However with short-duration canola rotations the single gene resistance bred into clubroot-resistant traits was overcome after four or five years says Hartman. If we had a whole menu of differ- ent resistances available it wouldnt be such a big concern he says. Not only that producers faith that science will come to a timely rescue may be misguided. The first clubroot-resistant trait was brought to market earlier than the predicted eight years because genetics from winter canola shortened the road to registration. But it wont be as easy the second time around says Hartman. Scientists must find new resistance genes in related species such as the turnip which is a harder longer process. In addition scientists believe up to 10 different pathotypes exist on the Prairies. That is a real big concern that we have no way of handling these new pathotypes How do you breed for that and keep resistance for the old pathotype because that is still the prevalent one says Hartman. In the next five years it isnt going to make or break us. But in the next 10 years its going to become a significant challenge. Thats just one disease. In the field root rots blackleg and new diseases such as verticillium wilt can complicate matters. However blackleg resistance in Western Canada differs from clubroot resistance in that two forms currently exist a specific 52 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Trait Stewardship Responsibilities Notice to Farmers Monsanto Company is a member of Excellence Through Stewardship ETS. Monsanto products are commercialized in accordance with ETS Product Launch Stewardship Guidance and in compliance with Monsantos Policy for Commercialization of Biotechnology-Derived Plant Products in Commodity Crops. Commercialized products have been approved for import into key export markets with functioning regulatory systems. Any crop or material produced from this product can only be exported to or used processed or sold in countries where all necessary regulatory approvals have been granted. It is a violation of national and international law to move material containing biotech traits across boundaries into nations where import is not permitted. Growers should talk to their grain handler or product purchaser to confirm their buying position for this product. Excellence Through Stewardship is a registered trademark of Excellence Through Stewardship. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW PESTICIDE LABEL DIRECTIONS. Roundup Ready crops contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate the active ingredient in Roundup brand agricultural herbicides. Roundup brand agricultural herbicides will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Acceleron seed treatment technology for canola contains the active ingredients difenoconazole metalaxyl M and S isomers fludioxonil and thiamethoxam. Acceleron seed treatment technology for canola plus Vibrance is a combination of two separate individually-registered products which together contain the active ingredients difenoconazole metalaxyl M and S isomers fludioxonil thiamethoxam and sedaxane. Acceleron seed treatment technology for corn fungicides and insecticide is a combination of four separate individually-registered products which together contain the active ingredients metalaxyl trifloxystrobin ipconazole and clothianidin. Acceleron seed treatment technology for corn fungicides only is a combination of three separate individually-registered products which together contain the active ingredients metalaxyl trifloxystrobin and ipconazole. Acceleron seed treatment technology for corn with Poncho VoTivo fungicides insecticide and nematicide is a combination of five separate individually-registered products which together contain the active ingredients metalaxyl trifloxystrobin ipconazole clothianidin and Bacillus firmus strain I-1582. Acceleron seed treatment technology for soybeans fungicides and insecticide is a combination of four separate individually registered products which together contain the active ingredients fluxapyroxad pyraclostrobin metalaxyl and imidacloprid. Acceleron seed treatment technology for soybeans fungicides only is a combination of three separate individually registered products which together contain the active ingredients fluxapyroxad pyraclostrobin and metalaxyl. Acceleron and Design Acceleron DEKALB and Design DEKALB Genuity and Design Genuity JumpStart RIB Complete and Design RIB Complete Roundup Ready 2 Technology and Design Roundup Ready 2 Yield Roundup Ready Roundup Transorb Roundup WeatherMAX Roundup SmartStax and Design SmartStax Transorb VT Double PRO and VT Triple PRO are registered trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC Used under license. Vibrance and Fortenza are registered trademarks of a Syngenta group company. LibertyLink and the Water Droplet Design are trademarks of Bayer. Used under license. Herculex is a registered trademark of Dow AgroSciences LLC. Used under license. Poncho and Votivo are trademarks of Bayer. Used under license. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. single gene resistance and whats known as mini gene resistance which slows down the disease in a crop. These two forms of resistance have stopped blackleg from becoming a major prob- lem says Hartman. Nonetheless shorter rotations may result in a greater presence of blackleg on the seed which can affect trade as it did in 2009 when China blocked Canadian canola seed shipments. The feasibility of rotating blackleg resistances to prevent durability erosion in Canada is only just being assessed. Even if rotating different resistances was possible it only addresses the blackleg issue and not other concerns in the field such as root rot and clubroot. Disease-resistant traits may help says Hartman but its not nearly as effective as rotating the whole crop. The efficacy of crop protection products is also affected by short rotations. For example some weeds can overcome her- bicides used in herbicide-tolerant canola when used with short rotations. In addition using only one herbicide system can result in weed population shifts within a field. The use of glyphosate year after year as well as repeated use during the growing season pre-seed burn-off in-crop and pre-harvest can select for glyphosate-resistant weeds. In addition the suspected overuse of seed treatment insecti- cides due to short rotations has resulted in a shift in flea beetle populations from crucifer to striped in some regions forcing producers to spray for striped flea beetles post emergence. Any time you have something in short rotation a new pest comes in and its just like a buffet. If youve got a short rotation its going to become well established and spread very quickly says Hartman. With the canola-wheat rotation were just favouring wheat and canola pest problems. The issues are going to be similar for wheat in short rotations says Hartman. Short term while canola remains a top revenue crop for producers short-duration canola rotations will remain popular. However increased disease and pest pressure and stress on crop protection products and disease- and pest-resistant traits due to short rotations may take a big bite out of profits in the long term with millions of dollars at risk. In Alberta alone the last number of years weve had roughly a 2-billion per year crop if we lose even 10 per cent of that in 10 years time because we cant grow as much yield or on as many acres thats a couple hundred million dollars right there. It adds up quickly on a large-acre crop says Hartman. Long-term Solutions When trying to find the middle ground between short-term profitability and the long-term economic stability of the industry Hartman has a few suggestions Recent research shows a one in three rotation may offer a sus- tainable solution for industry stakeholders. This rotation could be sustainable if constant detailed scouting is carried out there are sources to alternative blackleg resistance and different clubroot resistance and herbicide systems are being rotated. When using short rotations scout fields diligently and often checking for signs of any new diseases and if possible rotate to a different variety with a different known resistance. If a producer cant rotate canola to other crops rotate crop protection systems on that field every two to three years. If a disease or pest issue is not being controlled by the products in a producers management plan extend the rotation. Because a sustainable one-in-two canola rotation is unrealistic and the one-in-four rotation is not economically feasible Hart- man says hes optimistic about the one-in-three rotation. Sup- port from both public and private institutions for blackleg and clubroot resistance breeding is ongoing and may provide future tools for growers. Higher Midge Populations Canola isnt the only billion-dollar industry that could be affected long-term by short rotations. In the next five years it isnt going to make or break us. But in the next 10 years its going to become a significant challenge. Murray Hartman Always read and follow label directions. InVigor is a registered trademark of the Bayer Group. Bayer CropScience is a member of CropLife Canada. BayerCropScience.caInVigor or 1 888-283-6847 or contact your Bayer CropScience representative. 0-66-0915-10406655-E 54 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta 855.662.6609 aggrowth.comstorm The STORM is the latest innovation in seed treatment equipment delivering precision application with in-the-yard control. Dont miss out on the opportunity to get yours today. Until December 15th 2015 receive a 3500 off all new STORM units. Some conditions apply visit stormtreaters.com for more details. Enter to win the use of a STORM for the 2016 treating season For more details and to enter visit aggrowth.comSTORMuse As part of the Midge Tolerant Steward- ship Team Todd Hyra SeCans Western Canada business manager has witnessed first-hand the effect short rotations have on wheat midge populations. Protecting the durability of midge-resistant traits in wheat is top priority for the stewardship team. When you push rotations youre going to provide the opportunity for higher midge populations says Hyra putting additional pressure on the refuge in midge- tolerant wheat varieties. If there are more midge there is going to be more feeding damage on the refuge or the susceptible component of the stand. The stewardship of allowing farm-saved seed one generation past certified ensures the population of susceptible plants is not too low and the refuge remains in there that second year. According to Hyra wheat midge can cost producers about 36 per acre or 15 per cent damage. As few as one midge per four or five heads can cause damage at this economic threshold where traditionally control measures such as spraying would be required. However if wheat prices are higher than 6 a bushel the yield potential is greater than 40 bushels per acre or the damage is greater than 15 per cent then losses escalate beyond 36 per acre says Hyra. On an annual basis wheat midge can cost the industry from 60 million to 70 million he says. The loss of the midge-tolerant trait would force producers to spray or lengthen crop rotations however Hyra says hes seen midge populations drop over the past five years because produc- ers are respecting the stewardship com- ponent of midge-tolerant wheat. Growers have been using midge-tol- erant wheat in high pressure areas. They havent been spraying. The beneficial insects have been increasing and keeping everything in balance he says. Whether its insects diseases soil disease or weeds rotating crops will help spread the risk of resistance development and potential build-up of pests. Every- thing growers can do to break some of those cycles by employing a proper crop rotation is going to be of real benefit to them long term says Hyra. Kari Belanger When you push rotations youre going to provide the opportunity for higher midge populations. Todd Hyra Handles the toughest diseases. And climates. AgCelence benefits refer to products that contain the active ingredient pyraclostrobin. Always read and follow label directions. AgSolutions is a registered trade-mark of BASF Corporation AgCelence and INSURE are registered trade-marks of BASF SE all used with permission by BASF Canada Inc. INSURE CEREAL should be used in a preventative disease control program. 2015 BASF Canada Inc. Wed never say farming in this country is easy. Thats why we created Insure Cereal. Its an advanced fungicide seed treatment that provides the most complete control of seed- and soil-borne diseases caused by fusarium. Insure Cereal is also the only cereal seed treatment that delivers the benefits of AgCelence more consistent and increased germination even in cold weather increased seedling vigour both above and below ground and better ability to manage environmental stress. To learn more visit agsolutions.cainsurecereal or call AgSolutions Customer Care at 1-877-371-BASF 2273. Seed Plant Profile 56 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta WHEN Terry Howe started working at the Alliance Seed Cleaning Association in 1980 it looked much different than it does today. After a tough struggle to raise the needed share capital the seed plant was opened in November of 1957. For the first two decades of its existence cleaning and treating of cereals was its main busi- ness. But things have changed. Those changes began when Howe took over as manager. In 1984 the plant went through a major upgrade with the addition of a new 30-foot scale metal siding a 2000 bushel-per-hour receiving leg and new overhead hopper bottom bins. A canola treater was set at the plant. Canola was treated outdoors with this unit for many years treating 5000-6000 bags annually. The changes kept coming. Another small upgrade added a building to house the canola treater. Bin bottoms were replaced with steel hoppers inside the plant a new indent was put in to increase capacity and an Oliver gravity table was added to put out a better product. With the added machinery a power upgrade was also completed. In 1996 another major upgrade began around the time Peggy Erion began work- ing there as a bookkeeper. This past Janu- ary Erion took over for Howe as manager upon his retirement. Our goal is to carry on with the legacy Terry has left us she says. He made us into something really special. We do so much more than just clean seed now. Weve become a pillar in the community. Weve become a recognized business here. APlaceforFarmersThe Alliance Seed Cleaning Association is more than just a cleaning plant its a pillar of the community. The Alliance Seed Cleaning Association plant as it looks today. 57Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 The village of Alliance is located in central Alberta 160 kilometres east of Red Deer. Established as a station on a Canadian National line in 1916 Alliance is located on Hwy. 602. Despite its communitys tiny size and population of only around 200 people the Alliance Seed Cleaning Association plant has 250 shareholders and a capacity of over 800000 bushels a year. It serves a radius of around 300 miles according to Erion. A far cry from the old days. Although most of the canola treating business is gone now due to the rarity of common varieties being grown the plants No. 1 seed is wheat followed by barley. As far as export and commodity upgrading goes it deals mostly in peas with some lentils and fababeans thrown into the mix as well. In 2010 a colour sorter was installed. Another big upgrade took place in 2014. The plant added 7500 bushels of clean storage for incoming and outgoing grain. It now boasts more warehousing and storage space than ever. A new seed treater was installed in the spring of 2014 and the plant can now treat 600 bushels in 15 minutes. Its all about keeping its customers happy and keeping up with the times Erion says. Farmers are always looking at timing its always about saving time. They want to pull in and out not sit here for two hours. Were here to make things as efficient as possible for them. Efficiency is Key That need for efficiency is what has driven the many changes that have taken place at the plant over the years. In the old days we needed farmers to haul up to 11 p.m. if we wanted to be able to clean around the clock Erion says. Now we have the storage where they can haul in and we have enough grain stored and we can move it into the plant and no one has to haul. It doesnt matter if its incoming grain or outgoing clean grain. Additionally the plant acts as a kind of storefront for Battle River Railway a co-op that bought the local regions shortline in 2010 so being able to move grain fast is hugely important. Alliance Seed Cleaning Association also buys and processes peas for Toepfer International formerly Western Grain Processing WA Grain and Pulse Solutions based out of Innisfail and Swiss Singapore in Vancouver. With us being involved in pea buying and Battle River Rail were in tune with what farmers are looking at and what their options are Erion says. There is a local co-op of farmers who recently built a loading facility in town and were help- ing them with coordination. Such efforts keep farmers coming through the door of Alliance Seed Clean- ing Association asking questions and offering the association a chance to help them out she says. A desire to help farmers with their day- to-day challenges has made the Alliance Seed Cleaning Association more than just a seed cleaning plant. Were a central hub in the community for agriculture and we like that. We like it when the farmers come in and have their coffee and chat about whats going on what their struggles are. It gives us a chance to see how we can better things for them by improving grade or improv- ing other things Erion says. In recent years the business has expanded to include a retail outlet for feed and veterinary supplies. Alliance Seed Cleaning Association is now a retailer for Master Feeds offering a wide range of supplies including dog and cat food. We are an hour away from another agricultural store like Peavey Mart. Having a syringe or a bag of milk replacer on hand thats a huge benefit for people in the community. When our spring rush is on farmers really appreciate when were open from 8 a.m. until midnight Erion says. Farmers have asked us if well stock grain auger hoppers and shovels. Were always looking at expanding. We dont want to just tap into farmers but acreage people and townspeople as well. We want to get as many people as we can through our doors and see them more often. Marc Zienkiewicz We do so much more than just clean seed now. Weve become a pillar in the community. Peggy Erion The plant as it appeared when it was first built. 58 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta ALFALFA Company Variety Info Use Hay or Grazing Winter Hardiness Merit Tested in Canada YN Highlights BrettYoung brettyoung.ca 1-800-665-5015 Stronghold Tap Root Hay Excellent Y High yield and quality Great choice for dairy producers Excellent disease resistance Proven Seed CPS Canada provenseed.ca Spredor 5 Creeping Rooted Medium to Upright Hay and grazing Multiple cut Excellent N Fifth generation creeping root trait Adapted as a legume pasture rejuvenation Tested and proven yields in salt tolerant trials BARLEY Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights CANTERRA SEEDS canterra.com 1-877-439-7333 Canmore General Purpose 2-Row 1 day later than Xena 115 of AC Metcalfe R to Smut MR to scald IR to FHB Greatly improved lodging Higher percentage plump and higher test weight Shochu market opportunity CANOLA Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights Bayer CropScience bayercropscience.ca 1-888-283-6847 InVigor L241C Hybrid napus LibertyLink 1 day earlier than the aver- age of the checks 102 of the checks InVigor 5440 Pioneer 45H29 in 20122013 WCC RRC Co-op trials R to Blackleg R to Clubroot To predominant pathotypes at time of registration InVigor L241C is the newest clubroot resistant InVigor hybrid with outstanding yield potential strong standabilty and a mid maturity suited for all clubroot affected regions of Western Canada. InVigor L241C yielded 2 higher then InVigor L135C in Bayer internal trials InVigor L157H Hybrid napus LibertyLink 1 day earlier than the aver- age of the checks 97 of the checks InVigor 5440 and Pioneer 45H29 in 20132014 WCC RRC Trials R to Blackleg InVigor L157H is the newest Evolution hybrid in the InVigor Health hybrid offering. It matures a day earlier than InVigor L156H and offers growers higher yield poten- tial plus the security of a contract premium BrettYoung brettyoung.ca 1-800-665-5015 6076 CR 2.4 days of 5440 and 45H29 99 of 5440 and 45H29 R to Clubroot Patho- type 23568 Intermediate Res to Clubroot Pathotype 5X R to Blackleg New high yield clubroot-resistant hybrid Large plant with excellent harvest characteristics 6080 RR 0.86 days of 5440 and 45H29 108 if 5440 and 45H29 R to Blackleg R to Fusarium Wilt Mid maturity hybrid with excelllent yield potential A more compact plant with excellent standability and harvest Adapted to all canola production zones CANTERRA SEEDS canterra.ca 1-877-439-7333 CS2000 Hybrid napus RR Mid 105 of 45H29 R to Blackleg R to Fusarium Wilt R to Clubroot High yielding hybrid with best available clubroot resist- ance Resistant to clubroot pathotypes 2 3 5 6 8 and interme- diate resistance to 5X CS2100 Hybrid napus RR Long 110 of 45H29 in Long Zone Multigenic R to Blackleg R to Fusarium Wilt High yielding hybrid with multigenic resistance to black- leg and higher observed pod shatter tolerance Resistant to blackleg pathotype groups 2 3 4 T CS2200 Hybrid napus CL Mid-Long 101 of 45H29 R to Blackleg R to Fusarium Wilt High yielding non-GMO hybrid with good standability and R to blackleg The Alberta Seed Guide New Varieties List is your heads up to what will soon be available in a field near you. Some varieties may only be available in limited supply so make sure you call your local representative for more information. The companies that were asked to supply information are responsible for any claims contained within the list. Always remember that variety performance may vary from region to region. Visit the seed.ab.ca website for company links. abbreviations PEST RESISTANCE R - Resistant I - Intermediate Resistance MR - Moderately Resistant MS - Moderately Susceptible S - Susceptible TRAITS AM - AcreMax Bt - ECB Resistant HXI - Herculex I YGCB - YieldGard Corn Borer CL - Clearfield Production System GENRR2Y-Genuity RR2 Yield GENVT2P RIB - Genuity VT Double PRO Refuge in a Bag GT - Glyphosate Tolerant LL - Liberty Link RR - Roundup Ready RR2 - Roundup Ready 2 RR2Y - Roundup Ready 2 Yield PESTS CB - Corn Borer RW - Corn Rootworm New VarietiesCANOLAALFALFA ECB - European Corn Borer FHB - Fusarium Head Blight IDC - Iron Deficiency Chlorosis PRR - Phytophthora Root Rot SCN - Soybean Cyst Nematode BARLEY 59Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 Midge tolerant wheat protects your crop against devastating pest damage but its up to you to protect the technology.The Stewardship Agreement limits the use of farm-saved seed to one generation past Certified seed. Its a simple step that keeps the interspersed refuge system at the proper level preventing build-up of resistant midge.Without the refuge we risk losing the one and only tolerant gene.There is no plan B. Protect this important tool. Plan for high yields and quality grades for years to come. Contact your retailer or visit www.midgetolerantwheat.ca. MTW13_NoPlanB_7.125x4.75 ProductMidgeTolerantWheatAdMTW13_NoPlanB_7.125x4.75 PublicationAlbertaSeedGuideSize7.125x4.75 MTW13_NoPlanB_7.125x4.75.qxd 102113 1255 PM Page 1 New Varieties Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights Cargill Canada 1-888-855-8558 VICTORY V-Class V12-3 Hybrid napus GENRR 12 day earlier than checks Co-op checks 5440 and 45H29 103 of 45H291 First year co-op trials all-zones 2014 Multi-genic blackleg resistance delivering an R rating R to Clubroot R to Fusarium Wilt NEW VICTORY V12-3 The first specialty canola hybrid to combine clubroot resistance with multi-genic blackleg resistance V12-3 has very good early season vigour and great yield potential with excellent standability. V12-3 is part of the Cargill Specialty Canola Program delivering Higher Returns for growers. Contact your Cargill representative or independent dealer for more information Dow AgroSciences healthierprofits.ca Nexera 1020 Hybrid napus RR LSZ MSZ 1.5 days earlier than 1012 RR 107 of 1012 RR R to Clubroot R to Fusarium Wilt Strong early season vigour Excellent standability - easy to harvest Next generation Nexera RR hybrid - improved profit and yield potential improved disease package Nexera 2022 Hybrid napus Clearfield LSZ MSZ 108 of 2012 CL R to Blackleg R to Fusarium Wilt Multi-genic blackleg resistance Excellent standability - easy to harvest Highest yielding CL hybrid in Dow AgroSciences comparison trials Nexera 1022 Hybrid napus RR LSZ MSZ 104 of 1012 RR R to Blackleg R to Fusarium Wilt First Nexera RR hybrid with multi-gene blackleg resistance Strong early season vigour Proven Seed CPS Canada provenseed.ca PV 533 G Hybrid napus GENRR Mid 104 of DKL 74-44 BL R to Blackleg R to Fusarium Wilt High yield Very strong blackleg resistance Excellent standability PV 200 CL Hybrid napus CL Mid 104 of VR 9560 CL R to Blackleg R to Fusarium Wilt High yield World class standabilty Leader in Clearfield segment PV 580 GC Hybrid napus GENRR Mid 97 of PV 530 G R to Clubroot R to Fusarium Wilt First true multigenic clubroot resistant variety High levels of resistance to clubroot pathotypes 2 3 5 6 and 8 and newly emerged pathotype 5X Excellent alternative disease package for clubroot manage- ment CANOLA 60 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta New Varieties Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights DuPont Pioneer pioneer.comcanada 306 385-3001 46M34 Hybrid napus RR Mid Maturity 101 of Pioneer hybrid 45H29 in straight cut Proving Ground grower managed field trials across Western Canada in 2015 R to Blackleg R to Fusarium Wilt R to Pod Shatter and Pod Drop New hybrid with built-in resistance to pod shatter and pod drop - contains the Pioneer Protector HarvestMax trait Excellent early growth great standability and high yield potential Available exclusively from Pioneer Hi-Bred sales reps 45CS40 Hybrid napus RRSCLCR Mid Maturity 101 of Pioneer hybrid 45H29 in Proving Ground grower managed field trials across Western Canada in 2015 R to Blackleg R to Fusarium Wilt R to Scleortinia R to Clubroot New hybrid with built-in resistance to clubroot and sclero- tinia - contains the Pioneer Protector Plus traits Excellent early growth great standability and high yield potential Available exclusively from Pioneer Hi-Bred sales reps DEKALB DEKALB.ca 1-800-667-4944 75-45 RR -1 relative to 74-44 BL 100 of L130 107 of 45S54 Monsantos 2014 field scale trials R to Blackleg R to Fusarium Wilt Unique combination of early maturity and high yield potential Fits very well in short season zones like Alberta Similar standability to 74-44 BL 75-65 RR 0.8 relative to 74-44 BL 99 of L252 103 of 45S54 Monsantos 2014 field scale trials R to Blackleg R to Fusarium Wilt Strong agronomic foundation and improved pod integrity that offers the option for straight cutting Dark seed coat and is slightly later maturing than 74-44 BL Strong yield potential Syngenta SyngentaFarm.ca 1-87-SYNGENTA SY4105 RR Mid- season R to Clubroot Delivers excellent early-season vigour with strong yield performance SY4166 RR Mid-to- long R to Blackleg Newest Genuity Roundup Ready canola hybrid from Syngenta Good early season vigor and high-end yield potential Multi-geneic blackleg resistance CORN Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights BrettYoung brettyoung.ca 1-800-665-5015 E46J77 R GT Hybrid Grain and Silage 2150 Excellent GT Tolerant Smut Tolerance to Gosss Wlit An early maturing hybrid with the Agrisure GT trait for the early corn production areas A dented kernel with a very strong stalk Dow AgroSciences dowseeds.ca DS80A27 Grain Corn 2300 CHU Excellent SmartStax New genetics with excellent top end grain yield strong emer- gence and early season vigour for cool conditions 4085 Grain Corn 2275 CHU Herculex Xtra RR2 Strong early season vigour and emergence for cold wet soils early flowering with hard textured grain for northern adaptation TMF86H77RA Silage Corn 2550 CHU SmartStax Refuge Advanced Consistent yield good digestibility high tonnage with excel- lent starch scores semi-flex ear provides flexibility across variable plant densities widely adapted for variable soil types TMF91Q25 Silage Corn 2750 CHU SmartStax Very tall robust plant with new leafy genetics nice ears with adequate husk coverage and excellent disease scores PRIDE Seeds prideseeds.com 1-800-265-5280 A4199G2 RIB GM Hybrid FoodFeed 2175 CHU Excellent grain yield GENVT2P RIB R to ECB Genuity VT Double PRO RIB hybrid delivering above ground insect control. Very early season grain corn hybrid. Strong agronomics with very rapid emergence and strong spring vigour. Features early flowering. Refuge in the bag that provide enhanced trait protection with the benefit of automatic refuge compliance CORNCANOLA Drive-over HopperConventional Auger Conventional Auger - Feterl Original Backsaver Auger - Feterl Original 1214 Backsaver Auger - Feterl Original 12 Backsaver Auger 101316 Utility Auger Unloading Auger Rollermill Hammermill Grain Vac - PTO Model Grain Vac - Diesel Model Grain Cleaner Crucial details connecting your combine to the market Visit www.farm-king.com to find a dealer near you. 2015 Buhler Trading Inc. infobuhler.com www.farm-king.com Higher input costs and tighter margins require a complete grain management system to make your operation as profitable as possible. The complete line of Farm King grain handling equipment ensures you get top dollar for your crop. With decades of grain handling experience Farm King offers everything you need to get your grain to market after it leaves the combine. www.farm-king.com Grain Cart - 10601360 PROFIT FLOWS. From high-yielding seed genetics to heart-healthy Omega-9 oil only Nexera canola reflects a growing value chain that produces the highest returns per acre year after year. GROW WITH NEXERA. EXPERIENCE THE PROFIT. healthierprofits.ca TM Trademark ofThe Dow Chemical Company Dow or an affiliated company of Dow. 1115-45385 64 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta New Varieties Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights PRIDE Seeds prideseeds.com 1-800-265-5280 A5433G3 RIB GM Hybrid Feed 2325-2475 CHU Excellent tonnage digestibility and energy GENVT3P RIB R to ECB High yielding silage choice Genuity VT Triple PRO RIB Complete PRIDE G3 hybrid delivering above and below ground insect control. Provides high biomass and outstand- ing starch levels. Excellent drought and stress tolerance. Early flowering for maturity rating. Outstanding emergence early seedling vigour standability and health. Refuge in the bag that provide enhanced trait protection with the benefit of automatic refuge compliance DuPont Pioneer pioneer.comcanada 306 385-3001 P7005AM GM Hybrid FoodFeed 2000 5.3 buac increase over Pioneer hybrid P7213R across 27 Proving Ground large scale field trials in Western Canada 2014-2015 AM HX1 LL RR2 YGCB Earliest corn hybrid that yields manages harvest timing and provides built-in protection against corn borer Optimum AcreMax corn hybrid for ultimate simplicity - no separate refuge required Adaptable for areas with lower heat unit potential Excellent yield potential good test weight scores and husk cover P7202AM GM Hybrid FoodFeed 2050 5.9 buac increase over all competitor corn hybrids in 26 Proving Ground large scale field trials in Western Canada 2014- 2015 AM HX1 LL RR2 YGCB Ultra ealry corn hybrid with corn borer protection built for Western Canada Optimum AcreMax corn hybrid for ultimate simplicity - no separate refuge required Produces large kernels and better test weights Adaptable for areas with lower heat unit potential P7211HR GM Hybrid FoodFeed 2050 2.1 buac increase over all competitor corn hybrids in 34 Proving Ground large scale field trials in Western Canada 2014- 2015 HX1 LL RR2 High yielding corn with corn borer protection Produces large kernels and better test weights P7632AM GM Hybrid FoodFeed 2225 5.5 buac increase over competi- tor corn hybrids with 61 wins across 62 Proving Ground large scale field trials in Western Canada 2014-2015 AM HX1 LL RR2 YGCB Adaptable for areas with lower heat unit potential Ultimate simplicity for the grower no separate refuge required technology in the bag Good stalk strength and excellent root strength for ease of harvest 39V09AM GM Hybrid FoodFeed 2275 3.2 buac increase over Pioneer hybrid 39D97 com- petitor corn hybrids across 7 Proving Ground large scale field trials in Western Canada 2014-2015 AM HX1 LL RR2 YGCB Optimum AcreMax corn hybrid with high yield and strong Gosss wilt resistance Ultimate simplicity for the grower no separate refuge required technology in the bag Very good drought tolerance Good root strength for improved standability and ease of harvest P8387AM GM Hybrid FoodFeed 2500 3.4 buac increase over all competitor corn hybrids 67 Wins across 3 Proving Ground large scale field trials in Western Canada 2014- 2015. AM HX1 LL RR2 YGCB High yielding corn with strong Gosss Wilt resistance for high heat unit potential areas Ultimate simplicity for the grower no separate refuge required technology in the bag Choice of harvest management - silage or grain corn hybrid P8542AM GM Hybrid FoodFeed 2600 AM HX1 LL RR2 YGCB High yielding silage corn hybrid for Western Canada Ultimate simplicity for the grower no separate refuge required technology in the bag Very good root strength and average stalk strength for improved standability and ease of harvest DEKALB DEKALB.ca 1-800-667-4944 DKC 23-17 RIB 2075 CHU GENVT2P RIB Early flowering early maturing Excellent harvest appearance and agronomics fast drydown Brings improved yield potential to its maturity zone CORN Cash Flow Solutions For Your Farm The cash advance program administered by CCGA is made available to Canadian farmers through Agriculture and Agri-Food Canadas Advance Payments Program. Boost your marketing plan and lower your financing costs with a cash advance. INTEREST FREE 400000 INTEREST FREE 100000GRAIN LIVESTOCK COMMODITIES ONE APPLICATION ONE LOw fEE MAXIMUM ADVANCE 45 Whether youre just getting started or have been farming for years a cash advance offers solutions for your farm including financial flexibility so you can market your crop or livestock when the timing and price is best for you a low blended interest rate so you can lower your cost of production and cash flow solutions for the everyday challenges of managing a farm. Applying is easier than ever too with all your advance needs in one place at CCGA. Fall advances for livestock and stored grains are available now. Find out more at 1-866-745-2256 or www.ccga.ca. 65Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 New Varieties Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights DEKALB DEKALB.ca 1-800-667-4944 DKC23-21 2075 CHU RR2 Excellent early cold emergence and vigour Above average plant health and disease tolerance Very good test weight DKC 32-12 RIB 2450 CHU GENVT2P RIB Top end yield potential Improved agronomics over existing offerings in the same RM and a shorter stature Good ear flex and performance under drought stress Good test weight and grain quality Maizex Seeds Inc. MZ 1610R SilageGrain 2100CHU 71RM Silage Very Good RR2 Early flowering hybrid results in rapid grain setup Industry leading early maturity Outstanding seedling vigour MZ 1625R SilageGrain 2200CHU 74RM Silage Excellent RR2 Roundup Tolerant Leading agronomics Tall robust plant type Impressive yield potential LF 730CBR Silage 2300CHU 74RM Silage Exceptional Genuity VT Triple Pro Consistant industry leading yield potential Unmatched early vigour combined with early flowering Rapid grain setup for impressive starch values LF 804CBR Silage 2450CHU 80RM Silage Very Good Genuity VT Triple Pro Early grain setup Tall robust plant type Aggressive spring vigour FLAX Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights CANTERRA SEEDS canterra.com 1-877-439-7333 CDC Neela 1 day to Bethune 105 of Bethune Excellent yield potential compared to Bethune Significantly higher iodine value than Flanders and Bethune CORNFLAX 66 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta New Varieties FALL RYE Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights FP Genetics fpgenetics.ca 1-877-791-1045 Bono Hybrid 1.3 days later than Prima 163 of Prima 20 cm shorter than Prima High falling number Excellent winter survival SOYBEANS Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights BrettYoung brettyoung.ca 1-800-665-5015 Notus R2 2300 CHU 00.1 Rel Mat Excellent Tolerant to IDC Rps1c gene for PRR Good tolerance to White Mould A new early maturity soybean Excellent yield and maturity combination Excellent disease and stress tolerance NorthStar Genetics northstargenetics.com 204 262-2425 NSC WATSON RR2Y 2225 CHU Excellent Excellent IDC toler- ance VG White Mould resistance Exceptionally early Relative maturity 0007 Exceptional early season vigour and very good bottom pod height Relatively tall stature forms abundant cluster pods. Many pods having 4-5 seeds NSC GLAD- STONE RR2Y 2375 CHU Excellent Excellent IDC toler- ance VG White Mould resistance Introduced last year was limited due to seed availability will be available wide-scale this year Relative maturity of 004. Extremely aggressive growth habit forming a very branchy plant well suited for wider row spacing 20 inches greater commonly found on modern planters If solid seeded with an air seeder 12 row spacing or less a lower seed rate is recommended 180000-190000 seeds per acre to allow it to fill out properly. In demonstration plots has shown to be a top yielder under a wide range of environmental conditions DuPont Pioneer pioneer.comcanada 306 385-3001 P006T78R GM Hybrid FoodFeed 2425 Pioneer variety P006T78R was 2.0 buac higher with 69 Wins over Pioneer variety 900Y61 across 52 Proving Ground large scale field trials in Western Canada 2014- 2015 Glyphosate Tolerant 1C phytophthora resistance New early soybean with excellent yield potential and very good harvest standability Excellent early emergence for better ground cover Very good white mold tolerance for disease protection against a yield robbing disease DEKALB DEKALB.ca 1-800-667-4944 24-12 RY 2425 CHU GENRR2Y Strong iron chlorosis tolerance Good field tolerance to phytophthora root rot Well-suited to all row widths and soil types 25-11 RY 2500 CHU GENRR2Y Above-average white mould and iron chlorosis tolerance Best-suited for heavier soils Fits well in no-till systems Syngenta SyngentaFarm.ca 1-87-SYNGENTA S0009-M2 2275 CHU Yield results forth- coming Rps6 gene for Phytophthora root rot field tolerance Very good white mould tolerance Very good IDC tolerance The first triple zero 000 maturity group soybean variety from Syngenta Very good disease package S007-Y4 2350 CHU SK 35.4 BuAc AB 63.5 BuAc 2014 Western adaptation trial Very good IDC tolerance Strong Phytoph- thora root rot field tolerance with Rps1c gene Very good Sclero- tinia white mould resistance Excellent disease package High yields strong emergence Broad adaptability SOYBEANSRYE FALL RYE Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights FP Genetics fpgenetics.ca 1-877-791-1045 Bono Hybrid 1.3 days later than Prima 163 of Prima 20 cm shorter than Prima High falling number Excellent winter survival SOYBEANS Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights BrettYoung brettyoung.ca 1-800-665-5015 Notus R2 2300 CHU 00.1 Rel Mat Excellent Tolerant to IDC Rps1c gene for PRR Good tolerance to White Mould A new early maturity soybean Excellent yield and maturity combination Excellent disease and stress tolerance NorthStar Genetics northstargenetics.com 204 262-2425 NSC WATSON RR2Y 2225 CHU Excellent Excellent IDC toler- ance VG White Mould resistance Exceptionally early Relative maturity 0007 Exceptional early season vigour and very good bottom pod height Relatively tall stature forms abundant cluster pods. Many pods having 4-5 seeds NSC GLAD- STONE RR2Y 2375 CHU Excellent Excellent IDC toler- ance VG White Mould resistance Introduced last year was limited due to seed availability will be available wide-scale this year Relative maturity of 004. Extremely aggressive growth habit forming a very branchy plant well suited for wider row spacing 20 inches greater commonly found on modern planters If solid seeded with an air seeder 12 row spacing or less a lower seed rate is recommended 180000-190000 seeds per acre to allow it to fill out properly. In demonstration plots has shown to be a top yielder under a wide range of environmental conditions DuPont Pioneer pioneer.comcanada 306 385-3001 P006T78R GM Hybrid FoodFeed 2425 Pioneer variety P006T78R was 2.0 buac higher with 69 Wins over Pioneer variety 900Y61 across 52 Proving Ground large scale field trials in Western Canada 2014- 2015 Glyphosate Tolerant 1C phytophthora resistance New early soybean with excellent yield potential and very good harvest standability Excellent early emergence for better ground cover Very good white mold tolerance for disease protection against a yield robbing disease DEKALB DEKALB.ca 1-800-667-4944 24-12 RY 2425 CHU GENRR2Y Strong iron chlorosis tolerance Good field tolerance to phytophthora root rot Well-suited to all row widths and soil types 25-11 RY 2500 CHU GENRR2Y Above-average white mould and iron chlorosis tolerance Best-suited for heavier soils Fits well in no-till systems Syngenta SyngentaFarm.ca 1-87-SYNGENTA S0009-M2 2275 CHU Yield results forth- coming Rps6 gene for Phytophthora root rot field tolerance Very good white mould tolerance Very good IDC tolerance The first triple zero 000 maturity group soybean variety from Syngenta Very good disease package S007-Y4 2350 CHU SK 35.4 BuAc AB 63.5 BuAc 2014 Western adaptation trial Very good IDC tolerance Strong Phytoph- thora root rot field tolerance with Rps1c gene Very good Sclero- tinia white mould resistance Excellent disease package High yields strong emergence Broad adaptability 67Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 New Varieties WHEAT Company Variety Info Maturity Yield DiseasePest Resistance Highlights Mastin Seeds mastinseeds.com 403 556-2609 Go Early CWRS -2 days CDC Go 105 CDC Go I to Stripe Rust R-I to Stem aand Leaf Rust R to Common Bunt Large kernels Proven Seed CPS Canada provenseed.ca 5605HR CL CWRS Equal to AC Barrie 106 of AC Barrie IMR to FHB R to Leaf Rusts Heavy bushel weights Clearfield weed management system Good fit where complex field conditions exist CDC Titanium CWRS 1 day earlier than AC Barrie 103 of AC Barrie Midge Tolerant MR to FHB R to Stripe Rust Highest FHB rating of all midge tolerant varieties Improved standability compared to others in class Excellent and flexible choice without sacrificing yield CANTERRA SEEDS canterra.com 1-877-439-7333 Thorsby - 4 days Carberry - 1 day Harvest 106 AC Barrie R to stripe rust leaf rust MR to stem rust I to FHB Excellent yield potential with earlier maturity Higher test weight and thousand kernal weight WHEAT THIS year the Prairie Grain Development Committee met Feb. 23-25 in Banff Alta. to review new cultivars and put forth those that will deliver benefits to farmers or end-users. PGDC is comprised of four independent recommending com- mittees responsible for the testing evaluation and recommenda- tion of grain crop candidate cultivars for registration in Western Canada. These include the Wheat Rye Triticale Committee the Oat Barley Committee Pulse Special Crops Committee and the Oilseeds Committee. The annual PGDC meeting serves as a forum for the exchange of information relevant to the development of improved grain cultivars for the western Canadian prairies. The Prairie Recommending Committee for Wheat Rye Triticale PRCWRT consists of three evaluation teams focused on agronomy disease and end-use quality. There were a record number of lines supported at the meeting this year says Curtis Pozniak PRCWRT chair. In total 35 cultivars were considered of which 17 full and interim were automatically supported. The remaining cultivars were considered by the Cultivar Voting Panel. Two of the 35 culti- var lines put forth were not supported for cultivar registration. The increased number of cultivars supported this year will provide farmers with a greater choice of cultivars that are best suited to their production systems and unique environmental conditions Pozniak says. Fourteen cultivars were put forth and supported for full registra- tion by all three evaluation teams agronomy disease and end-use quality. These include but are not limited to Canadian Western Red Spring varieties BW965 and BW966 both put forth by Agri- culture and Agri-Food Canadas Semiarid Agricultural Research Centre SPARC in Swift Current Sask. Also part of this mix is T235 a spring triticale from Seed-link in Lindsay Ont. and RT209 and RT210 both fall ryes from KWS Lochow GMBH in Einbeck Germany. Canada Western Amber Durums included DT577 DT578 and DT579 put forth by the Crop Development Centre CDC at the University of Saskatchewan and DT856 put forth by AAFC SPARC. Pozniak adds that this was the second year the committee implemented its revised operating procedures by which a cultivar voting panel comprised of 23 members considered candidate cultivars not automatically endorsed by the three evaluation teams. An additional 11 varieties were supported for registration after the variety was presented and voted upon by the PRCWRT cultivar voting panel. The voting panel consists of seven members from each evalua- tion team plus one representative each from the Canadian Seed Growers Association and the Canadian Seed Trade Association The Prairie Grain Development Committee supported the registration of more than 30 wheat rye and triticale varieties adding more choice in the marketplace for farmers. DeliveringMore Choice totheMarketplace PGDC Update 68 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta On 60000 farms and 20 million acres across Canada the name SeCan is trusted for exceptional seed value. Canadian farmers plant SeCan genetics on more acres than any other seed brand. SeCan is not a seed company. As Canadas Seed Partner were a not-for-profit member association that has returned more than 90 million dollars to Canadian plant breeders. Genes that fit your farm is a registered trademark of SeCan. This is your land. And these are your genetics. Call your SeCan seed retailer for genes that fit your farm. www.secan.com Your land. Your genetics. Your land. Your genetics. which helps to ensure balanced representation of entire value chain when looking at new cultivars. Pozniak says that the committee also considered a number of cultivars for interim registration most notably for the cultivars of Faller and Prosper. This required the PRCWRT to set aside our operating guidelines to allow subjective assessment of these cultivars which provide niche value he says. This supports the flexibility of our current operating procedures. Interim Registration Faller a variety put forth by North Dakota State University Research Foundation and Seed Depot Corp. the exclusive licensee and distributor in Canada received a three-year interim registration. Faller was previously part of a closed loop intellectual property program in Manitoba. This interim regis- tration will enable them to expand market development. The foundation also introduced its sister variety Prosper. The cultivar voting panel also supported interim registration for W530 an experimental hard white winter wheat designed for use in the Asian market for steamed buns. Bred by R.J. Graf of AAFC at the Lethbridge Research Centre this particular variety has exhibited great load quality functionality and produces a very white flour. Belvoir and Sparrow both wheat varieties that fall into the Canada Western General Purpose class also received interim registration and can be used in the ethanol livestock and general purpose markets. These two varieties demonstrated higher yields and are later maturing. FP Genetics Elgin ND a Canadian Prairie Spring Red wheat also received interim registration. Oilseeds The Prairie Recommending Committee for Oilseeds reviewed eight flax varieties and all eight were recommended for registra- tion five brown varieties and three yellow varieties. One yellow variety Omega was put forward for interim registration. Two brown mustards and one oriental mustard were recommended for registration. Reports suggest the biggest challenge for the PRCO will be the number of co-op trials conducted moving forward. AAFC and Crop Production Services are pulling their breeding programs during the next two years which leaves only the Crop Development Centre. The idea is to reduce the number of co-op trials from three to one meaning the brown yellow and Northern trials will likely be combined into one. Multiple sites would still exist but the number of independent co-op trials and check varieties would be reduced. Lorena Pahl and Julie Deering WHEREON THE WEB For a full listing of all varieties recommended at the PGDC meetings earlier this year visit the new seed.ab.ca. TheRH400AutomatedSprayerBoomHeightControl NEW ISOBUS compatible option FEATURES NEW Choose from Three Operating Modes - Bare Ground - Partial Canopy - Full Canopy For optimum performance and stable operation NEW Smart self-calibration.Automatically adjusts to the sprayers hydraulic performance NEW Ability to control proportional PWM valves NEW Long Range Sensors - Competitive prices - Choose from 2-5 sensor systems Fits ALL sprayers with electric-over-hydraulic controls Few components works with existing valves - DIY install Modified versions available for header height control and other applications Formoreinformationcall 519-669-4698oremailinfogreentronics.com SimpleAffordableFarmerFriendly. StanPeutertAssiniboiaSKTopAirsprayer120ft WWW.GREENTRONICS.COM ORDER EARLY AND SAVE UP TO 675.00 70 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta A high yielding strong strawed CWRS with broad disease resistance. Consistent performance in all environments. Hits the mark on all agronomic factors. Warburtons Approved Variety. A high grading high protein variety with leading root rot resistance. A step forward in yield. Higher HVK protein and test weight. allianceseed.com 1-877-270-2890 Seed Grower Profile 72 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta HEATHER KERSCHBAUMER is the president of Forage Seed Canada FSC a national voice representing all grass seed and legume seed producers in the country. She also grows conventional and organic pedigreed seed with her husband John. Together they own Golden Acre Seeds in Fair- view Alta. growing seed for bromegrass creeping red fescue crested wheatgrass orchardgrass and alfalfa. Add it up and its a tall order for someone who didnt plan on being in agriculture in the first place. I didnt go to school for agriculture. My husband is a third-gen- eration farmer and when I married him I just sort of found myself in the middle of it she says. Golden Acre Seeds is about 8500 acres in size split evenly between organic and conventional seed production. They also clean forage seed a business theyve built over the years. Theyre currently doubling the size of the plant due to high demand. It will be like a brand new plant again and should be back in operation by the end of the year she says. Every time you build them you get a little wiser and make it a little better. Now 54 she sees a bright future ahead for forage seed in Canada but that future wont come without a fight. Its a major reason she assumed the role as president for Forage Seed Canada. The more involved you get and the more knowledge you gain the more committed you become she says. Getting Respect According to Kerschbaumer the Canadian forage seed industry is beginning to command the respect it deserves. But it wasnt always that way. Back before we even had AgriStability there were times where disaster payments were paid out to spice people the ginseng guys for crop acres but nothing for forage seed. We wondered why everyone else got these payments but someone who had creeping red fescue or bromegrass acres never got anything. Anyone with alfalfa seed never got anything she says. The reason was we were lumped in as forage and not considered to be on the seed side of things. We approached the province and federal government and they said Get yourself a national voice and come to the table. In 2007 FSC was born. It is currently made up of five provincial seed associations including the Alberta Alfalfa Seed Commission Saskatchewan Forage Seed Development Commission Saskatch- ewan Leafcutter Association Manitoba Forage Seed Association and Peace Region Forage Seed Association. FSC represents Canadian forage seed producers concerns regarding all national forage seed issues. One of the initial projects undertaken by FSC was to put forage seed growers on the radar of the federal government. One big issue was the above-mentioned Grains Oilseeds Payment Program GOPP payments that forage seed producers in Canada missed out on for years. Most recently one issue has come to the top of FSCs agenda genetically modified alfalfa. Although Roundup Ready alfalfa has been approved for sale in Canada Forage Genetics Inter- national the company that markets the product is holding off on a Canadian commercial release. Although some small- scale trials are underway in Eastern Canada FSC wants to keep Fighting forForage Seed Heather Kerschbaumer didnt plan on being a seed grower never mind representing the Canadian forage seed industry. Now shes doing both. Heather Kerschbaumer and her husband John operate Golden Acre Seeds in Fairview Alta. Shes also president of Forage Seed Canada. 73Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 Western Canada free of GM alfalfa so as not to lose export markets that dont want any GM materials present in hay or seed shipments. People often say I dont see the problem with this. Its coming its scientifically proven to be safe theres all kinds of documen- tation that says its not any substantially different than regular alfalfa so why arent we at the forefront of this and being accept- ing of it Kerschbaumer says. Why would we want to be first when the rest of the world says they dont want it The rest of the world is going the other way. We need to protect the integrity of our alfalfa until such a time that the rest of the world accepts it. In our opinion coexistence is impossible. For Kerschbaumer the effort to keep Western Canada free of GM alfalfa is just another way of defending the industry she has grown to love. If we get everyone on-side anything is possible she says. The more involved you get and the more knowledge you gain the more committed you become. A Face for Forage Seed Kerschbaumer is helping put a face on a forage seed industry that is often not given as much attention as other sectors. Forage seed producers face unique challenges she says and having a national voice helps put those challenges in the spotlight. The reason we have so many provincial forage seed associa- tions is so we can fund research on our own crops. In general the big companies dont bother with these little crops. While they spend money testing new chemicals on wheat and canola we have to pay for our own research on whether it will work on forage crops she says. The various forage seed associations pay for their own research and apply for matching funds to try and expand the amount of research they can do. They have to do their own testing and apply for minor use registrations and hire someone specific to do that job. Despite the challenges that come with being in the forage seed industry Kerschbaumer says she enjoys meeting new people and being involved in an industry as varied as forage seed. She encourages farmers to use only high-quality pedigreed seed that meets if not exceeds the standards set for certified seed especially when it comes to alfalfa and fears of contamination. In most cases we encourage people to use certified seed but when it comes to the GM alfalfa issue its got me convinced that where were going to bring contamination in is going to be from certified seed thats being brought in from growers who arent paying close attention she says. Here in the Peace region were advising people to buy your seed locally from the Peace. She adds that as the profile of the sector is raised the quality of forage seed increases as well. I think theres still a light at the end of the tunnel and thats why I keep on going. Marc Zienkiewicz Discounts and Financing Available Corn - Silage Grain Grazing RR Conventional varieties available Soybean Acres Needed Albertas most trusted and experienced soybean genetics supplier Established in Tilley and serving Southern Alberta for 29 years Call Planting the Seeds of Success UA ALFA GOLD UA BOUNTY GOLD 6KING GENETICS RR1 Viking Alberta T0B4N0 TWO NEW CERTIFIED CANOLA SEED VARIETIES FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA UA Alfa Gold and UA Bounty Gold available at 6King Genetics Open Pollinated Conventional Canolas Kevin or Edmund Lefsrud lefsrudtelusplanet.net Kevin 780-336-5700c 780-336-2500h Edmund 780-336-6700c 780-336-2588h CERTIFIED SEED Acreage Report 74 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta PEDIGREEDSEEDPRODUCTION IN2015BYTHENUMBERS Some preliminary statistics from the Canadian Seed Growers Association on what the year looked like for Albertas pedigreed seed industry. Crop Kind 2015 2014 Alfalfa 35967 27602 Barley 49333 43555 Beans 60 20 Bromegrass 3495 3315 Clover 1536 1285 Faba Beans 5363 6210 Fescue 7756 4952 Flax 8346 7493 Hemp 3295 3926 Lentils 2139 1126 Mustard 2103 2055 Oats 5630 4264 Peas 30189 25515 Rape 44960 53199 Rye 1254 2067 Ryegrass 680 NA Soybeans 588 711 Timothy 15966 16272 Triticale 2171 3317 Wheat 77526 68003 Wheatgrass 3349 3215 Minor crops 395 450 Grand Total 302100 297331 The Cereal Seed Experts FP Genetics is owned by over 150 seedsmen who know and grow our industry-leading cereal varieties. Although these varieties will evolve one thing will never changeour commitment to bringing the best cereal varieties to Western Canadian growers. FP Genetics is a trademark of FP Genetics Inc. All others are trademarks of their respective companies. 2015 FP Genetics. All rights reserved. 1457 09.15 CDC Plentiful CWRS fusarium resistance high yield early maturity CDC Utmost VB CWRS midge tolerance high yield AC Muchmore CWRS semi-dwarf great standability high yield Elgin ND NEW milling class high yield higher protein than other varieties AC Transcend CWAD great harvestability excellent colour retention AC Summit White Milling Oat high yield plump kernels CDC Minstrel White Milling Oat great yield good nutritional qualities Brasetto Hybrid Fall Rye higher yields high ROI AAC Bravo Flax large seed good yield Abarth Yellow Pea large seed high yield For more information on FP Genetics varieties or to find your local seedsmen visit fpgenetics.ca OUR INDUSTRYLEADING VARIETIES Considering Cover Crops The tillage radishes on the left of the card were planted Aug. 15 as opposed to the ones on the right which were planted on July 10. The early seeded ones emerged and had enough daylight to go into the reproductive stage and the size of the roots is a clear indicator of where the energy went. PhotocourtesyPatrickFabian One of the most effective options for many growers is a cover crop mixture according to seed grower Patrick Fabian. PhotocourtesyGregStamp 76 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta WHAT was once a fixture in some quarters before falling into disfavour appears to have found a new generation of fans in Alberta. Cover crops such as red top turnips sugar beets forage rape- seed alfalfa red clover and winter peas have been the subject of renewed interest across Alberta over the past several years. Cover crops can provide a number of benefits including reduced wind and water erosion improved soil quality and a reduction in weeds diseases and insects. While cover crops have been utilized for centuries there was a marked decline in their use with the introduction of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides. The recent increased attention in cover crops has been thanks in large part to the development of pest and weed resistance issues in some plants and an increased inter- est in integrated farming systems that include both synthetic and biological elements. Yeah there has been more interest the last five years or so I would say. Every year weve done more and more cover crops says Greg Stamp a seed grower with Enchant Alta.-based Stamp Seeds. I think people are just looking to get that extra use out of their land if they do have empty land at some point in the year. A lot of people are also looking at preventing erosion or improving the soil they are working without as much tillage as they might have used in the past. Patrick Fabian president and CEO of Tilley Alta.-based Fabian Seed Farms says another factor in the recent resurgence of cover crops is that farmers now have far greater access to information than they used to. Thanks to the Internet growers can now find out what has or hasnt worked in virtually any corner of the globe he says. Access to Information We used to have local publications and that was pretty much it Fabian says. Now we have access to what farmers are doing all over the world. A lot of these concepts and ideas are being brought up here and introduced. The challenge when it comes to cover crops in Alberta is most parts of the province have a relatively short growing season compared to more southern climates. Still results to date have been promising. Fabian says he has spoken with a number of growers across the province who have reported success with tillage radishes sugar COVERCROPS MOUNTINGACOMEBACK Cover crops are once again a cropping consideration in Alberta thanks in part to weed and pest resistance in some plants and an increased focus on integrated farming methods. 77Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 beets red top turnips and forage rapeseed. Not only do these crops help prevent erosion and renew the soil they also provide an excellent source of grazing for sheep and cattle he says. Stamp says hes received several reports from farmers in the Taber area about the success theyve experienced planting late-summer cover crops for grazing after harvesting early silage crops. He noted a number of growers have also told him how planting radishes helped water to better penetrate the soil where the radishes had been planted earlier. Careful Consideration While cover crops can provide numerous benefits there are sev- eral factors that growers should consider before choosing them. Fabian says those factors include soil conditions the type of farm you have and what your overall goals for it are. Every farm is unique and every farm is different he says. We still have a lot to learn about the cover crop industry here in Alberta. Some things work well some of them dont work well. One of the most common errors growers make with cover crops Fabian says is planting them too early which can prompt the plant to go into reproductive mode rather than winter survival mode. In the case of tillage radishes growers were initially advised to plant them around June 21. Now Fabians company advises growers to start planting radishes no sooner than Aug. 1. The problem was most of the preliminary data that was available was based on results from early trials in parts of the U.S. where the growing season and conditions were decidedly different than in Alberta. Stamp cautions that cover crops might not be right for every farm operation. Thats especially true for some smaller farms that may not have a sufficient pool of labour. Helping Hands Essential If you are short on labour and dont have enough manpower to get the job done when you need to get it done then that would be an issue he says. Another consideration when it comes to cover crops accord- ing to Stamp is herbicide residue from whatever you planted earlier in the season which can have a residual effect on many types of cover crops. Fabian says one of the most effective options for many grow- ers is a cover crop mixture. One of the most popular mixes his company sells features crimson clover hairy vetch forage rape- seed red top turnip tillage radish and sugar beets. What growers are finding is it gives a diversity for covering the soil loosening up the compacted layer of soil and yet having a forage value their animals could benefit from after he says. It is kind of a win-win-win. Intercropping An increasingly popular alternative to cover crops is intercrop- ping the seeding of two different crops in the same field. In Alberta it often involves corn being planted in the same plot as a crop such as radishes or peas. Some intercrops such as legumes and cereals can be plowed into the soil to provide nitrogen and organic matter respectively while peas and oats can provide a nutritious greenfeed mix for livestock. Fabian says growers need to be careful about what they decide to intercrop. In some cases two different plants might recognize each other as hostile competitors or weeds and end up destroy- ing each other. The upside is that intercropping when done correctly can provide a grower with more products that can be potentially sold he says. In cases where one larger plant is grown with a smaller one both can be easily cleaned out from the other. Fabian says intercropping is often an effective strategy on organic farms where growers dont have a lot of options in terms of weed control. His advice to growers is to start slow. If the client can get their feet wet with a small amount thats great he says. If it doesnt work in your area then its not the end of the world. You didnt gamble the whole farm on it. If it does work then we can tweak it a little bit for that particular client and expand it a little bit to their comfort level. Jim Timlick BasicsofIntercropping Intercroppinginvolvesgrowingmorethanonecropin thesamefieldatthesametime. Thecropsmaybeseededatthesametimemixed intercroppingortheymaybeseededatdifferenttimes relayintercropping.Stripintercroppingisaproduction systemwheredifferentcropsaregrowninwidestrips usuallythewidthofaseederinthesamefield. Why intercrop 1.StabilityIntercroppingaddsdiversitytothecropping systemanddiversitytendstoleadtostabilityaccording toresearchdoneattheUniversityofManitoba. 2.ReducedchemicaluseIntercroppingmayallowfor lowerinputlevelsinacroppingsystembyreducing fertilizerandpesticiderequirements. 3.OveryieldingThisoccurswhentheyieldproduced byanintercropislargerthantheyieldproducedbythe componentcropsgrowninmonocultureonthesame totallandarea. Recommendations Intercroppingwithcommonannualcropsisfeasibleand resultsinoveryieldingabout75percentofthetimein conventionalproduction. Thebestcropcombinationtestedinanexperiment attheUniversityofManitobawascanola-peawhich overyielded100percentofthetimeunderconventional management. Thepoorestcombinationwaswheat-peawhichhad problemswithweedsandlodging. Ingeneralincreasingthenumberofcropsgrown togetherresultedinbetterweedsuppression. Includingpeasinthecombinationincreasedgrain proteincontentresultinginpricepremiumsforwheat. Sourcehttpwww.umanitoba.caoutreach naturalagriculturearticlesintercrop.html THE REAL STORY OF AG Contrast that statistic with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canadas recent survey that found the public perceives the ag industry as unsustainable and environmentally harmful and its clear that we have a serious gap to address. Sustainability and the environment are not only top-of-mind issues for those that work in the industry they are also top-of-mind topics for the consumer says Dr. Cami Ryan Social Sciences Lead at Monsanto Canada. The problem is that approximately two per cent of the population in North America is responsible for farming and food production which leads to a broader society that is largely disengaged from and often misinformed about food production processes. Dr. Ryan believes that its more important than ever for those of us in the industry to reach out to the consumer to talk about what were doing to produce food in a responsible and sustainable way. If we dont engage and actively listen then the risk is that farmers wont have the freedom to choose the tools they want and need to grow food for you me and the rest of the world says Dr. Ryan. Yes we need to be equipped with facts and evidence but more importantly we need to reach out to others and share our passion for food and agriculture through personal anecdotes and stories. This is an extremely powerful proven approach and will go a long way to bridge the current divide. The good news is that the idea of sharing the sustainable side of agriculture is starting to catch on. Alberta producer and social media agvocate Jay Schultz WheatlanderJay isnt afraid to wade into discussions on sustainable ag and he encourages others to do the same. Agriculture is a dynamic industry and is continuously evolving. What works in one region or sector doesnt always work in another. But one thing that we have in common is that we all want to be good stewards of the land says Schultz whose wife operates the popular blog Nurse Loves Farmer. We need to communicate that passion for what we do coupled with a continued openness to learn and adapt. If we do this well ensure increased market access and overall long-term health of the environment and our businesses. According to a recent study conducted by the Canadian Federation of Independent Business 95 per cent of Canadian producers are taking action to protect the environment. Speak up about sustainable agriculture Start talking about sustainability today. For more information and tools check out our resources at AgMoreThanEver.ca. THE REAL STORY OF AG THE REAL STORY OF AG Modern agriculture is all about sustainability The late U.S. congressman Ike Skelton captured the link between agriculture and the environment best when he said Because of their connection to the land farmers do more to protect and preserve our environment than almost anyone else. They are some of the best environmentalists around. While Ikes quote has plenty of facts to back it up most Canadians would never think about ag and environmental sustainability working together. In fact many think the opposite. Its our job to change that perception and show how Canadian agriculture is actually a world leader in on-farm environmental practices. Here are some numbers to use in your discussions THE REAL STORY OF AG Canadian agriculture plays a big role in creating a more sustainable world for all of us. Lets spread the word and change peoples perception about ag. Get more facts like the ones above at AgMoreThanEver.ca. As we mark the United Nations International Year of the Soils in 2015 its a great moment to celebrate the role Canadian ag has played in decreasing soil erosion. According to Statistics Canada more than half of all farmland in Canada is now cultivated using minimum tillage practices drastically improving the quality of our soil in various areas of production. Less tillage and more direct seeding on Canadian farmland has also meant weve been burning far less fuel. Add that to the rapid adoption of new technology like GPS and unmanned aerial vehicles and were drastically reducing our fuel emissions. Not only is this helping the environment but its also making our industry more efficient. Our sustainable actions arent just restricted to crops. Grazing livestock ensures were using the available land in the most efficient and sustainable way possible. While crops cant grow everywhere our animals can feed and thrive in areas where not much else can. CreatedApril2015 Minimum tillage saves more than 170 MILLION LITRES OF FUEL from being burned in Canada annually. Source The Real Dirt of Farming 2014 CreatedApril2015 Source The Real Dirt of Farming 2014 CreatedAugust2014 they thrive where Grazing livestock dont waste land crops cantSource Ontario Farm Animal Council Get involved today Ag More Than Ever is an industry cause to create positive perceptions and dialogue about the Canadian agricultural industry. Its a big job thats built on partnerships and the collective energy of everyone in the industry. Getting involved is easier than you think and were here to help. Visit AgMoreThanEver.ca for agvocate resources and tips and join a community of like-minded people looking to tell the real positive story of Canadian ag. Knowing the facts is the best way to prepare for any ag conversation that comes your way. These resources can help The Real Dirt on Farming Both the website realdirtonfarming.ca and the publication available for download on the site offer excellent examples of producers as active environmentalists. Specically Chapter 6 in the booklet provides the facts background and real-life stories of how agriculture is a shining example of land and animal stewardship. Nourish PotashCorps website on healthy soils To help educate the public as part of the International Year of Soils PotashCorp has created a section on their website focused on healthy soils. Visit potashcorp.comnourish and discover some amazing stories of producers and businesses around the world protecting their land and their soil. With the sustainable practices being implemented today in industries like agriculture the U.N. is optimistic that the Earths soils will provide the food we need to feed another two billion people by 2050. Helpful resources on sustainability Safe food animal welfare sustainability people care deeply about these things when they make food choices. And all of us in the agriculture industry care deeply about them too. But sometimes the general public doesnt see it that way. Why Because for the most part were not telling them our story and too often someone outside the industry is. The journey from farm to table is a conversation we need to make sure were a part of. So lets talk about it together. Visit AgMoreThanEver.ca to discover how you can help improve and create realistic perceptions of Canadian ag. We all share the same table. Pull up a chair. We take pride in knowing we would feel safe consuming any of the crops we sell. If we would not use it ourselves it does not go to market. Katelyn Duncan Saskatchewan The welfare of my animals is one of my highest priorities. If I dont give my cows a high quality of life they wont grow up to be great cows. Andrew Campbell Ontario The natural environment is critical to farmers we depend on soil and water for the production of food. But we also live on our farms so its essential that we act as responsible stewards. Doug Chorney Manitoba SENDZIAK SEED FARM Thorsby AB 1024-112A St. NW Edmonton AB T6J 6S1 Phone 780-434-1322 Cell 780-940-7566 780-690-6974 Email sendseedtelusplanet.net stephensendziakgmail.com DonKrystyna Stephen Sendziak Pedigreed Varieties Wheat AC Stettler AC Conquer AAC Redwater AAC Brandon AAC Penhold Barley CDCYorkton Bentley Merit-57 CDC Austenson Canmore AAC Connect Oats Triactor CDC Seabiscuit Peas CDC Raezer CDC Tetris CDC Amarillo Flax CDC Sorrel WARBURGS E E D C L E A N I N G C O - O P L T D . PHONE 780-848-2365 HOME 780-696-2151 MANAGER Tom Luethi warscpgmail.com Box 60 Warburg Alberta T0C 2T0 FOR CLEANER SEED Seed Grain Separation Dockage Grass Seed Seed Treating Grass Seeder Rentals Tarps Pony Oats and much more CELL 780-945-6424 FAX 780-848-2366 BARLEY S F R C AAC SYNERGY BI AAFC Brandon Dist Syngenta Richardson Cargill Ellis Brian Olds AB 403 556-2890 R Harbin Clifford T. Bruce C. Rivercourse AB 780 745-2268 C AC METCALFE BI AAFC Brandon Dist SeCan Members Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 R C Cornish Bob Airdrie AB 403 948-3070 R C Davidson E. Daryl Dean Kitscoty AB 780 846-2456 R Dueck Ralph E. Brent Olds AB 403 556-2602 S F R Eliason Bruce W. Wrentham AB 403 222-2258 R C Fosters Seed Feed Limited Beaverlodge AB 780 354-2107 R Jacula Dean S. Shawn D. Vermilion AB 780 581-9011 C Kapitski Lawrence Andrew AB 780 365-2134 C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 R Kopjar Gerald M. Rowley AB 403 368-2409 C Limoges Richard McLennan AB 780 324-2335 R C Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane Luke New Norway AB 780 352-3240 C Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 C McNelly Bevin Clyde AB 780 348-5749 R C Mueller Richard R. R. Rosemary Barrhead AB 780 674-2595 R Murray Bruce Wesley Lethbridge AB 403 327-9389 C Nemetz Charlie Jerritt Lewis B. Stettler AB 403 742-0436 C Niemela Terrance Tracy Sylvan Lake AB 403 746-2645 C Ohrn Norman Thorsby AB 780 985-2263 C Penwest Seed Three Hills AB 403 443-2577 C Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 R C Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 C Strain Arthur George Foremost AB 403 867-2227 C Svanes Ronald J. Picture Butte AB 403 317-0981 C Svean Alan Carl Scott Rivercourse AB 780 745-2578 R C Webber Curtis Stony Plain AB 780 963-6897 R Wood Robert Patricia Marshall Bowden AB 403 224-3928 C AC ROSSER BI AAFC Brandon Dist SeCan Members Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 F AMISK BI FCDC Lacombe Dist SeCan Members Brummelhuis Tara Vauxhall AB 403 654-2734 R Dyck Heinz W. Colin Alan Kelton Rosemary AB 403 378-3321 S C Haney Farms Picture Butte AB 403 738-4517 C Jones Greg Thomas Ponoka AB 403 783-6495 F C Kittle James W. Andrew Viking AB 780 336-2583 C Mans John Nobleford AB 403 824-3585 R Thompson M. Ellwood K. Red Deer County AB 403 728-3535 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 S F Webber Curtis Stony Plain AB 780 963-6897 C Witdouck Dale Iron Springs AB 403 738-4395 C BENTLEY BI FCDC Lacombe Dist Canterra Seeds King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 R Parkland Fertilizers Wetaskiwin AB 780 352-3359 C Sendziak Don P. Stephen Edmonton AB 780 434-1322 C Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 R Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 R 84 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta cereals Alberta and British Columbia Pedigreed Seed Growers Directory of Varieties Produced in 2015 Grower listings were prepared by the Canadian Seed Growers Association for varieties eligible for sale in Canada and crops issued certicates at the time of publication. Breeding institution and distributor listings were prepared by the publisher. CSGA assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions in any listings. Pedigreed class code is listed after the growers phone number. SSelect FFoundation RRegistered CCertied BIBreeding Institution DistCanadian Distributors NOTE Varieties denoted with a are carryover pedigreed seed. Pulse Raising. With improved phosphate availability and increased nitrogen fixation TagTeam inoculant improves yield potential. Give your pulse crops the boost they need. TagTeam dual action performance its pulse raising. See your local retailer today or visit useTagTeam.ca. Nature. Its powerful technology. TagTeam Raise your Pulse with N and P. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS 115 independent large-plot trials in Canada between 1997 and 2012 showed an average yield increase of 8 over nitrogen only single-action inoculants. Individual results may vary and performance may vary from location to location and from year to year. This result may not be an indicator of results you may obtain as local growing soil and weather conditions may vary. Growers should evaluate data from multiple locations and years whenever possible. TagTeam and Monsanto BioAg and Design are trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC Monsanto Canada Inc licensee. 2015 Monsanto Canada Inc. 1472-1 09.15 BUSBY BI FCDC Lacombe Dist Mastin Seeds Anderson Ken Evelyn Barrhead AB 780 674-5670 C Mastin Robert B. Sundre AB 403 556-2609 C CANMORE BI FCDC Lacombe Dist Canterra Seeds Benci Dennis Carmangay AB 403 643-2294 C Cross Douglas Westlock AB 780 349-2587 R Haney Farms Picture Butte AB 403 738-4517 C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 R Sendziak Don P. Stephen Edmonton AB 780 434-1322 R Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 S C Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 R CDC AUSTENSON BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Benci Dennis Carmangay AB 403 643-2294 R C Brummelhuis Tara Vauxhall AB 403 654-2734 R Card Gordon B. Magrath AB 403 758-3444 C Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 C Crooymans John Joseph Andrew Bow Island AB 403 580-7264 C Dyck Heinz W. Colin Alan Kelton Rosemary AB 403 378-3321 R Fabian Patrick V. Tilley AB 403 377-2000 R Feenstra Lloyd Barons AB 403 757-3737 C Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 C Hadland Edward Baldonnel BC 250 789-3646 R C Hallett Dale R. Richard Carstairs AB 403 337-3072 R C Haney Farms Picture Butte AB 403 738-4517 C Hoff Peter Edward Gleichen AB 403 734-2140 C Huvenaars Carl Hays AB 403 725-2213 C Huvenaars John Lisa Hays AB 403 725-2126 C Jones Greg Thomas Ponoka AB 403 783-6495 R C Kemp Richard L. Red Deer County AB 403 227-4836 C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 R C Kopjar Gerald M. Rowley AB 403 368-2409 C Limoges Richard McLennan AB 780 324-2335 C Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 C Massey Derwin Stettler AB 403 883-2503 C McNelly Bevin Clyde AB 780 348-5749 C Mueller Richard J. R. R. Rosemary Barrhead AB 780 674-2595 R Nemetz Charlie Jerritt Lewis B. Stettler AB 403 742-0436 C Niemela Terrance Tracy Sylvan Lake AB 403 746-2645 C Oatway Lori Clive AB 403 784-3001 R Pare Raymond A. Wainwright AB 780 842-2073 S R Penwest Seed Three Hills AB 403 443-2577 R C Selte Donald Vermilion AB 780 853-2484 C Sendziak Don P. Stephen Edmonton AB 780 434-1322 C Shultz Shawn Didsbury AB 403 335-3694 R Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 C Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 C Templeton Doran Brant Lethbridge AB 403 345-4144 C Trueblood Brian G. Dapp AB 780 954-3745 C Victoor Rene Jamie Sturgeon County AB 780 459-3253 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 F C Webber Curtis Stony Plain AB 780 963-6897 C Weigum Garry Sarah Three Hills AB 403 443-2476 C Witdouck Dale Iron Springs AB 403 738-4395 C Wood Robert Patricia Marshall Bowden AB 403 224-3928 R C CDC BATTLEFORD BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Nisbet Andrew E. Diane E. Bowden AB 403 224-3788 R Wagner Terry Loree Lacombe AB 403 782-2107 F R CDC BOW BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Wagner Terry Loree Lacombe AB 403 782-2107 S F CDC CLYDE BI CDC Dist CDC Krywko Ronald Sturgeon County AB 780 459-8224 S CDC COALITION BI CDC Dist Canterra Seeds Cross Douglas Westlock AB 780 349-2587 C Haney Farms Picture Butte AB 403 738-4517 R Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane L. New Norway AB 780 352-3240 C Plante Jacques St. Paul AB 780 645-4604 R C CDC COPELAND BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Carlson David Gwynne AB 780 352-6871 C Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 S R C Clark Todd Edmonton AB 780 499-5060 C 86 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Home Grown High Quality Canadian Seed BARLEY AC Meredith AC Metcalfe CDC Austenson CDC Copeland PEAS CDC Patrick CDC Meadow CDC Amarillo CDC Raezer HRS WHEAT CDC Go AAC Brandon Stettler CPS WHEAT AAC Ryley CANOLA Brett Young varieties Brett Young Forages available Bio Boost Nodulator XL Tag Team Ph 403-443-2577 Email tanyapenwestcanada.ca Three Hills AB On Site Services 90 scale on site Storm Seed Treater Mini bulk bagging shipping We multiply and deliver both traditional and the latest varieties of seed cereals BARLEY - AC Metcalfe - Busby - Canmore - CDC Austenson - CDC Coalition - CDC Copeland - CDC Cowboy - CDC Meredith - Chigwell - Vivar OATS - AC Morgan - AC Mustang - CDC Haymaker - CDC SeaBiscuit TRITICALE - Sunray WINTER WHEAT - Moats WHEAT - HRS AAC Brandon AAC Redwater Carberry CDC Plentiful CDC Utmost Harvest Muchmore Stettler - SWS Sadash - CPS Red AAC Penhold AAC Ryley AC Foremost PEAS - Cooper - CDC Amarillo - CDC Meadow - CDC Raezor - CDC Tetris - Thunderbird FABA BEANS - Snowbird PEDIGREED SEED FOR SALE SEED TREATING AVAILABLE P 780 349-3944 F 780 349-3623 E wscptelus.net www.westlockseed.ca 10016 93 Ave. Westlock AB Manager Wayne Walker T7P 2P2 Anderson Seed Growers Ltd. 780-674-5670 780-674-1941 Bar 3 Farms 780-348-5791 780-349-1434 Beamish Seed Farms Ltd. 780-954-2166 780-307-4742 Brian Miller 780-674-1240 Cross Seed Farms 780-349-1453 Cyre Seed Farms 780-349-4775 780-307-4246 780-307-4332 Dewindt Farms Ltd. 780-398-2377 Forward Seed Farms 780-307-4343 Galloway Seeds Ltd. 780-998-3036 McNelly Seed Farms Ltd. 780-348-5749 780-349-0685 Meinczinger Seed Farms Ltd. 780-349-2456 780-349-9515 MKM Joint Ventures 780-398-2336 780-699-4073 Nick Jonk 780-349-5458 780-349-0483 Ricks Pedigreed Seed 780-674-2595 780-305-9517 Trueblood Farms Ltd. 780-954-3745 780-349-0444 True Seeds Ltd. 780-777-5885 PROCESSORS RETAILERS FOR THE FOLLOWING GROWERS OVER 350000 BUSHELS OF PEDIGREED SEED STORAGE Dueck Ralph E. Brent Olds AB 403 556-2602 S F R Eliason Bruce W. Wrentham AB 403 222-2258 R C Ellis Brian Olds AB 403 556-2890 R Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 C Goldstrom David Red Deer County AB 403 227-2133 R C Hadway W. Tom Carol Didsbury AB 403 335-4929 C Hallett Dale R. Richard Carstairs AB 403 337-3072 C Hartzler Leonard Carstairs AB 403 337-2416 R C Jensen Colin Drumheller AB 403 820-0181 C Kemp Richard L. Red Deer County AB 403 227-4836 C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 R C Kittle James W. Andrew Viking AB 780 336-2583 C Knight William Craig Brian Tees AB 403 784-3633 C Kopjar Gerald M. Rowley AB 403 368-2409 R C Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane Luke New Norway AB 780 352-3240 C Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 R Massey Derwin Stettler AB 403 883-2503 C McNelly Bevin Clyde AB 780 348-5749 R C Mueller Richard R. R. Rosemary Barrhead AB 780 674-2595 C Murray Bruce Wesley Lethbridge AB 403 327-9389 C Niemela Terrance Tracy Sylvan Lake AB 403 746-2645 S C Nisbet Andrew E. Diane E. Bowden AB 403 224-3788 F R Penwest Seed Three Hills AB 403 443-2577 R C Richards Cliff Dan Sexsmith AB 780 766-2266 C Schmermund Donnie Sturgeon County AB 780 967-2850 C Selte Donald Vermilion AB 780 853-2484 C Shultz Shawn Didsbury AB 403 335-3694 C Sich Louis John Ivan Martin Trochu AB 403 442-2112 C Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 C Victoor Jesse Sturgeon County AB 780 459-3253 C Victoor Rene Jamie Sturgeon County AB 780 459-3253 R C Wagner Terry Loree Lacombe AB 403 782-2107 C Weigum Garry Sarah Three Hills AB 403 443-2476 C Zwack Seed Farms Daysland AB 780 374-2450 R C CDC COWBOY BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Airth Jock Linda Brooks AB 403 362-4372 C Selte Donald Vermilion AB 780 853-2484 C CDC FIBAR BI CDC Dist Canterra Seeds Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 S CDC HILOSE BI CDC Dist NA Sendziak Don P. Stephen Edmonton AB 780 434-1322 S CDC KINDERSLEY BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Goldstrom David Red Deer County AB 403 227-2133 C Hadway W. Tom Carol Didsbury AB 403 335-4929 C Knight William Craig Brian Tees AB 403 784-3633 C Niemela Terrance Tracy Sylvan Lake AB 403 746-2645 R C Oatway Grant Clive AB 403 784-3001 R Thompson M. Ellwood K. Red Deer County AB 403 728-3535 C Wagner Terry Loree Lacombe AB 403 782-2107 C Weigum Garry Sarah Three Hills AB 403 443-2476 C CDC MARLINA BI CDC Dist Canterra Seeds Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 S CDC MAVERICK BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 C Dechaine Louis St. Lina AB 780 635-2235 C Degenhardt Keith Terry Lee Kerry Hughenden AB 780 856-2383 R Hadland Edward Baldonnel BC 250 789-3646 R Hoffmann Curtis Oyen AB 403 664-9617 R McDonald Gerald Co. Of Grande Prairie 1 AB 780 538-3868 R Metzger Don Three Hills AB 403 572-3284 R Selte Donald Vermilion AB 780 853-2484 C Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 R C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 F R CDC MEREDITH BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Davidson E. Daryl Dean Kitscoty AB 780 846-2456 C Harris William P. Linda Thomas Alex Beaverlodge AB 780 354-2823 S F R Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 C McDonald Gerald Co. Of Grande Prairie 1 AB 780 538-3868 C Niemela Terrance Tracy Sylvan Lake AB 403 746-2645 C CDC THOMPSON BI CDC Dist FP Genetics Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 C 88 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Optical Colour Sorting Alliance Seed Cleaning Association Ltd. Commercial Pedigreed Separation Cleaning Peggy Erion Manager Ph 1-780-879-3927 Fax 1-780-879-2414 Email alliancwildroseinternet.ca Box 147 Alliance Alberta T0B 0A0 Complete Line of Processing Treating Bagging Facilities Feed Vet Supplies Grass Seed Sales cereals Thompson M. Ellwood Kelly Red Deer County AB 403 728-3535 R C CDC TREY BI CDC Dist FP Genetics Wood Robert Patricia Marshall Bowden AB 403 224-3928 S F R CERVEZA BI AAFC Brandon Dist Mastin Seeds Mastin Robert B. Sundre AB 403 556-2609 S R CHAMPION BI Highland Speicalty Grains Dist CPS Canada Inc. Schmermund Donnie Sturgeon County AB 780 967-2850 R CHIGWELL BI FCDC Lacombe Dist SeCan Members Anderson Ken Evelyn Barrhead AB 780 674-5670 C Feenstra Lloyd Barons AB 403 757-3737 C McDonald Grant Didsbury AB 403 335-8188 C Webber Curtis Stony Plain AB 780 963-6897 C CONLON BI NSDU Dist Seed Depot Airth Jock Linda Brooks AB 403 362-4372 C GADSBY BI FCDC Lacombe Dist SeCan Members Harris William P. Linda Thomas Alex Beaverlodge AB 780 354-2823 S F C Ohrn Norman Thorsby AB 780 985-2263 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 F Webber Curtis Stony Plain AB 780 963-6897 R LEGACY BI Busch Ag Res. Dist CPS Canada Inc.FP Genetics Wood Robert Patricia Marshall Bowden AB 403 224-3928 S C MERIT 57 BI Busch Ag Res. Dist Canterra Seeds Haney Farms Picture Butte AB 403 738-4517 C Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 F C NEWDALE BI AAFC Brandon Dist FP Genetics Dalton Dennis Wainwright AB 780 842-2361 C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 R PONOKA BI FCDC Lacombe Dist SeCan Members Webber Curtis Stony Plain AB 780 963-6897 C SEEBE BI FCDC Lacombe Dist SeCan Members Anderson Ken Evelyn Barrhead AB 780 674-5670 C Schmermund Donnie Sturgeon County AB 780 967-2850 C Webber Curtis Stony Plain AB 780 963-6897 C SUNDRE BI FCDC Lacombe Dist Mastin Seeds Feenstra Lloyd Barons AB 403 757-3737 R Hallett Dale R. Richard Carstairs AB 403 337-3072 C Jones Danny Beaverlodge AB 780 354-8089 R Mastin Robert B. Sundre AB 403 556-2609 R TROCHU BI FCDC Lacombe Dist SeCan Members Kittle James W. Andrew Viking AB 780 336-2583 C Smith Gary W. Eckville AB 403 746-5878 C Webber Curtis Stony Plain AB 780 963-6897 C VIVAR BI FCDC Lacombe Dist SeCan Members McDonald Grant Didsbury AB 403 335-8188 F R Witdouck Dale Iron Springs AB 403 738-4395 C OATS S F R C AC JUNIPER BI AAFC Lacombe Dist Mastin Seeds Tolway Wilfred Clairmont AB 780 567-2422 S F AC LU BI NA. Dist SeCan Members Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 C AC MORGAN BI AAFC Lacombe Dist SeCan Members Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 C Hill Gordon P. Blair Taylor BC 250 789-3469 C Jonk Nicholas Westlock AB 780 349-5458 C Kalinsky Dwayne Iron River AB 780 826-4452 C Kapitski Lawrence Andrew AB 780 365-2134 C Knight William Craig Brian Tees AB 403 784-3633 R C Massey Derwin Stettler AB 403 883-2503 C Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 89 cereals www.gdellis.com ellisxplornet.com NEW for 2016 AAC Synergy Barley 2 row malt from Syngenta Snowbird Faba Beans AAC PenholdShort Strong Straw High Yield CPS 2016 Seed Varieties AC Foremost CDC GO AAC Penhold AC Metcalfe CDC Austenson CDC Copeland Snowbird Faba Beans AAC Synergy Providing Superior Quality With Family Farm Customer Service McDonald Gerald Co. Of Grande Prairie 1 AB 780 538-3868 C Mueller Richard R. R. Rosemary Barrhead AB 780 674-2595 R Nemetz Charlie Jerritt Lewis Stettler AB 403 742-0436 R Niemela Terrance Tracy Sylvan Lake AB 403 746-2645 C Ohrn Norman Thorsby AB 780 985-2263 C Selte Donald Vermilion AB 780 853-2484 R C True Seeds Ltd. Redwater AB 780 777-5885 C Victoor Rene Jamie Sturgeon County AB 780 459-3253 R Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 F R C Webber Curtis Stony Plain AB 780 963-6897 C AC MUSTANG BI AAFC Lacombe Dist Mastin Seeds Feenstra Lloyd Barons AB 403 757-3737 C Hadland Edward Baldonnel BC 250 789-3646 R C Mastin Robert B. Sundre AB 403 556-2609 C Niemela Terrance Tracy Sylvan Lake AB 403 746-2645 C Richard Gerald Spirit River AB 780 864-2339 C CDC BALER BI CDC Dist FP Genetics Airth Jock Linda Brooks AB 403 362-4372 R Sand Ron W. David R. McLaughlin AB 780 745-2251 F Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 R Wood Robert Patricia Marshall Bowden AB 403 224-3928 C CDC HAYMAKER BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Degenhardt Keith Terry Lee Kerry Hughenden AB 780 856-2383 R Hoffmann Curtis Oyen AB 403 664-9617 C Jonk Nicholas Westlock AB 780 349-5458 C McDonald Gerald Co. Of Grande Prairie 1 AB 780 538-3868 C Selte Donald Vermilion AB 780 853-2484 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 S F R CDC NASSER BI CDC Dist NA Airth Jock Linda Brooks AB 403 362-4372 C Davidson E. Daryl Dean Kitscoty AB 780 846-2456 C Sand Ron W. David R. McLaughlin AB 780 745-2251 C CDC SEABISCUIT BI CDC Dist Canterra Seeds Jonk Nicholas Westlock AB 780 349-5458 C Sendziak Don P. Stephen Edmonton AB 780 434-1322 R CS CAMDEN BI Lantmannen SW Seed AB Dist Canterra Seeds Wuthrich David Cecil Lake BC 250 781-3527 S DERBY BI CDC Dist Mastin Seeds Mastin Robert B. Sundre AB 403 556-2609 R MURPHY BI AAFC Dist SeCan Members Webber Curtis Stony Plain AB 780 963-6897 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 F R C STRIDE BI AAFC Winnipeg Dist SeCan Members Jones Greg Thomas Ponoka AB 403 783-6495 F TRIACTOR BI SW Seed Ltd. Dist Canterra Seeds Wuthrich David Cecil Lake BC 250 781-3527 C WALDERN BI NA Dist SeCan Members Richard Gerald Spirit River AB 780 864-2339 C Selte Donald Vermilion AB 780 853-2484 C RYE S F R C BONO BI KWS Dist FP Genetics McNaughton Brian Lethbridge AB 403 308-9914 C BRASETTO BI KWS Dist FP Genetics McNaughton Brian Lethbridge AB 403 308-9914 C GUTTINO BI KWS Dist SeedNet Inc. McNaughton Brian Lethbridge AB 403 308-9914 C Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 C HAZLET BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Degenhardt Keith Terry Lee Kerry Hughenden AB 780 856-2383 F R Weigum Garry Sarah Three Hills AB 403 443-2476 C www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta90 cereals BULK SEED SEED FROM OUR STRONG ROOTS Be ready for the upcoming season Co-op Agro Centres have your bulk seed needs covered. Visit your local Co-op Agro Centre or www.CoopAg.ca for more details. LOCALLY INVESTED COMMUNITY MINDED LIFETIME MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS Buy Bulk Seed and WINSEEDTREATMENT MUSKETEER BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Degenhardt Keith Terry Lee Kerry Hughenden AB 780 856-2383 R PRIMA BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Weigum Sarah Three Hills AB 403 443-9599 C TRITICALE - SPRING S F R C AC ULTIMA BI AAFC Dist FP Genetics Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 R BREVIS BI AAFC Dist NA Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 S F BUNKER BI FCDC Lacombe Dist FP Genetics Airth Jock Linda Brooks AB 403 362-4372 C Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 C PRONGHORN BI AARD Dist No Rep Mans John Nobleford AB 403 824-3585 C SUNRAY BI AAFC Dist NA Benci Dennis Carmangay AB 403 643-2294 R C Fabian Patrick V. Tilley AB 403 377-2000 C Jonk Nicholas Westlock AB 780 349-5458 C Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 R TAZA BI FCDC Lacombe Dist Solick Seeds Corns Bryan Gary Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2464 R Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 F R C TYNDAL BI FCDC Lacombe Dist SeCan Members Airth Jock Linda Brooks AB 403 362-4372 C Dyck Heinz W. Colin Alan Kelton Rosemary AB 403 378-3321 S TRITICALE - WINTER S F R C METZGER BI FCDC Lacombe Dist Haney Farms Ltd Corns Bryan Gary Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2464 C Haney Farms Picture Butte AB 403 738-4517 S F C PIKA BI FCDC Lacombe Dist NA Kiffiak Nathan John Foremost AB 403 867-2338 S C WHEAT - DURUM S F R C AAC CONGRESS BI AAFC Swift Current Dist NA Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 S AAC CURRENT BI AAFC Swift Current Dist NA Hierath Michael Wayne Philip Milk River AB 403 647-2347 R C Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 C AAC RAYMORE BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Brummelhuis Tara Vauxhall AB 403 654-2734 C Hierath Michael Wayne Philip Milk River AB 403 647-2347 C Hoffmann Curtis Oyen AB 403 664-9617 C Kiffiak Nathan John Foremost AB 403 867-2338 R C Mercer Seeds Ltd. Lethbridge AB 403 327-9736 R C Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 F Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 C Willms Kevin J. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2450 S F R C AAC SPITFIRE BI AAFC Swift Current Dist NA Kiffiak Nathan John Foremost AB 403 867-2338 S R Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 R Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 F R Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 S F R CDC BRIGADE BI CDC Dist CPS Canada Inc. Willms Kevin J. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2450 F cereals 92 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta CDC COPELAND CDC MEADOW PEAS AC FOREMOST AC METCALFE CDC KINDERSLEY AAC REDWATER CDC HAYMAKER AAC RYLEY AAC PENHOLD CDC GREENWATER PEAS Telephone 403-335-4929 Email westwayairenet.com Select Growers Seed Processors CDC FORTITUDE BI CDC Dist CPS Canada Inc. Willms Kevin J. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2450 F C CDC VIVID BI CDC Dist CPS Canada Inc. Mercer Seeds Ltd. Lethbridge AB 403 327-9736 F R Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 C Willms Kevin J. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2450 F R C ENTERPRISE BI AAFC Swift Current Dist Canterra Seeds Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 C Van Roessel William Jean Bow Island AB 403 545-6018 R STRONGFIELD BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 C Crooymans John Joseph Andrew Bow Island AB 403 580-7264 C Hierath Michael Wayne Philip Milk River AB 403 647-2347 C Huvenaars Carl Hays AB 403 725-2213 C Willms Kevin J. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2450 C TRANSCEND BI AAFC Swift Current Dist FP Genetics Benci Dennis Carmangay AB 403 643-2294 R C Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 C Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 C Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 C Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 C Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 C WHEAT S F R C AAC BRANDON BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Baier Bill Dean Clyde AB 780 348-5791 R Benci Dennis Carmangay AB 403 643-2294 C Brummelhuis Tara Vauxhall AB 403 654-2734 R Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 R Clark Todd Edmonton AB 780 499-5060 R Crooymans John Joseph Andrew Bow Island AB 403 580-7264 C Cyre Clifford Greg Westlock AB 780 349-4775 R Dovichak Michael Brooks AB 403 501-5420 C Dyck Heinz W. Colin Alan Kelton Rosemary AB 403 378-3321 S F Haney Farms Picture Butte AB 403 738-4517 C Hoff Peter Edward Gleichen AB 403 734-2140 F R Hoffmann Curtis Oyen AB 403 664-9617 R Holst Todd Hays AB 403 725-2367 R Huvenaars John Lisa Hays AB 403 725-2126 R C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 R Kittle James W. Andrew Viking AB 780 336-2583 F R Kopjar Gerald M. Rowley AB 403 368-2409 S R Metzger Don Three Hills AB 403 572-3284 R Mueller Darcy Three Hills AB 403 820-4115 F Pare Raymond A. Wainwright AB 780 842-2073 S F Penwest Seed Three Hills AB 403 443-2577 R Sendziak Don P. Stephen Edmonton AB 780 434-1322 R Shultz Shawn Didsbury AB 403 335-3694 R Solick Seeds Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 F R Thompson M. Ellwood Kelly Red Deer County AB 403 728-3535 R Wagner Terry Loree Lacombe AB 403 782-2107 R Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 C Witdouck Dale Iron Springs AB 403 738-4395 R C Zwack Seed Farms Daysland AB 780 374-2450 R AAC CHIFFON BI AAFC Lethbridge Dist SeedNet Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 R Degenhardt Keith Terry Lee Kerry Hughenden AB 780 856-2383 R Huvenaars Carl Hays AB 403 725-2213 C Kiffiak Nathan John Foremost AB 403 867-2338 R Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 F R Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 R C Witdouck Dale Iron Springs AB 403 738-4395 R AAC ELIE BI AAFC Swift Current Dist Alliance Seed Hierath Michael Wayne Philip Milk River AB 403 647-2347 C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 R Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 C Mercer Seeds Ltd. Lethbridge AB 403 327-9736 C Sich Louis John Ivan Martin Trochu AB 403 442-2112 C Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 R C Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 93 cereals Van Roessel William Jean Bow Island AB 403 545-6018 C AAC INDUS BI AAFC Lethbridge Dist NA Kittle James W. Andrew Viking AB 780 336-2583 S AAC PENHOLD BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Anderson Ken Evelyn Barrhead AB 780 674-5670 C Baier Bill Dean Clyde AB 780 348-5791 F R Clark Todd Edmonton AB 780 499-5060 C Cyre Clifford Greg Westlock AB 780 349-4775 C Dewindt Harry Renee Thorhild AB 780 398-2377 C Diachyshyn Mike Waskatenau AB 780 691-7104 C Ellis Brian Olds AB 403 556-2890 C Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 S F R C Goldstrom David Red Deer County AB 403 227-2133 C Hadway W. Tom Carol Didsbury AB 403 335-4929 C Hallett Dale R. Richard Carstairs AB 403 337-3072 C Hoff Peter Edward Gleichen AB 403 734-2140 C Huvenaars Carl Hays AB 403 725-2213 C Jackson Thomas Killam AB 780 385-2332 R C Jones Greg Thomas Ponoka AB 403 783-6495 S Kemp Richard L. Red Deer County AB 403 227-4836 C Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane Luke New Norway AB 780 352-3240 F C Lopushinsky Julian Bruderheim AB 780 796-2048 C Macyk Don Waskatenau AB 780 358-2411 F C Macyk Tim Radway AB 780 699-4073 C Massey Derwin Stettler AB 403 883-2503 C Mueller Richard J. R. R. Rosemary Barrhead AB 780 674-2595 S F C Niemela Terrance Tracy Sylvan Lake AB 403 746-2645 C Nisbet Andrew E. Diane E. Bowden AB 403 224-3788 S F Oatway Ward Clive AB 403 784-3001 C Pare Raymond A. Wainwright AB 780 842-2073 S Radke Bryan Victor Barrhead AB 780 674-5715 S F C Sand Ron W. David R. McLaughlin AB 780 745-2251 R Sayer Roger Carstairs AB 403 337-5847 C Sendziak Don P. Stephen Edmonton AB 780 434-1322 C Thompson M. Ellwood Kelly Red Deer County AB 403 728-3535 S C True Seeds Ltd. Redwater AB 780 777-5885 C Trueblood Brian G. Dapp AB 780 954-3745 C Victoor Rene Jamie Sturgeon County AB 780 459-3253 C Wierenga Brad Bruce Clayton Neerlandia AB 780 674-4624 C Wood Robert Patricia Marshall Bowden AB 403 224-3928 C AAC REDWATER BI AAFC Winnipeg Dist SeCan Members Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 C Geeraert Gerald Rockyford AB 403 533-2421 C Hadland Edward Baldonnel BC 250 789-3646 R Hadway W. Tom Carol Didsbury AB 403 335-4929 R Hallett Dale R. Richard Carstairs AB 403 337-3072 R C Hegland David Olaf Wembley AB 780 766-2450 R Lopushinsky Julian Bruderheim AB 780 796-2048 C McDonald Gerald Co. Of Grande Prairie 1 AB 780 538-3868 R Mueller Darcy Three Hills AB 403 820-4115 S Oatway Ward Clive AB 403 784-3001 R Sekulic John Jr. Rycroft AB 780 765-2280 R Sekulic Warren F. Rycroft AB 780 765-2234 R Sendziak Don P. Stephen Edmonton AB 780 434-1322 R Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 S F R Weigum Garry Sarah Three Hills AB 403 443-2476 C Witdouck Dale Iron Springs AB 403 738-4395 C AAC RYLEY BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Amyotte Phillip Mallaig AB 780 635-4010 C Baier Bill Dean Clyde AB 780 348-5791 C Dargis Richard St. Vincent AB 780 635-2333 C Foster Norman R. Beaverlodge AB 780 354-2107 R Hadway W. Tom Carol Didsbury AB 403 335-4929 R Harris William P. Linda Thomas Alex Beaverlodge AB 780 354-2823 F Kopjar Gerald M. Rowley AB 403 368-2409 R Ohrn Norman Thorsby AB 780 985-2263 R Penwest Seed Three Hills AB 403 443-2577 R Shultz Shawn Didsbury AB 403 335-3694 S C AC ANDREW BI AAFC Lethbridge Dist SeCan Members Degenhardt Keith Terry Lee Kerry Hughenden AB 780 856-2383 R C Kittle James W. Andrew Viking AB 780 336-2583 C Sand Ron W. David R. McLaughlin AB 780 745-2251 R AC CRYSTAL BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Pare Raymond A. Wainwright AB 780 842-2073 C AC DOMAIN BI AAFC Dist SeCan Members Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 F AC FOREMOST BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Beamish Dale Jarvie AB 780 954-2166 C Clark Todd Edmonton AB 780 499-5060 C Ellis Brian Olds AB 403 556-2890 C Jackson James D. Dapp AB 780 954-2617 C Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane Luke New Norway AB 780 352-3240 C Macyk Tim Radway AB 780 699-4073 C Nanninga Justin Neerlandia AB 780 674-3822 C Nisbet Andrew E. Diane E. Bowden AB 403 224-3788 R Radke Bryan Victor Barrhead AB 780 674-5715 R Schmermund Donnie Sturgeon County AB 780 967-2850 R Smith Gary W. Eckville AB 403 746-5878 C Victoor Rene Jamie Sturgeon County AB 780 459-3253 F R C Webber Curtis Stony Plain AB 780 963-6897 C Wood Robert Patricia Marshall Bowden AB 403 224-3928 R cereals 94 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Box 1828 Brooks AB T1R 1C6 Phone 403-501-5420 Fax 403-501-5421 jmdovicheidnet.org Michael Janet Dovichak 387099 Alberta Ltd. AC Stettler Certified AC Carberry Certified CDC Go Certified CDCGlasrec. Certified AACBrandon Certified CARBERRY BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Brummelhuis Tara Vauxhall AB 403 654-2734 C Cailliau John Enchant AB 403 739-3785 R Card Gordon B. Magrath AB 403 758-3444 C Crooymans John Joseph Andrew Bow Island AB 403 580-7264 C Dyck Heinz W. Colin Alan Kelton Rosemary AB 403 378-3321 R Haney Farms Picture Butte AB 403 738-4517 C Jonk Nicholas Westlock AB 780 349-5458 R C Kopjar Gerald M. Rowley AB 403 368-2409 F R C Lopushinsky Julian Bruderheim AB 780 796-2048 C Macyk Tim Radway AB 780 699-4073 C Nanninga Justin Neerlandia AB 780 674-3822 C Schmermund Donnie Sturgeon County AB 780 967-2850 C Strain Arthur George Foremost AB 403 867-2227 S F Witdouck Dale Iron Springs AB 403 738-4395 C CARDALE BI AAFC Winnipeg Dist Seed Depot Crooymans John Joseph Andrew Bow Island AB 403 580-7264 C Fabian Patrick V. Tilley AB 403 377-2000 C Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 C Van Roessel William Jean Bow Island AB 403 545-6018 C CDC BRADWELL BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Mercer Seeds Ltd. Lethbridge AB 403 327-9736 S CDC GO BI CDC Dist Mastin Seeds Brummelhuis Tara Vauxhall AB 403 654-2734 R Crooymans John Joseph Andrew Bow Island AB 403 580-7264 C Huvenaars Carl Hays AB 403 725-2213 C Kemp Richard L. Red Deer County AB 403 227-4836 C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 C Limoges Richard McLennan AB 780 324-2335 C Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 R Metzger Don Three Hills AB 403 572-3284 C Murray Bruce Wesley Lethbridge AB 403 327-9389 F C Penwest Seed Three Hills AB 403 443-2577 R C Pepneck David Vauxhall AB 403 424-0096 C Schmermund Donnie Sturgeon County AB 780 967-2850 F R Sich Louis John Ivan Martin Trochu AB 403 442-2112 C Templeton Doran Brant Lethbridge AB 403 345-4144 C Weigum Garry Sarah Three Hills AB 403 443-2476 C CDC OSLER BI CDC Dist NA Hill Gordon P. Blair Taylor BC 250 789-3469 R C CDC PLENTIFUL BI CDC Dist FP Genetics Dalton Dennis Wainwright AB 780 842-2361 R Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 S R C Hoff Peter Edward Gleichen AB 403 734-2140 C Kapitski Lawrence Andrew AB 780 365-2134 R C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 F R C Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane L. New Norway AB 780 352-3240 C Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 R Massey Derwin Stettler AB 403 883-2503 C Sand Ron W. David R. McLaughlin AB 780 745-2251 F R Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 C Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 S F C Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 S F C Victoor Rene Jamie Sturgeon County AB 780 459-3253 C CDC STANLEY BI CDC Dist CPS Canada Inc. Harbin Clifford T. Bruce C. Rivercourse AB 780 745-2268 C COLEMAN BI U of Alberta Dist NA Hill Gordon P. Blair Taylor BC 250 789-3469 R Macyk Don Waskatenau AB 780 358-2411 C GO EARLY BI U of Alberta Dist Mastin Seeds Mastin Robert B. Sundre AB 403 556-2609 S F Templeton Doran Brant Lethbridge AB 403 345-4144 R HARVEST BI AAFC Winnipeg Dist FP Genetics Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 R C Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane L. New Norway AB 780 352-3240 C Victoor Rene Jamie Sturgeon County AB 780 459-3253 R C Wood Robert Patricia Marshall Bowden AB 403 224-3928 F R LILLIAN BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Hierath Michael Wayne Philip Milk River AB 403 647-2347 C Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 C Willms Kevin J. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2450 F MUCHMORE BI AAFC Swift Current Dist FP Genetics Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 R C Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 F R C Harbin Clifford T. Bruce C. Rivercourse AB 780 745-2268 C Kapitski Lawrence Andrew AB 780 365-2134 C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 C Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane Luke New Norway AB 780 352-3240 R C Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 F Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 C Massey Derwin Stettler AB 403 883-2503 R C Nanninga Justin Neerlandia AB 780 674-3822 R Sand Ron W. David R. McLaughlin AB 780 745-2251 C Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 R Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 R Thompson M. Ellwood K. Red Deer County AB 403 728-3535 C True Seeds Ltd. Redwater AB 780 777-5885 R C Victoor Rene Jamie Sturgeon County AB 780 459-3253 S F C PASTEUR BI Wiersum Plant Breeding DistL SeCan Members Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane L. New Norway AB 780 352-3240 C Mueller Darcy Three Hills AB 403 820-4115 S Templeton Doran Brant Lethbridge AB 403 345-4144 C SADASH BI AAFC Lethbridge Dist SeCan Members Feenstra Lloyd Barons AB 403 757-3737 C Haney Farms Picture Butte AB 403 738-4517 C Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 C Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 R C Witdouck Dale Iron Springs AB 403 738-4395 R C Zwack Seed Farms Daysland AB 780 374-2450 C SNOWBIRD BI AAFC Winnipeg Dist FP Genetics Massey Derwin Stettler AB 403 883-2503 C Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 95 Tom Measures Manager Barrhead District Seed Cleaning Co-op Ltd. Pedigreed and Commercial Seed Cleaning andSeed Sales. Box 4408 Barrhead Alberta T7N 1A3 Email barrseedtelus.net Phone 780 674-2569 Fax 780 674-3701 cereals STETTLER BI AAFC Winnipeg Dist SeCan Members Baier Bill Dean Clyde AB 780 348-5791 C Clark Todd Edmonton AB 780 499-5060 C Davidson E. Daryl Dean Kitscoty AB 780 846-2456 C Foster Norman R. Beaverlodge AB 780 354-2107 C Harris William Linda Thomas Alex Beaverlodge AB 780 354-2823 F R Kalinsky Dwayne Iron River AB 780 826-4452 C Kapitski Lawrence Andrew AB 780 365-2134 C Kittle James W. Andrew Viking AB 780 336-2583 C Limoges Richard McLennan AB 780 324-2335 C Massey Derwin Stettler AB 403 883-2503 C McDonald Gerald Co. Of Grande Prairie 1 AB 780 538-3868 C Mracek Stan John Dawson Creek BC 250 843-7359 R C Nemetz Charlie Jerritt Lewis Brandon Stettler AB 403 742-0436 C Pare Raymond A. Wainwright AB 780 842-2073 R Penwest Seed Three Hills AB 403 443-2577 R C Wagner Terry Loree Lacombe AB 403 782-2107 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 C SUPERB BI AAFC Winnipeg Dist SeCan Members Airth Jock Linda Brooks AB 403 362-4372 R Jones Danny Beaverlodge AB 780 354-8089 C SY985 BI Syngenta Canada Inc. Dist Cargill Ltd. CPS Canada inc. and Andrukow Seed Harbin Clifford T. Bruce C. Rivercourse AB 780 745-2268 C THORSBY BI U of Alberta Dist Canterra Seeds Richards Cliff Dan Sexsmith AB 780 766-2266 R WHEAT - MIDGE TOLERANT S F R C ACR Eligible pedigreed class for crops subject to developers post-harvest Additional Certification Requirements such as seed testing required for varieties of midge tolerant wheat. BW971 - BW965 BI NA Dist NA Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 S Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 S Sand Ron W. David R. McLaughlin AB 780 745-2251 S Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 S CDC UTMOST - HARVEST BI NA Dist FP Genetics Dalton Dennis Wainwright AB 780 842-2361 R C Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 R Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 C Sand Ron W. David R. McLaughlin AB 780 745-2251 R True Seeds Ltd. Redwater AB 780 777-5885 C CONQUER - 5701PR BI AAFC Winnipeg Dist Canterra Seeds Parkland Fertilizers Wetaskiwin AB 780 352-3359 C AgLand Seed and Chemical La Crete AB 780 928-0096 C Rasmussen Brian Joel Standard AB 403 644-3800 F C AAC TENATIOUS VB BI NA Dist Alliance Seed Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 F SHAW - AC DOMAIN BI AAFC Winnipeg Dist SeCan Members Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 R AAC MARCHWELL - AAC RAYMORE BI AAFC Swift Current Dist SeCan Members Hierath Michael Wayne Philip Milk River AB 403 647-2347 R WHEAT - WINTER S F R C AAC GATEWAY BI AAFC Dist Seed Depot Mercer Seeds Ltd. Lethbridge AB 403 327-9736 R Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 R Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 F Van Roessel William Jean Bow Island AB 403 545-6018 R Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 R C AC TEMPEST BI AAFC Lethbridge Dist SeCan Members Murray Bruce Wesley Lethbridge AB 403 327-9389 R CDC CHASE BI CDC Dist Canterra Seeds Benci Dennis Carmangay AB 403 643-2294 S F EMERSON BI AAFC Dist Canterra Seeds Airth Jock Linda Brooks AB 403 362-4372 F Corns Bryan Gary Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2464 R C Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 R FLOURISH BI AAFC Lethbridge Dist SeCan Members Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 C MOATS BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 C Macyk Tim Radway AB 780 699-4073 C Mercer Seeds Ltd. Lethbridge AB 403 327-9736 C Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 C Strain Arthur George Foremost AB 403 867-2227 C RADIANT BI AAFC Lethbridge Dist Canterra Seeds Airth Jock Linda Brooks AB 403 362-4372 C Corns Bryan Gary Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2464 C Crooymans John Joseph Bow Island AB 403 580-7264 C Haney Farms Picture Butte AB 403 738-4517 C cereals 96 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Fusion BI DL Seeds Dist SeCan Members McDonald Gerald Co. Of Grande Prairie 1 AB 780 538-3868 C Selte Donald Vermilion AB 780 853-2484 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 C InVigor Canola Varieties InVigor 5440 InVigor L120 InVigor L130 InVigor L135C InVigor L140P InVigor L150 InVigor L156H InVigor L157H InVigor L159 InVigor L241C InVigor L252 InVigor L261 BI NA Dist Bayer CropScience Bayer CropScience Inc. Lethbridge AB 403 329-0706 C Proven Seed Varieties PV 530 G PV 531 G PV 533 G PV 580 GC VT 500 G PV 200 CL VR 9560 CL XCEED X121 CL XCEED X122 CL BI NA Dist CPS Canada Inc CPS Canada Inc. High River 306 480-8520 C Rugby BI DL Seeds Dist SeCan Members Hadland Edward Baldonnel BC 250 789-3646 C McDonald Gerald Co. Of Grande Prairie 1 AB 780 538-3868 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 C SY4105 SY4157 SY4166 BI NA Dist NA Syngenta Canada Inc. 1-877-964-3682 C VR9562GC BI NA Dist CPS Canada Inc Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc. Lethbridge AB 403 327-6135 C CANOLA - RAPA S F R C EARLY ONE BI AAFC Dist Mastin Seeds Mastin Robert B. Sundre AB 403 556-2609 C SYNERGY BI AAFC Dist SeCan Members McDonald Gerald Co. Of Grande Prairie 1 AB 780 538-3868 C CANOLA - NAPUS S F R C 45CS40 45CS41 45H33 45H76 46H75 BI NA Dist DuPont Pioneer Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc. Lethbridge AB 403 327-6135 C 5525CL BI DL Seeds Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C 5535 CL BI DL Seeds Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C 6056CR BI DL Seeds Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C 6074 RR BI DL Seeds Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C DEKALB Brand Varieties 73-15 RR 73-45 RR 73-75 RR 74-44 BL 74-54 RR 75-45 RR 75-65 RR BI NA Dist Monsanto Canada Inc. Monsanto Canada Inc. Lethbridge AB 403 360-8043 C CAFE BI SW Seed Dist SeCan Members Degenhardt Keith Terry Lee Kerry Hughenden AB 780 856-2383 C Hadland Edward Baldonnel BC 250 789-3646 C CS2000 BI DL Seeds Dist Canterra Seeds Canterra Seeds Ltd. Winnipeg MB 204 988-9750 C CS2100 BI NA Dist Canterra Seeds Canterra Seeds Ltd. Winnipeg MB 204 988-9750 C CS2200CL BI DL Seeds Dist Canterra Seeds Canterra Seeds Ltd. Winnipeg MB 204 988-9750 C 97Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 canola CANOLA SEED DISTRIBUTORS For additional canola varieties available for purchase and detailed variety information please contact these canola seed distributors. BASF 1-800-371- 2273 www.agsolutions.ca Bayer CropScience 1-888-283-6847 www.bayercropscience.ca BrettYoung 1-800-665-5015 www.brettyoung.ca Canterra Seeds Ltd. 204 988-9750 www.canterra.com Cargill Specialty Seeds Oils 1-800-323-6232 www.victorycanola.com DEKALB CanadaMonsanto Canada Inc. 1-800-667-4944 www.DEKALB.ca DL Seeds 204 331-2361 www.dlseeds.ca Dow AgroSciences 1-800-667-3852 www.dowagro.ca DuPont Pioneer 306 385-3001 www.pioneer.comcanada Mastin Seeds 403 556-2609 www.mastinseeds.com Proven SeedCPS Canada Inc. 306 480-8520 provenseed.ca SeCan 800-665-7333 www.secan.com Syngenta Canada Inc. 1-877-964-3682 www.syngentafarm.ca ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Canola Council of Canada 1-866-834-4378 www.canolacouncil.org Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development 310-FARM 3276 www.agriculture.alberta.ca Alberta Canola Producers Commission 1-800-551-6652 www.canola.ab.ca ax FLAX S F R C AAC BRAVO BI AAFC Lacombe Dist FP Genetics Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 R Dalton Dennis Wainwright AB 780 842-2361 C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 R Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 S F Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 C PRAIRIE SAPPHIRE BI AAFC Morden Dist SeCan Members Feenstra Lloyd Barons AB 403 757-3737 R Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 R TAURUS BI NA Dist FP Genetics Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 R WESTLIN 70 BI NA Dist CPS Canada Inc. Mercer Seeds Ltd. Lethbridge AB 403 327-9736 R C FLAX - RECONSTITUTED S F R C ACR Eligible pedigreed class for crops subject to developers post-harvest Additional Certification Requirements such as seed testing required for varieties of reconstituted ax. CDC GLAS BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Cailliau John Enchant AB 403 739-3785 C Corns Bryan Gary Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2464 C Dovichak Michael Brooks AB 403 501-5420 C Dyck Heinz W. Colin Alan Kelton Rosemary AB 403 378-3321 C Fabian Patrick V. Tilley AB 403 377-2000 C Hoff Peter Edward Gleichen AB 403 734-2140 S F C Hoffmann Curtis Oyen AB 403 664-9617 C Huvenaars Carl Hays AB 403 725-2213 C Huvenaars John Lisa Hays AB 403 725-2126 C Jackson Thomas Killam AB 780 385-2332 R Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 C Weigum Garry Sarah Three Hills AB 403 443-2476 R C Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 C CDC SANCTUARY BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Benci Dennis Carmangay AB 403 643-2294 R Huvenaars Carl Hays AB 403 725-2213 C CDC SORREL BI CDC Dist SeCan Members Bright David New Norway AB 780 855-2240 R Degenhardt Keith Terry Kerry Hughenden AB 780 856-2383 R King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 R C Sendziak Don P. Stephen Edmonton AB 780 434-1322 C Zwack Seed Farms Daysland AB 780 374-2450 R ALFALFA S F R C 2010 BI NA Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C 3010 BI NA Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. Anderson Stephen F. Scandia AB 403 362-5886 C BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C 4010BR BI NA Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C Douglass Leslie Gem AB 403 641-2227 C 4020MF BI NA Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C 54Q14 BI NA Dist DuPont Pioneer Vanderstoel Jeroen Maureen Enchant AB 403 654-2653 C 55Q27 BI NA Dist DuPont Pioneer Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc. Lethbridge AB 403 327-6135 C Witdouck Dale Iron Springs AB 403 738-4395 C hayandpasturecrops 98 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta ABLE BI NA Dist DLF Pickseed Baerg Ken Bow Island AB 403 545-6023 C ADRENALIN BI NA Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C ALGONQUIN BI NA Dist Pask Farms Ltd. Cailliau John Enchant AB 403 739-3785 C ASCEND BI NA Dist La Coop Federee BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C BARRICADE SLT BI NA Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 C DALTON BI AAFC Dist AAFC Vanderstoel Jeroen Maureen Enchant AB 403 654-2653 C EQUINOX BI Forage Genetics Dist CPS Canada Inc. Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C Jakobsen Brent Tilley AB 403 377-2980 C Nikkel Ed Lethbridge AB 403 792-2116 C FORTUNE BI NA Dist DLF Pickseed Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C GENEVA BI Novaris Dist CPS Canada Inc. Slomp Karl Brooks AB 403 362-2156 C HALO BI NA Dist CPS Canada Inc. Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C INSTINCT BI NA Dist DLF Pickseed Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C LEGENDAIRY 5.0 BI NA Dist Agronomy Company of Canada Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C LEGENDAIRY XHD BI NA Dist Gold Medal Seeds Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C Torkelson Herbe Duchess AB 403 501-4891 F C LELIA BI NA Dist Quality Seeds Ltd. Nikkel Ed Lethbridge AB 403 792-2116 C MASKA BI AAFC Dist AAFC Claassen Louis Maryden Vauxhall AB 403 654-4441 C Vanderstoel Jeroen Maureen Enchant AB 403 654-2653 C PICKSEED 2065MF BI NA Dist DLF Pickseed Dyck Craig Rosemary AB 403 378-4444 C PICKSEED 3006 BI NA Dist DLF Pickseed Peltzer David Duchess AB 403 378-4577 C POWER 4.2 BI NA Dist Power Seed Inc. Nikkel Ed Lethbridge AB 403 792-2116 C PRIZE BI NA Dist DLF Pickseed Jacobson Lynn Enchant AB 403 739-2153 C REBOUND PLUS BI NA Dist Gold Medal Seeds Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C Nikkel Ed Lethbridge AB 403 792-2116 C SHOCKWAVE-BR BI NA Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C SPREDOR 4 BI Forage Genetics Dist CPS Canada Inc. Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C Nikkel Ed Lethbridge AB 403 792-2116 C SPREDOR 5 BI NA Dist Gold Medal Seeds Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C Nikkel Ed Lethbridge AB 403 792-2116 C hayandpasturecrops Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 99 haneyfarms Cereals Canola Corn Triticale Seed Cleaning and Seed Treating Box 280 Picture Butte AB Toll Free 877-738-4517 Fax 403-738-4420 Email ssmithhaneyfarms.com WWW.HANEYFARMS.COM Pedigreed Seed Since 1937 X59 PEDIGREED HEMP SEED HEMPNUT Great yield shatter resistance large seed desired by processors Wiens Family Farms Inc. Box 39 Lomond AB T0L 1G0 wiensdstelus.net 403 739-3762 STOCKPILE BI NA Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. Giesbrecht Peter W. Vauxhall AB 403 622-2297 C Versteegen Erik Rolling Hills AB 403 964-2740 C STRONGHOLD BI NA Dist Gold Medal Seeds Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C SURVIVOR BI NA Dist Seed-Link Inc. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C VALID BI NA Dist Quality Seeds Ltd. Nikkel Ed Lethbridge AB 403 792-2116 C VERDANT BI NA Dist Gold Medal Seeds Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C Jakobsen Brent Tilley AB 403 377-2980 C VISION BI NA Dist DLF Pickseed Dyck Daryl Rosemary AB 403 378-3804 C VR TOTAL BI NA Dist CPS Canada Inc. Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C WL 319HQ BI NA Dist Gold Medal Seeds Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C WL353LH BI NA Dist Gold Medal Seeds Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 C WL354HQ BI NA Dist Gold Medal Seeds Gold Medal Seeds Limited Brooks AB 403 362-3444 F C YELLOWHEAD BI AAFC Dist AAFC Kerschbaumer John A. Fairview AB 780 835-4508 C BROMEGRASS S F R C AC KNOWLES BI AAFC Saskatoon Dist CPS Canada Inc. Dechant Clem Hotchkiss AB 780 836-2715 C Hanson A. Serle Valhalla Centre AB 780 358-2286 C ADMIRAL BI NA Dist AAFC Card Gordon B. Magrath AB 403 758-3444 C CARLTON BI AAFC Saskatoon Dist Phillips Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C Hadland Edward Baldonnel BC 250 789-3646 F C Kerschbaumer John A. Fairview AB 780 835-4508 C Noble Robert Manning AB 780 836-2337 C Sallis Gary Manning AB 780 836-2381 C FLEET BI AAFC Saskatoon Dist SeCan Members BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C Dynamic Seeds Ltd. Fairview AB 780 835-5435 C hayandpasturecrops Hadland Edward Baldonnel BC 250 789-3646 F C Hanson Troy Valhalla Centre AB 587 343-2286 C Kerschbaumer John A. Fairview AB 780 835-4508 C Van Garderen Case Picture Butte AB 403 738-4203 C Vanderstoel Jeroen Maureen Enchant AB 403 654-2653 C MANCHAR BI NA Dist No Rep Dynamic Seeds Ltd. Fairview AB 780 835-5435 C Obrigewitch Trevor Fairview AB 780 835-4763 C CICER MILKVETCH S F R C ARC ASPEN BI NA Dist NA Andersen Terry Bon Accord AB 780 916-5712 C CLOVER S F R C AURORA BI AAFC Beaverlodge Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 F C Limoges Daniel Girouxville AB 780 833-1287 C FRIDA BI NA Dist NA BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 F NORGOLD BI NA Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C FESCUE S F R C BOREAL BI AAFC Beaverlodge Dist CPS Canada Ltd. Carlstad Tyler Bear Canyon AB 780 835-0505 C Dynamic Seeds Ltd. Fairview AB 780 835-5435 C Hill Gordon P. Blair Taylor BC 250 789-3469 C Jones Danny Beaverlodge AB 780 354-8089 C Moore Seed Processors Inc. Debolt AB 780 957-3964 C Richard Gerald Spirit River AB 780 864-2339 C ORACLE BI AAFC Beaverlodge Dist CPS Canada Ltd. Hegland David Olaf Wembley AB 780 766-2450 C Longson A. Keith Beaverlodge AB 780 831-7998 C PREVAL BI NA Dist Northstar Seed Ltd. Dynamic Seeds Ltd. Fairview AB 780 835-5435 C www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta100 Coronation Seed Cleaning Co-op Ltd. Glen Hartel Manager P.O. Box 178 Coronation AB T0C 1C0 Ph. 403-578-3810 Fax. 403-578-3041 Res. 403-578-3198 Web httpwww.seed.ab.caplantscoronation E-mail coroseedxplornet.com Justin Nanninga 780-307-4343 Dawna Nanninga 780-307-4380 E forwardseedfarmgmail.com 2505 TWP RD 620 County of Barrhead AB T0G 1R2 HRS Muchmore and Carberry CPS Foremost Yellow Peas Abarth Cover Crops Tillage Radishes and Turnips ORCHARDGRASS S F R C KILLARNEY BI NA Dist AAFC Card Gordon B. Magrath AB 403 758-3444 C RYEGRASS S F R C NORLEA BI NA Dist SeCan Members Hadland Edward Baldonnel BC 250 789-3646 C SWIFT BI NA Dist SeCan Members Whitney David Fairview AB 780 835-4897 C TIMOTHY S F R C ALMA BI NA Dist Moore Seed Processors Inc. Moore Seed Processors Inc. Debolt AB 780 957-3964 F C BARPENTA BI NA Dist Union Forage Dynamic Seeds Ltd. Fairview AB 780 835-5435 C CLIMAX BI NA Dist DLF Pickseed BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C COMTAL BI NA Dist DLF Pickseed BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C Moore Seed Processors Inc. Debolt AB 780 957-3964 C DERBY BI NA Dist Growmark Inc. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C DOLINA BI NA Dist Semican BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C PROMESSE BI BrettYoung Seeds Ltd Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C RICHMOND BI NA Dist DLF Pickseed Turner Lorne Eckville AB 403 746-5831 C SUMMERGRAZE BI NA Dist BrettYoung Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C TENHO BI Boreal Plant Breeding Finland Dist Moore Seed Processors Inc. Moore Seed Processors Inc. Debolt AB 780 957-3964 C TIFFANY BI NA Dist Seed-Link Inc. Dynamic Seeds Ltd. Fairview AB 780 835-5435 C TILLER BI NA Dist DLF Pickseed Coons Stanley Bonanza AB 780 353-2381 C hayandpasturecrops TITAN LISCHKA IN GERMANY BI NA Dist Northstar Seed Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C TUUKKA BI Boreal Plant Breeding Finland Dist Moore Seed Processors Inc. Moore Seed Processors Inc. Debolt AB 780 957-3964 C WINNETOU BI NA Dist Parsons Seeds Ltd. BrettYoung Seeds Limited Rycroft AB 780 765-3069 C WHEATGRASS S F R C AC SALTLANDER BI AAFC Swift Current Dist NA Miller Kenneth F. Milk River AB 403 647-2127 F C ELBEE BI NA Dist SeCan Members Limoges Daniel Girouxville AB 780 833-1287 F FAIRWAY BI NA Dist FP Genetics Whitney David Fairview AB 780 835-4897 C GREENLEAF BI NA Dist SeCan Members Card Gordon B. Magrath AB 403 758-3444 C KIRK BI AAFC Saskatoon Dist SeCan Members Dynamic Seeds Ltd. Fairview AB 780 835-5435 C Hadland Arthur Austin Baldonnel BC 250 789-3566 C Limoges Daniel Girouxville AB 780 833-1287 F C NEWKIRK BI NA Dist AAFC Limoges Daniel Girouxville AB 780 833-1287 F NORDAN BI NA Dist No Rep Schiebout Everett H. Barons AB 403 757-3757 C Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 101 Wheat Oats Barley Canola Peas Faba Beans TF 800 444-8961 P 780 352-3240 F 780 352-6943 RR1 New Norway Alberta T0B 3L0 lindholmseedxplornet.com specialcrops BEANS S F R C CDC MARMOT BI CDC Dist NA Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 R CHICKPEAS S F R C CDC ORION BI CDC Dist NA Kiffiak Nathan John Foremost AB 403 867-2338 S FABA BEANS S F R C CDC SNOWDROP BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Airth Jock Linda Brooks AB 403 362-4372 R C Jackson Thomas Killam AB 780 385-2332 C Kittle James W. Andrew Viking AB 780 336-2583 R Klempnauer Joerg Vauxhall AB 403 655-2420 F Kopjar Gerald M. Rowley AB 403 368-2409 F Murray Bruce Wesley Lethbridge AB 403 327-9389 C Pare Raymond A. Wainwright AB 780 842-2073 S F Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 S F C Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 S C CDC SSNS-1 BICDC Dist NA Plett Donald H. Gem AB 403 641-2494 R SNOWBIRD BI Innoseeds Dist Bob Park Cyre Clifford Greg Westlock AB 780 349-4775 F R C Ellis Brian Olds AB 403 556-2890 C Foster Norman R. Beaverlodge AB 780 354-2107 C Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 C Harbin Clifford T. Bruce C. Rivercourse AB 780 745-2268 C Hegland David Olaf Wembley AB 780 766-2450 C Jackson Thomas Killam AB 780 385-2332 C Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane L. New Norway AB 780 352-3240 S F R C Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 S F C Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 C Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 C True Seeds Ltd. Redwater AB 780 777-5885 C Weigum Garry Sarah Three Hills AB 403 443-2476 C Zwack Seed Farms Daysland AB 780 374-2450 C TABASCO BI Norddeutsche Pfanzenzucht Dist DL Seeds Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 F C HEMP S F R C HEMPNUT BI NA Dist NA Wiens David Paul Lomond AB 403 739-3762 C LENTILS S F R C CDC GREENSTAR BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 R Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 R CDC IMAX BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Hoffmann Curtis Oyen AB 403 664-9617 C Kiffiak Nathan John Foremost AB 403 867-2338 S F CDC IMPULSE BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Kiffiak Nathan John Foremost AB 403 867-2338 S Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 S F CDC MARBLE BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 F 102 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta Markert Seeds Ltd. AC Metcalfe AC Copeland CDC Austenson Muchmore AC Conquer AAC Chiffon Utmost VB CDC Go CDC Plentiful AC Transcend CDC Saffron Snowbird Sunray Ron Lee Markert Box 1150 Vulcan Alberta T0L 2B0 403-485-6708 www.markertseeds.com infomarkertseeds.com AAC Lacombe Peas Foundation Registered Available to Approved SeedNet Associate Growers AAC Chiffon Wheat Soft White Spring Wheat Available Spring 2016 BARLEY CDC Coalition CDC Copeland CDC Austenson CDC Thompson CANOLA Roundup Ready Liberty Link PEAS CDC Limerick CDC Saffron FABABEANS Snowbird WINTER WHEAT Moats A CSGA Member since 1946 Treating of Cereal Seeds and Pulses Available Inoculation of Pulses Available WHEAT AAC Penhold AAC Redwater CDC Utmost Harvest AC Foremost Muchmore CDC Plentiful Stettler 54174 Range Rd. 225 Fort Saskatchewan Alberta T8L 3Z9 E-Mail gallseedgallowayseeds.com Bus. 780 998-3036 Fax 780 998-1288 Contact Jim Galloway Dan Visser CCA or Dave King to book seed. Website Coming Soon CDC MAXIM BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 C Richard Gerald Spirit River AB 780 864-2339 R MUSTARD S F R C ANDANTE BI NA Dist AAFC Saskatoon Mercer Seeds Ltd. Lethbridge AB 403 327-9736 F C CENTENNIAL BI NA Dist AAFC Saskatoon Mercer Seeds Ltd. Lethbridge AB 403 327-9736 F C PEAS S F R C AAC BARRHEAD BI NA Dist AAFC Mueller Richard J. R. R. Rosemary Barrhead AB 780 674-2595 S AAC CARVER BI NA Dist AAFC Wuthrich David Cecil Lake BC 250 781-3527 S AAC LACOMBE BI AAFC Dist SeedNet Benci Dennis Carmangay AB 403 643-2294 S F Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 S F Kiffiak Nathan John Foremost AB 403 867-2338 S F R Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 S F R Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 S F R Mercer Seeds Ltd. Lethbridge AB 403 327-9736 F Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 F Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 F R Van Roessel William Jean Bow Island AB 403 545-6018 F Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 S F R Witdouck Dale Iron Springs AB 403 738-4395 R AAC PEACE RIVER BI AAFC Dist FP Genetics Hadland Edward Baldonnel BC 250 789-3646 S F R C ABARTH BI Limagrain Dist FP Genetics Airth Jock Linda Brooks AB 403 362-4372 C Dalton Dennis Wainwright AB 780 842-2361 C Harbin Clifford T. Bruce C. Rivercourse AB 780 745-2268 C Massey Derwin Stettler AB 403 883-2503 C Nanninga Justin Neerlandia AB 780 674-3822 C Sand Ron W. David R. McLaughlin AB 780 745-2251 R C Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 S F CDC AMARILLO BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Airth Jock Linda Brooks AB 403 362-4372 C Brummelhuis Tara Vauxhall AB 403 654-2734 R Harbin Clifford T. Bruce C. Rivercourse AB 780 745-2268 R C Hill Gordon P. Blair Taylor BC 250 789-3469 S Hoff Peter Edward Gleichen AB 403 734-2140 S F R Hoffmann Curtis Oyen AB 403 664-9617 C Jacula Dean S. Shawn D. Vermilion AB 780 581-9011 C Kapitski Lawrence Andrew AB 780 365-2134 R C Limoges Richard McLennan AB 780 324-2335 C Pare Raymond A. Wainwright AB 780 842-2073 S F Penwest Seed Three Hills AB 403 443-2577 F R Sekulic Warren F. Rycroft AB 780 765-2234 C Sendziak Don P. Stephen Edmonton AB 780 434-1322 R Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 F C True Seeds Ltd. Redwater AB 780 777-5885 C Van Roessel William Jean Bow Island AB 403 545-6018 R C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 F R Weigum Garry Sarah Three Hills AB 403 443-2476 R Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 S F R C CDC DAKOTA BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 R CDC GOLDEN BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Degenhardt Keith Terry Lee Kerry Hughenden AB 780 856-2383 C CDC GRANITE BI CDC Dist NA Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 S CDC GREENWATER BI CDC Dist Saskatchewan Pulse Growers Inc. Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 S Hadway Walter Thomas Didsbury AB 403 335-4929 R Hoff Peter Edward Gleichen AB 403 734-2140 S F Knight William Craig Brian Tees AB 403 784-3633 F Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 F Thompson M. Ellwood K. Red Deer County AB 403 728-3535 F Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 S F CDC HORIZON BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Foster Norman R. Beaverlodge AB 780 354-2107 C Hadland Edward Baldonnel BC 250 789-3646 S F R Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 F C CDC HORNET BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 R CDC INCA BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Jacula Dean S. Shawn D. Vermilion AB 780 581-9011 S Kiffiak Nathan John Foremost AB 403 867-2338 S Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 S F Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 S Van Roessel William Jean Bow Island AB 403 545-6018 S Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 S CDC LEROY BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 C CDC LIMERICK BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Dallas Bradley C. Bowden AB 403 224-2162 C Fosters Seed Feed Limited Beaverlodge AB 780 354-2107 C Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 C Hallett Dale R. Richard Carstairs AB 403 337-3072 R Hegland David Olaf Wembley AB 780 766-2450 C Hemminger Patrick Innisfail AB 403 888-2050 C Kopjar Gerald M. Rowley AB 403 368-2409 F Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane L. New Norway AB 780 352-3240 R C McDonald Gerald Co. Of Grande Prairie 1 AB 780 538-3868 C specialcrops 103Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 Albion Ridge Colony Picture Butte AB John Wurz Cell 403-634-0937 Email john.wurzhotmail.com Hard Red Spring Wheat Feed Barley Field Peas Moore Dean W. Red Deer County AB 403 227-2865 C Sayer Roger Carstairs AB 403 337-5847 C Sekulic John Jr. Rycroft AB 780 765-2280 R Shultz Shawn Didsbury AB 403 335-3694 R C Thompson M. Ellwood K. Red Deer County AB 403 728-3535 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 S F R CDC MEADOW BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Bell D. Leslie Drumheller AB 403 823-9462 C Benci Dennis Carmangay AB 403 643-2294 C Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 C Davidson E. Daryl Dean Kitscoty AB 780 846-2456 R C Foster Norman R. Beaverlodge AB 780 354-2107 R Hadland Edward Baldonnel BC 250 789-3646 F R Hartzler Leonard Carstairs AB 403 337-2416 R Hoff Peter Edward Gleichen AB 403 734-2140 C Kapitski Lawrence Andrew AB 780 365-2134 C Kiffiak Nathan John Foremost AB 403 867-2338 C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 R C Kittle James W. Andrew Viking AB 780 336-2583 R C Limoges Richard McLennan AB 780 324-2335 C Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane L. New Norway AB 780 352-3240 C Logan Glenn C. Marie Douglas Lomond AB 403 792-3696 C Massey Derwin Stettler AB 403 883-2503 C Mastin Robert B. Sundre AB 403 556-2609 R Mueller Richard R. R. Rosemary Barrhead AB 780 674-2595 R Nemetz Charlie Jerritt Lewis Stettler AB 403 742-0436 R Pare Raymond A. Wainwright AB 780 842-2073 R Penwest Seed Three Hills AB 403 443-2577 R C Radke Bryan Victor Barrhead AB 780 674-5715 R Rewerts Ken Fairview AB 780 835-3474 R Richard Gerald Spirit River AB 780 864-2339 C Richards Cliff Dan Sexsmith AB 780 766-2266 R C Sand Ron W. David R. McLaughlin AB 780 745-2251 C Sich Louis John Ivan Martin Trochu AB 403 442-2112 R Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 C True Seeds Ltd. Redwater AB 780 777-5885 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 S F Weigum Garry Sarah Three Hills AB 403 443-2476 R CDC PATRICK BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Howard Fred Wanham AB 780 694-2427 C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 F R Penwest Seed Three Hills AB 403 443-2577 R C Sich Louis John Ivan Martin Trochu AB 403 442-2112 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 F C CDC PLUTO BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 R Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 R C CDC RAEZER BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Baier Bill Dean Clyde AB 780 348-5791 R C Dewindt Harry Renee Thorhild AB 780 398-2377 Hemminger Patrick Innisfail AB 403 888-2050 C Hill Gordon P. Blair Taylor BC 250 789-3469 S Kapitski Lawrence Andrew AB 780 365-2134 C King Harold Webb David G. Three Hills AB 403 443-7330 R C Knight William Craig Brian Tees AB 403 784-3633 F Krywko Edward W. Ron Sturgeon County AB 780 939-2166 S Krywko Ronald Sturgeon County AB 780 459-8224 C McDonald Gerald Co. Of Grande Prairie 1 AB 780 538-3868 C Penwest Seed Three Hills AB 403 443-2577 R Sand Ron W. David R. McLaughlin AB 780 745-2251 C Sayer Roger Carstairs AB 403 337-5847 R Sendziak Don P. Stephen Edmonton AB 780 434-1322 R Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 F R CDC SAFFRON BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Amyotte Phillip Mallaig AB 780 635-4010 C Benci Dennis Carmangay AB 403 643-2294 C Chin Ridge Seeds Ltd. Taber AB 403 223-3900 F Galloway Farms Fort Saskatchewan AB 780 998-3036 R Hemminger Patrick Innisfail AB 403 888-2050 C Huvenaars Carl Hays AB 403 725-2213 C Kiffiak Nathan John Foremost AB 403 867-2338 F C Kopjar Gerald M. Rowley AB 403 368-2409 F R C Lefsrud Kevin J. Edmund J. Viking AB 780 336-2500 S specialcrops 104 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta GLDAGVentures Pedigree Seed Sales Box 270 Andrew AB T0B 0C0 Phone 780 365-3536 Cell 780 945-6107 Lawrence Kapitski 780 365-2134 Roundup Ready Liberty Link and Clearfield Canola Certified cereals and pulses on farm scale. PEAS CDC Meadows CDC Amarillo CDC Raezer WHEAT Stettler Harvest CDC NRG 003 CDC Plentiful Muchmore BARLEY AC Metcalfe OATS Triactor AC Morgan Spring Wheat Elie CWRS Winter Wheat Gateway Durum Raymore Vivid CWAD Barley CDC Meredith Flax Westlin 70 Yellow Peas CDC Saffron Mustard Andante Yellow Centennial Brown Vulcan Oriental Hemp Grandi Finola Ryan Mercer RR8-10-11 Lethbridge AB. T1J 4P4 P 403-327-9736 C 403-308-2297 E rmercermercerseeds.ca 9047-100 Street Morinville AB T8R 1R2 JOANNE BORLE MANAGER www.seed.ab.caplantsMorinville mscptelusplanet.net Ph. 780 939-4021 Ph. 855 939-4021 Fax 780 939-2605 MORINVILLE MUNICIPAL SEED CLEANING CO-0P LTD. Markert Seeds Ltd. Vulcan AB 403 485-6708 F R C Mercer Seeds Ltd. Lethbridge AB 403 327-9736 S C Penwest Seed Three Hills AB 403 443-2577 C Shultz Shawn Didsbury AB 403 335-3694 C Sleepy Hollow Seeds Ltd. Milk River AB 403 647-2228 C Solick Leonard Kelsey Corwin Halkirk AB 403 884-2358 C Stamp Seeds Enchant AB 403 739-2233 C Warkentin Harold K. Errol Tofield AB 780 662-2617 F CDC STRIKER BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Sim Darwin Derek Ponoka AB 780 372-2111 S F CDC TETRIS BI CDC Dist University of Saskatchewan Mueller Richard R. R. Rosemary Barrhead AB 780 674-2595 R Rewerts Ken Fairview AB 780 835-3474 R C Richard Gerald Spirit River AB 780 864-2339 C Sendziak Don P. Stephen Edmonton AB 780 434-1322 C LN4228 BI NA Dist Lindholm Seed Farm Lindholm Craig Stevan Dane Luke New Norway AB 780 352-3240 S F REDBAT 8 BI NA Dist NA Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 R REDBAT 88 BI NA Dist NA Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 S F THUNDERBIRD BI AAFC Lacombe Dist Canterra Seeds Jonk Nicholas Westlock AB 780 349-5458 R SOYBEANS S F R C AAC EDWARD BI AAFC Dist SeCan Members Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 S MAHONY R2 BI NA Dist Monsanto Canada Inc. Fabian Patrick V. Tilley AB 403 377-2000 R C Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 C NSC MOOSOMIN RR2Y BI NA Dist Northstar Seed Ltd. Sand Ron W. David R. McLaughlin AB 780 745-2251 C OAC MORDEN BI NA Dist University of Guelph Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 S OAC PRUDENCE BI NA Dist University of Guelph Willms Henry Timothy H. Grassy Lake AB 403 655-2434 R 105Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 Est. 1906 Glenn Marie Douglas Heather Logan Box 249 Lomond AB T0L 1G0 Phone 403 792-3696 Fax 403 792-3397 www.wheatcrest.com e-mail seedwheatcrest.com Specializing in the production and processing of pedigreed seed. specialcrops Carmangay Seed Plant Box 6 Carmangay Alberta T0L 0N0 Phone 403 643-3656 carmangayseedcleaningplant.com Rod Cell 403 593-2687 Chris Cell 403 593-2684 Technology Matters 106 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta For your convenience we now have scale on site for quick loading. We are ready to meet your needs. Give us a call to discuss what we can do to help you this spring. Performance Pedigreed Seed Farm Box 1363 Redwater Alberta T0A 2W0 Chelsea Tomlinson Cell 780 777-5885 Wheat CDC Utmost AC Muchmore AAC Penhold CPS Faba Beans Snowbird Barley Oats AC Morgan Yellow Peas CDC Meadow Amarillo ALBERTAS agriculture industry is always on the cutting edge of technology and the Alberta Seed Guide is no exception. In additional to a refreshed look seed.ab.ca has upgraded the site to be responsive for easier viewing when youre on the go. That means you can access the Alberta Seed Guides articles and search tools from your tablet or smartphone for mobile-friendly viewing. The Alberta Seed Guide website seed.ab.ca has been revamped to bring you improved search tools and more convenient access than ever before. DigitalAccesstoASGEvolves The Alberta Seed Guide website has been revamped to be more user-friendly. When you visit the new site you will see that our menu has changed directing you to helpful tools and information for your farm. Use the Find Seed section to locate seed growers in your area and access the Seed For Sale database that can help you locate spe- cific pedigreed seed varieties and the seed growers offering them. The Clean Seed section of the site can help you find members of the Alberta Seed Processors who offer seed cleaning seed treating and many other useful services for your farm. Additionally we improved our digital access to Regional Variety Trial results and you can now view these online or download the results. Produced in partnership by the Alberta Seed Growers Association ASGA and the Alberta Seed Processors ASP the Alberta Seed Guide strives to go beyond variety information offering in-depth articles on the issues driving change in the industry seed and whole- farm best management practices and new seed related products. Via the new seed.ab.ca get the latest content featured in our print publications as well as online-exclusive content on your desktop computer tablet or smartphone. You can also continue to access digital flipbooks of our print versions as well. You can also sign up to receive a digital version of the Alberta Seed Guide for free delivered straight to your inbox. Start surfing visit the new seed.ab.ca and let us know what you think by using the handy contact form. Wed love to hear from you Viewpoints 108 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta IN August Rob Davies assumed the role of general manager of Alberta Barley. Davies comes to Alberta Barley with a long history of experi- ence in the agriculture business sector including 15 years as the CEO of Weyburn Inland Terminal. His career path has provided him with a wide range of experience in both the crop inputs and grain handling industries and also includes several terms of service with various agricultural industry boards and Government of Canada working groups. The Alberta Seed Guide recently caught up with Davies for an interview on whats in store for Alberta Barley and the provinces barley growers. Alberta Seed Guide As general manager for Alberta Barley what are your major goals and how do you plan to accomplish them Rob Davies For over 24 years Alberta Barley has worked on behalf of Albertas barley farmers. As the general manager my main goal is to ensure that Alberta Barley continues to provide value to the farmers we represent. Research is our No. 1 way of maximizing barleys potential and varietal development is a key piece of our research strategy. We need to continue developing varieties that show yield improve- ments better resistance to lodging and improved genetic disease resistance. But above and beyond this we need to ensure these new varieties meet the needs of the industry while maintaining a good net return to our farmers. ASG Alberta Barleykeeps farmers updated on its activities and industry developments through its blog website and regional meetingswhile keeping Canadians informed of barleys value and potential through special publications projects and media releases. Whats new and exciting from Alberta Barley that stake- holders should watch for New Alberta Barley GM Working to Advance Canadas Third-Largest Crop Rob Davies sees growing opportunities for Alberta barley in international markets. Rob Davies is the new general manager for Alberta Barley. 109Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 RD We regularly update our website www.albertabarley.com with interesting information including our upcoming events commission news and projects in fact our website even features pages dedicated to our top priorities. On the research page you can find a comprehensive breakdown of our projects including total cost project partners and final results. As for upcoming events our farmer members should be on the lookout for information about Alberta Barleys regional meetings. These meetings are an opportunity to learn new and valuable information about the industry and to see how we work for our members. As well we encourage farmers to attend the Alberta Barley annual general meeting this December. This unique event features an exciting lineup of speakers more information about our work and the opportunity to network with members of the industry. ASG What do you feel is the biggest success the Alberta barley industry has had in the past year and how was it achieved What lessons can the industry learn from that going forward RD At our 2014 annual general meeting a resolution proposed by an Alberta barley farmer was approved to explore the pos- sibility of a malt barley insurance program under AFSC. Over the past year we have worked with AFSC and malting companies to design such a program and it is currently in the next stage of review. The success of this resolution goes to show the value of collaborating with all levels of the value chain. ASG What do you feel are the biggest challenges the Alberta barley industry faces at the moment in regard to market devel- opment and what role do you see Alberta Barley playing in overcoming them RD There is a strong demand for barley we know that but we need to ensure we are growing varieties that strike a balance between the demand of end users such as brewers and feedlots and the needs of farmers. By collaborating with the entire value chain we can help develop varieties that fit the characteristics demanded by the end user and the agronomic qualities that fit the needs of the farmers. This will ensure profitability for both the end users and our farmer members. ASG What are your biggest policy concerns with regard to barley and how do you plan to work with government and industry to ensure barley producers benefit from good policy RD We see growing opportunities for Alberta barley in interna- tional markets but to meet this demand we need to ensure our transportation system can move our grain in a cost-effective and timely manner. We need a sustainable transportation system to meet the growing North American and international demand for barley and our increasing crop yields. Alberta Barley was instrumental in shaping the legislation for Bill C-30 the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act. We met with the Government of Albertas rail transportation task team and with representatives of the Canada Transportation Act review panel. Alberta Barley is committed to ensuring that this issue remains a priority for industry and government. ASG In regard to research and development where do your interests lie and why What excites you most about current research projects being conducted How can the Alberta research pipeline be strengthened to ensure Alberta remains a leader in the field RD Alberta Barleys ongoing research projects are focused in the areas of feed malt food agronomy and bio-products. By investing in these project areas we can improve the production of barley and barley products while increasing the net return to our farmers. That being said we want to increase our collabora- tion with end users in the livestock and malt industries to develop varieties that not only provide improved returns to farmers but also meet the needs of the end user. Currently we are involved in a variety of feed focused projects. These projects are an exciting opportunity to show how feed barley improves the end use carcass characteristics in livestock such as beef and swine. Increased research funding will help promote long-term sus- tainable growth which is why we need further investments from the industry and the provincial and federal governments. Research is our No. 1 way of maximizing barleys potential and varietal development is a key piece of our research strategy. Rob Davies ALBERTA SEED GROWERS ADVERTISING IN THIS ISSUE OF ALBERTA SEED GUIDE. Enchant Rivercourse Edmonton Lethbridge Lomond Three Hills St. Albert Andrew Tofield Viking Halkirk Didsbury Innisfail Tees Brooks Vulcan Picture Butte Iron Springs Gleichen Bow Island Barrhead Nobleford Taber Stettler Redwater Fort Saskatchewan Westlock Olds Carstairs Tilley Clyde New Norway Andrew GLD AgVentures 780.365.3536 lkapitskimcsnet.ca 104 Barrhead Anderson Seed Growers 780.674.5670 asgseedxplornet.com 95 Forward Seed Farm 780.307.4343 forwardseedfarmgmail.com 100 Radke Pedigreed Seed Ltd. 780.674.5715 moosecreekxplornet.com 90 Ricks Pedigreed Seeds 780.674.6713 smuellermcsnet.ca 88 Bow Island Tony Crooymans Sons 403.545.2151 johncrooymanscanopycanada.net 88 Specialty Seeds Ltd. 403.545.6018 willspecialtyseeds.ca 92 Brooks 387099 Alberta Ltd. 403.501.5420 jmdovicheidnet.org 94 Airth Farms Ltd 403.362.4372 airthfarmsxplornet.com 93 Carstairs Hallets Hay and Seed 403.337.2469 hallettrichardhotmail.com 30 Clyde Bar 3 Farms 780.348.5791 103 Didsbury LS Land Cattle 403.335.3694 stshultzxplornet.com 98 Westway Farms Ltd. 403.335.4929 westwayairenet.com 92 Edmonton Sendziak Seed 780.434.1322 sendseedtelusplanet.net 84 Enchant Stamp Seeds 403.739.2233 officestampseeds.com 84 Fort Saskatchewan Galloway Seeds Ltd. 780.998.3036 gallseedgallowayseeds.com 102 Gleichen Livingspring Seed Farms 403.734.2140 92 Halkirk Solick Seeds 403.884.2358 lsolickwildroseinternet.ca 88 Innisfail Thompson Family Farms Ltd. 403.728.3535 93 WA Grain and Pulse Solutions 403.888.2050 infowagrain.ca 25 Iron Springs Witdouck Farms 403.738.4395 dalewitdouckfarms.com 90 Lethbridge Mercer Seeds Ltd. 403.327.9736 rmercermercerseeds.ca 104 SeedNet 403-952-0913 infoseednet.ca 51 Lomond Wheatcrest Farms 403.792.3696 wheatcrest.farmsagt.net 105 X59 Pedigreed Hemp Seed 403 739-3762 wiensdstelus.net 99 New Norway Lindholm Seed Farm 780.352.3240 lindholmseedxplornet.com 101 Nobleford Phoenix Farms 403.824.3585 johnphoenixfarms.ca 84 Olds GD Ellis Farms 403.556.2890 ellisxplornet.com 89 Picture Butte Albion Ridge Colony 403.634.0937 john.wurzhotmail.com 103 Haney Farms 403.738.4517 ssmithhaneyfarms.com 99 Redwater Performance Pedigreed Seed Farm 780.777.5885 106 Rivercourse Harbin Seed Farm Ltd. 780.745.2268 harbintelusplanet.net 96 Stettler Echo Ridge Farm Inc. 403.741.6464 kirby.masseygmail.com 90 St. Albert Victoor Seed Farm Inc. 780.459.3253 vsfairsurfer.ca 98 Taber Chin Ridge Seeds 403.223.3900 kellychinridge.com 97 Tees Knights Seed 403.784.3633 bgknightplatinum.ca 98 Three Hills Kings Seed Farm Ltd. 403.443.7330 kingsseedfarmgmail.com 101 Penwest Seeds 403. 443.2577 tanyapenwestcanada.ca 86 Tilley Fabian Seed Farms 403.633.9999 fabianeidnet.org 73 Tofield Haralie Seed Farms 780.662.2617 haraliehotmail.com 92 Viking 6King Genetics 780.336.5700 lefsrudtelusplanet.net 73 Kittle Farms Ltd. 780.336.2583 andrewkittlehotmail.com 101 Lefsrud Seed Processors Ltd. 780.336.2588 lefsrudtelusplanet.net 99 Vulcan Markert Seeds Ltd. 403.485.6708 rmarkertmarkertseeds.com 102 Westlock Cyre Seed Farms 780.349.4775 gcyrexplornet.com 94 110 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta 111Advancing Seed in Alberta fall.2015 The Alberta Seed Processors is a group of locally operated co-operatives that offer valuable cleaning services for communities throughout Alberta and British Columbia. They were established through the joint efforts of the Province of Alberta and local municipal governments. Farmers can get seed cleaned and treated at facilities across the province. Additional services available at several facilities include pulse processing value processing pedigreed seed processing specialty processing and seed inoculating as well as seed and chemical sales. Location ad page Alliance Alliance Seed Cleaning Association Ltd. 780.879.3927 alliancwildroseinternet.ca www.seed.ab.caplantsAlliance 88 Barrhead Barrhead District Seed Cleaning Co.op Ltd. 780.674.2569 barrseedtelus.net 95 Bashaw Bashaw Seed Cleaning Co.op Association Ltd. 780.372.3868 bashawscpxplornet.com www.seed.ab.caplantsBashaw 105 Camrose Camrose County Seed Cleaning Plant 780.672.2371 ryarhamcounty.camrose.ab.ca www.county.camrose.ab.ca 97 Carmangay Carmangay Seed Cleaning Plant Association Ltd. 403 643.3656 carseedwildroseinternet.ca 105 Carstairs Mountain View Seed Cleaning Plant Ltd. 403.337.3155 mvscplhotmail.com www.seed.ab.caplantsMountainView 96 Coronation Coronation Seed Cleaning Co.op Ltd. 403.578.3810 coroseedxplornet.com www.seed.ab.caplantsCoronation 100 Morinville Morinville Municipal Seed Cleaning Co.op Ltd. 780.939.4021 mscptelusplanet.net www.seed.ab.caplantsMorinville 104 Rycroft Central Peace Seed Cleaning Association 780.765.3821 cpscaabnorth.com www.seed.ab.caplantsRycroft 93 Sexsmith Sexsmith Co.op Seed Cleaning Association Ltd. 780.568.3970 sscptelus.net www.seed.ab.caplantsSexsmith 97 St. Paul St. Paul Municipal Seed Cleaning Association Ltd. 780.645.3939 ron.wirstastpaulseedcleaning.com www.stpaulseedcleaning.com 94 SEED CLEANING PLANTS AND TREATING SERVICES IN YOUR COMMUNITY. Barrhead Sexsmith Alliance Coronation Wetaskiwin Warburg Morinville Westlock Carstairs Rycroft St. Paul Bashaw Carmangay Camrose Three Hills Three Hills Three Hills District Seed Cleaning Plant 403.443.5464 thscptelusplanet.net thscp.ca 98 Warburg Warburg Seed Cleaning Co.op Ltd. 780.848.2365 warscpgmail.com www.seed.ab.caplantswarburg 84 Westlock Westlock Seed Cleaning Co.op Ltd. 780.349.3944 wscptelus.net www.seed.ab.caplantsWestlock 87 Wetaskiwin Wetaskiwin Seed Grain Co.operative Ltd. 780.352.6212 seedcleanincentre.net www.seed.ab.caplantsWetaskiwin 93 On the Edge significant quantities on an annual basis and two countries are major competitors. The deal also includes countries with emerging markets that could further enhance international wheat trade. Japan the United States and Mexico purchase an approximate three million tonnes combined of Canadian wheat per year while the U.S. and Australia are major competitors in export markets such as Japan said Kent Erickson chairman Alberta Wheat Commission. Canada could not afford to remain on the sidelines and risk losing ground in key markets. Japan is a premium market for Canadian wheat with average sales in excess of one million tonnes per year and as high as 1.5 million tonnes. In Japan the TPP agreement will provide improved markets access for feed and food wheat through elimination of duties and increased quotas Erickson said. Tariffs on wheat exports to Vietnam will be eliminated. TPP will also provide significant benefits for other export- oriented agriculture sectors including barley canola beef and pork and give Canadian producers an advantage over competitors outside of the agreement Erickson added. The 12 signatories to the TPP are Canada the U.S. Japan Australia New Zealand Brunei Darussalam Chile Malaysia Mexico Peru Singapore and Vietnam. TPP countries represent over 40 per cent of the worlds gross domestic product GDP. Cargill Officially Opens Doors at Canola Processing Facility Cargillcelebrated the opening of its newest investment inAlberta this past summer a state-of-the-art canola processing facility inCamrose alongsideAlbertafarmers industry stakeholders and dignitaries. This plant has the capacity to process over one million metric tonnes of canola per year and will provideAlbertacanola growers with a competitive point of delivery in this region saysKen Stone assistant vice president forCargillsCanadian canola processing business. The newCargillcanola processing facility is the first major investment inAlbertasgrains and oilseed sector in 30 years and further diversifiesAlbertasagriculture sector and competitiveness in the global marketplace. The global demand for canola is on the rise and were targeting an increase to 26 million metric tonnes by the year 2025 saysPatti Miller president of the Canola Council ofCanada. More than half of this will be processed inCanadafor markets around the world.Cargillsnew plant takes us a step closer to achieving this goal. This crush facility will also placeAlbertascanola sector at a competitive advantage in the global marketplace as markets become available through the proposed Trans Pacific Partnership according to Cargill. Liberals Promise to Defend Supply Management Invest 100 Million in Ag Research A Liberal majority government was elected in the Oct. 19 federal election. At press time the Canadian agriculture industry was waiting to see what a Grit government will have planned in terms of its agriculture policy and who the countrys next agriculture minister would be. Here are a few snapshots of what was included in the Liberal campaign platform in regard to Canadian ag courtesy of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture To attract investment and create good jobs in food processing the Liberals commit to investing 160 million over four years in an Agri-Food Value Added Investment Fund. This will provide technical and marketing assistance to help food processors develop new value-added products that reflect changing tastes and market opportunities. To support innovation in the agricultural sector the Liberals pledge an additional 100 million over four years in agricultural research. To better allocate research funding they say they will establish a transparent process that involves food producers. Commit to putting up 200 million a year for three years to help research facilities small business incubators and exporters andinvest another 100 million a year for an industrial research assistance program. They noted support for the Canadian Agriculture and Agri- Food Workforce Action Plan developed by CFACAHRC They pledge to continue to defend Canadian interests during trade negotiations including supply management. Alberta Wheat Commission Welcomes Conclusion of Trans-Pacific Partnership The Alberta Wheat Commission issues a statement in support of the Trans-Pacific Partnership TPP which holds the potential for expanded market opportunities in key wheat export markets. AWC looks forward to reviewing the details of the agreement. Among the 12 signatories to the TPP three countries are major customers of Canadian wheat three others buy 112 www.seed.ab.ca Advancing Seed in Alberta ALWAYS FOLLOW GRAIN MARKETING AND ALL OTHER STEWARDSHIP PRACTICES AND PESTICIDE LABEL DIRECTIONS. Details of these requirements can be found in the Trait Stewardship Responsibilities Notice to Farmers printed in this publication. 2015 Monsanto Canada Inc. Theres no way to know what Mother Nature is going to throw at you but there is a way to be ready for it. With built-in technology that helps you tackle tough weeds in tough conditions Genuity Roundup Ready canola can be the most valuable tool in your field. Its the foundation for a family of high-yielding canola hybrids that offer diverse disease resistance and enable progressive farming practices such as straight cutting. You cant anticipate everything but you can prepare for anything. Get ready for next season talk to your retailer about booking Genuity Roundup Ready canola for 2016. READY FOR ANYTHING. PROFIT GROWS. From high-yielding seed genetics to heart-healthy Omega-9 oil only Nexera canola reflects a growing value chain that produces the highest returns per acre year after year. GROW WITH NEXERA. EXPERIENCE THE PROFIT. healthierprofits.ca TM Trademark ofThe Dow Chemical Company Dow or an affiliated company of Dow. 1115-45385-02 ASG